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Foreign Policy Centre

Ideas for a fairer world

Research: Global Security Challenges

Related Research Projects
Africa
Energy and Environment
Iran
Middle East
South Asia
USA & Transatlantic Relations

The Global Security Challenges programme takes broad overview of the key security problems facing the international community. Its scope ranges from traditional defence and conflict issues to wider questions of competition for resources, climate change, migration, political and religious extremism.

Upcoming Events

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> Investing in women's economic resilience & social wellbeing: Rethinking the role of private sector development in Africa

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supported by Nestlé

Part of the 'Africa Rising? Building Africa's Productive Capacity for Inclusive Growth' series

In a series of Foreign Policy Centre (FPC) roundtable discussions - supported by Nestlé - the FPC seeks to explore how business can play a more constructive role in building resilience to improve women's economic and social wellbeing across Africa. The proposed series of roundtable discussions come at a time when global development priorities are being reshaped and redefined in the wake of a post-2015 UN Millennium Development Goals' agenda. In addition, 2015 marks the 15th anniversary of the adoption of Security Council Resolution 1325 on women, peace and security. This resolution promotes the importance of women in building peace and security in states affected by conflict. All this is coupled with the fact that the global economic recovery remains fragile. Existing inequality and insecurity disproportionately affects women, and has been compounded by the unprecedented global economic crisis, on-going austerity and mounting uncertainty. These conditions present very real challenges for public spending dedicated to development. As such, understanding the development transformation role played by business and enterprise has become increasingly important.

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Articles

> FPC Briefing: Extradition- Time to remove the nationality bar

By Andrew Southam.

In this FPC Briefing Research Associate Andrew Southam examines the nationality protection used by a number of countries to prohibit the extradition of alleged criminals to face trial. This contrasts with the practice of a number of countries including the US and UK that do not refuse to return their own citizens to face trial, provided due process has been followed and proper safeguards are in place. This briefing sets out the situation and calls for steps towards removing the nationality bar from extradition practices. Southam argues that such a bar is against the modern trend to streamline extradition procedures, is an unnecessary protection given other safeguards, and is contrary to wider international initiatives to combat crime. The briefing makes suggestions about how this can be achieved and explores the benefits and disadvantages of alternatives, including local prosecutions.

Download FPC Briefing: Extradition-Time to remove the nationality bar (440 kilobyte PDF)


> FPC Briefing: How Do International Economic Sanctions (Not) Work?

By Dr Lee Jones.

In this new FPC Briefing Dr Lee Jones argues that instead of simply asking whether sanctions work, the international community should first ask: 'how are they supposed to effect the change we seek, and do they actually "work" this way in practice?' This research looks into how 'economic pain' translates – or fails to translate – into 'political gain' in target states. The starting point for Jones is that political outcomes in target states are predominantly determined by struggles between ruling and opposition coalitions of social and political forces. Sanctions 'work' by manipulating the political economy of targets, with consequences for the composition of forces contesting state power, plus their resources, alliances and strategies. Where sanctions can compel ruling and opposition coalitions to adopt strategic responses that meet the goals of those imposing sanctions, they may be 'successful'. However, this is generally possible only where opposition groups are already powerful and well organised. In contexts where oppositions are weak and fragmented, sanctions tend to entrench their exclusion from power, even if they also manage to weaken ruling coalitions. Since this is often the case in states where sanctions are used, sanctions are often ineffective. The briefing gives some suggestions for policymakers that include the need for careful planning, including plausibly specifying the mechanisms by which they expect sanctions to operate. If the mechanisms cannot be identified, Dr Jones argues sanctions should not be imposed.

Download FPC Briefing: International Economic Sanctions (400 kilobyte PDF)


> FPC Briefing: Preventing Violence Against Women: The Case of Iraq

By Ludovica Di Giorgi, Dr Simon Mabon.

In this FPC Briefing Research Associate Dr Simon Mabon and Ludovicia Di Giorgi examine the deteriorating situation regarding violence against women in Iraq, in areas both under Government and ISIS control.

Download the article (390 kilobyte PDF)


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Publications

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> Shelter from the storm?

[Cover of Shelter from the storm?]

Adam Hug (Ed.)

April 2014

Download Shelter from the storm? (1.82 megabyte PDF)

Shelter from the storm? The asylum, refuge and extradition situation facing activists from the former Soviet Union in the CIS and Europe looks at some of the key issues around asylum, extradition and the provision of refuge for human rights defenders, political and religious activists and other controversial figures from the former Soviet Union. It examines the extent to which Russia and other CIS countries abide by their obligations under European and international law when facing extradition requests from fellow signatories to the Minsk Convention. It also explores European asylum and immigration policies and how they impact on activists from the former Soviet Union.

Shelter from the Storm? contains contributions from: Felix Corley (Forum 18); Elisabeth Dyvik (ICORN The International Cities of Refuge Network); Julia Hall and Maisy Weicherding (Amnesty International); Adam Hug (ed., Foreign Policy Centre); Dr David Lewis (University of Exeter); Kris Pollett and Claire Rimmer Quaid (European Council on Refugees and Exiles – ECRE); Alex Tinsley (Fair Trials International); and Daria Trenina (MGIMO-University).


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> Europe in the World: Can EU foreign policy make an impact?

[Cover of Europe in the World: Can EU foreign policy make an impact?]

Adam Hug (Ed.)

February 2013 Hard copy: £4.95, plus £1 p+p.

Download Europe in the World: Can EU foreign policy make an impact? (2.02 megabyte PDF)

The Foreign Policy Centre's new publication, Europe in the World: Can EU foreign policy make an impact?, examines both how Europe is seen on the world stage and the effectiveness of the new External Action Service in delivering on its key objectives: building an effective new diplomatic service, strengthening EU influence in the neighbourhood and developing relations with strategic partners. It explores the institutional and organisational challenges surrounding the creation of the EEAS and considers what tensions remain with other EU institutions and national governments, with particular reference to the UK's difficult relationship with Europe.

Europe in the World is edited by Adam Hug (Foreign Policy Centre). It contains contributions on a range of topics and different perspectives from: Dr. Jozef Batora (Comenius University), Thiago de Aragão (Foreign Policy Centre), William Gumede (Foreign Policy Centre), Jacqueline Hale (Open Society Foundations), Richard Howitt MEP, Stefan Lehne (Carnegie Europe), Dr. Simon Lightfoot and Dr Balazs Szent-Ivanyi (University of Leeds), Prof. Anand Menon (Kings College London), Rt. Hon. Sir Malcolm Rifkind KCMG, QC, MP, Edward Macmillan-Scott MEP, Prof. John Peterson (University of Edinburgh), Dr. Neil Winn (University of Leeds). Rt. Hon. Douglas Alexander MP (Shadow Foreign Secretary) provides the foreword.

The findings of the Europe in the World publication have been extensively referenced in the UK Government's Review of the Balance of Competences between the United Kingdom and the European Union: Foreign Policy paper.


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> Responsibility to the poor: A new agenda for changed times

Rt Hon Douglas Alexander MP

September 2010

Download Responsibility to the poor: A new agenda for changed times (790 kilobyte PDF)

In a publication launched by the Foreign Policy Centre entitled 'Responsibility to the poor: A new agenda for changed times', the former UK Secretary of State for International Development, Rt Hon Douglas Alexander MP, outlines why justice not charity needs to underpin the fight against global inequality and poverty. FPC Co-President Baroness Jay provides the foreword.


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Past Events

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> The Foreign Policy Centre at the 2015 Conservative Party Conference

Tuesday 6 October - Manchester

The Foreign Policy Centre is hosting a fringe event at this year's Conservative Party Conference in Manchester. Please click below to download the flyer. The event is free and open to all, however Conference accreditation WILL be required to gain access to the venue which is located inside the secure zone.

Download FPC fringe at the 2015 Conservative Party Conference (210 kilobyte PDF)


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> Trouble in the Neighbourhood? The future of the EU's Eastern Partnership- London second seminar

Date: Tuesday 3rd March 2015

Time: 6.00pm-7.30pm

Venue: Committee Room 16, House of Commons, Westminster

Speakers:

  • Mike Gapes MP, Member of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee (Labour)
  • Laura Sandys MP (Conservative)
  • Baroness Falkner, Liberal Democrat Foreign Affairs Spokesperson
  • Dr Andrew Wilson, Reader in Ukrainian Studies, UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies and Senior Policy Fellow, ECFR
  • Dr Kevork Oskanian, Research Fellow, University of Birmingham and FPC Research Associate

Chair: Mary Dejevsky, Chief Editorial Writer and Columnist, The Independent

This second London seminar as part of the Trouble in the Neighbourhood? The future of the EU's Eastern Partnership project, in partnership with the European Commission Representation in the UK, will take stock of recent developments in the EU's relationship with the countries in its eastern neighbourhood: Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Moldova, Belarus and Ukraine. The issue of the EU's role in the region and the influence of the Russian-led alternative the Eurasian Economic Union have been at the heart of a major geo-political upheaval. The decision by Ukraine's then President Yanukovych to reject Eastern Partnership under pressure from Russia in the summer of 2013 lit the spark for the dramatic subsequent events in that country, while Armenia made a similar switch under Russian pressure ahead of the key November 2013 Vilnius summit. This seminar will look at the key planks of the EU's approach to the region including the offers of Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Agreements, visa reform, funding for reform projects and political engagement.

Free copies of the Trouble in the Neighbourhood? The future of the EU's Eastern Partnership publication will be available.

The event is free and open to all. Please RSVP to events@fpc.org.uk

Download Trouble in the Neighbourhood? London second seminar flyer (430 kilobyte PDF)


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> Trouble in the Neighbourhood? The future of the EU's Eastern Partnership- Edinburgh seminar

Date: Thursday 26th February 2015

Time: 6pm-7.30pm

Venue: St Giles Suite, Radisson Blu Hotel, Royal Mile, 80 High Street, Edinburgh EH1 1TH

Speakers:

  • Christina McKelvie MSP, Convenor of the European and External Relations Committee, Scottish Parliament (SNP)
  • David Martin MEP, European Parliament S&D Group International Trade Coordinator(Labour)
  • Jamie McGrigor MSP(Conservative)
  • Dr Carmen Gebhard, Lecturer, Politics and International Relations, University of Edinburgh
  • Adam Hug, Policy Director, Foreign Policy Centre

Chair: David Pratt, Foreign Editor, The Herald and Sunday Herald

This Edinburgh seminar for the Trouble in the Neighbourhood? The future of the EU's Eastern Partnership project, in partnership with the European Commission Office in Scotland and the University of Edinburgh, will take stock of recent developments in the EU's relationship with the countries in its eastern neighbourhood: Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Moldova, Belarus and Ukraine. The issue of the EU's role in the region and the influence of the Russian-led alternative the Eurasian Economic Union have been at the heart of a major geo-political upheaval. The decision by Ukraine's then President Yanukovych to reject Eastern Partnership under pressure from Russia in the summer of 2013 lit the spark for the dramatic subsequent events in that country, while Armenia made a similar switch under Russian pressure ahead of the key November 2013 Vilnius summit. This seminar will look at the key planks of the EU's approach to the region including the offers of Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Agreements, visa reform, funding for reform projects and political engagement. The seminar will examine both the EU's objectives in the region and how Europe is perceived by the Eastern Partnership countries themselves, along with how the domestic political situation in EU member states (most notably the UK) and the Eastern Partners shapes the relationship.

The seminar will also act as the Scottish launch event for the new publication Trouble in the Neighbourhood? The future of the EU's Eastern Partnership. Free copies will be available.

The seminar is free and open to all. Refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to events@fpc.org.uk

Download Trouble in the Neighbourhood? Edinburgh flyer (450 kilobyte PDF)


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