Skip to content

Adam Hug

Director

Adam Hug became the Director of the Foreign Policy Centre in November 2017, overseeing the FPC's operations and strategic direction. He had previously been the Policy Director at the Foreign Policy Centre from 2008-2017. His research focuses on human rights and governance issues particularly in the former Soviet Union. He also writes on UK foreign policy and EU issues. His previous roles included work as a consultant on EU consumer protection issues and working with Israeli and Palestinian trade unions and civil society groups. He studied at Geography at the University of Edinburgh as an undergraduate and Development Studies with Special Reference to Central Asia as a post-grad.

Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6005 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2021-07-22 11:10:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-22 10:10:45 [post_content] => As we approach the 30th anniversary of Kazakhstan’s independence this publication finds the country in a period of change. The gradual passing of the torch from First President Nazarbayev to President Tokayev, growing social protests as living standards have been squeezed for many, and an uncertain future that lies ahead given the global move away from fossil fuels, make it an important time to take stock of the current state of human rights and governance in Kazakhstan. Over the last 30 years Kazakhstan’s ruling elite has delivered substantial economic growth - albeit particularly benefiting itself - and has mostly maintained stability between the country’s different ethnic groups. This has come at the cost of almost all political freedoms and many civil liberties. The Government and its supporters still argue that gradual steps will enable Kazakhstan to transition to democracy and help ‘evolve’ the political culture in Kazakhstan. Their critics point to the lack of change at the heart of the country’s political system over the last 30 years, where reforms have helped deliver improvements in the standards of living and the delivery of public services but have not lead to a meaningful transfer in political power from the elite to the citizen. The only political choice in Kazakhstan, such Tokayev assuming the Presidency, is exercised by those already in power. President Tokayev has promised a ‘listening state’ and committed to delivering reforms that would improve freedoms and make the Government more responsive but change so far has been limited. His approach seems to be continuing the path of ‘modernisation without democratisation’ or ‘reform within the system’ that improves state efficiency and outcomes while mostly retaining existing authoritarian power structures. The widespread use of ‘freedom restrictions’ that prevent activists from continuing their work is indicative of the objective to curb criticism and silence dissent. There are opportunities for local activists and the international community to apply pressure to address human right abuses and to help deliver reform, particularly in areas of governance that do not address the wider balance of power. Achieving more systemic change is a greater challenge and one that will likely involve further action at an international level to expose corruption. Key recommendations Based on the findings of the research in this publication the Government of Kazakhstan should:
  • Stop targeting NGOs with punitive tax inspections and burdensome reporting requirements;
  • Make it easier for parties to register and protect political activists from state harassment;
  • End the use of anti-extremism legislation powers under Criminal Code Article 405 and Article 174 to target protestors or those liking or sharing opposition posts on social media;
  • Further reform the law on public assembly to end restrictions on unregistered groups;
  • Stop using kettling as a policing tactic for peaceful demonstrations;
  • End the use of ‘freedom restrictions’ in sentencing that prevent activists and bloggers from continuing their work holding the Government to account;
  • Stop the continued harassment of independent trade unions and striking workers;
  • Remove laws on insulting the honour and dignity of public officials used to silence criticism;
  • Improve data protection and privacy regulation and enforcement; and
  • Deliver on commitments to produce new laws on domestic violence and sexual harassment, while retaining protections on the right to gender equality.
 The international community should:
  • Raise systemic problems and individual cases of abuse both in private and in public; and
  • Examine the use of international mechanisms for tacking corruption and kleptocracy, including improved transparency requirements, reform of ‘golden visas’, Magnitsky sanctions and anti-corruption tools such as Unexplained Wealth Orders where appropriate.
 Image by Jussi Toivanen under (CC). [post_title] => Retreating Rights - Kazakhstan: Executive Summary [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => retreating-rights-kazakhstan-executive-summary [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-22 10:57:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-22 09:57:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://fpc.org.uk/?p=6005 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )[1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6003 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2021-07-22 11:09:46 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-22 10:09:46 [post_content] => Kazakhstan is a country that has worked hard to position itself to its people and to the world as Central Asia’s success story. On a number of key measures that reputation would seem justified, not least the rapid economic growth that has taken place since independence and its relative stability when compared to its regional neighbours, but that has come at the non-negotiable price of the on-going repression of threats, both real and perceived, to the power of the ruling elite. This publication assesses the situation in Kazakhstan today and the emerging pressures on that political settlement. It comes after a time of significant upheaval following not only the COVID-19 pandemic but after the formal (though incomplete) transition of power in 2019 from the country’s founding President Nursultan Nazarbayev to his successor President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev. A very brief history of KazakhstanThe vast expanse of territory that makes up modern Kazakhstan (at 2,724,900 square kilometres it is the 9th largest country on earth) was home to a number of different tribes throughout its early history. Political consolidation in the region is seen to have begun with the arrival of the Mongol Empire and its successor state the Golden Horde in the mid-13th Century. Upon the fragmentation of the Golden Horde the Kazakh Khanate was founded as its successor in 1465, marking the gradual emergence of Kazakh identity within the land that would ultimately become Kazakhstan. Within the Khanate three constituent tribes or hordes (Juz/Zhuz) would emerge: the Senior or Great Horde (Uly juz), the Middle Horde (Orta Juz) and the Junior Horde (Kishi juz).The history of the Kazakh Khanate has been used as a building block of Kazakhstan’s post-Independence national identity, with the state celebrating the 550th anniversary of the Khanate’s founding in 2015 with conspicuous pageantry.[1] Russian expansion into what is now Kazakhstan began in 1584 with the creation of a Cossack military settlement in Oral (Uralsk) in West Kazakhstan (the part of Kazakhstan on the western side of the Ural river which places it geographically within Europe) that would expand into the Russian settlement of Yaitskiy Gorodok in 1613. Amid pressure from rival Dzungar Khanate (the Aktaban Shubyryndy known as the barefooted flight or great disaster) the leadership of the Kazakh hordes one by one pledged their fealty to the Russians who were gradually expanding into the territory. By the 1820s Russia expanded to hold direct control over the Kishi and Orta Juz, and while the combined Khanate would briefly rise again from 1841-47 as part of resistance to Russian rule, the death of the Khan in battle in 1847 marked the end of the Kazakh Khanate as a political entity. The Russians completed their capture of the territory of what is now Kazakhstan by 1864, fully absorbing them into the Empire. Russian rule continued, mostly, uninterrupted until 1916 when efforts to conscript ethnic Kazakhs and Kyrgyz into the Russian army to fight on the Eastern front led to the Central Asian (Semirechye) revolt of 1916, which would leave between 150,000-250,000 dead after its repression by Tsarist forces. Following the collapse of central control in the wake of the Russian Revolution local Kazakh leaders declared the creation of the Alash Autonomy, on land roughly coterminous with modern Kazakhstan in December 2017. This flowering of independence would last until 1920 when the Bolsheviks completed their conquest of the region. In August 2020 the Soviet Union established in its place the Kyrgyz Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic later renamed the Kazak Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic in 1925, subsequently becoming a full Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR) in 1936. The early Soviet period was one of great upheaval for ethnic Kazakhs of the region. Stalin’s forced collectivisation in the early 1930s of the previously nomadic peoples of the region led to the Kazakh famine of 1931–1933, which is believed to have led to the deaths of 1.5 million people (of which 1.3 million were ethnic Kazakhs, 38 per cent of the total Kazakh population) amid the context of the wider Soviet famines of 1932-33. The 1950s would see the mass transfer of ethnic Russians to the Kazakh SSR as part of the ‘Virgin Lands’ campaign to boost Soviet agricultural production, leading them to outnumber ethnic Kazakhs in their titular republic until the 1980s. The period from 1949-1963 would also see the Kazakhstan SSR used as the testing ground for the Soviet Union’s nuclear weapons programme with over 110 above ground weapons tests whose fallout impacted 1.5 million people and left lasting environmental damage in the area around Semipalatinsk (now Semey).[2] From 1960-62 and 1964- 1986 Kazakhstan was ruled by Dinmukhamed Kunaev, First Secretary of the Communist Party of Kazakhstan (and from 1971 a full member of the Politburo) and a close ally of Leonid Brezhnev. Kunaev’s undoing would in part stem from his appointment in 1984 of an ambitious, young (by Soviet standards) reformer Nursultan Nazarbayev as the Chairman of the Council of Ministers (equivalent to Prime Minister of the SSR). The power struggle between the two men began in January 1986 when Nazarbayev publically criticised the First Secretary’s brother Askar Kunaev over his management of the Kazakhstan Academy of Sciences, leading to an escalating political crisis which ultimately led to the removal of both Kunayevs from their posts. Nazarbayev however was not the immediate beneficiary of this change, with Gennady Kolbin, a Russian politician who had never previously lived in Kazakhstan, being parachuted in to take over. This decision would lead to an upsurge in unrest amongst ethnic Kazakhs that peaked in the Jeltoksan (December) protests in Alma-Ata (now Almaty) that were ruthlessly suppressed with the deaths of up to 200 protestors. However, by June 1989 Nazarbayev would get the promotion he had been angling for and became First Secretary of the Communist Party of Kazakhstan. He subsequently became Chairman of the Supreme Soviet for a brief period in spring 1990 before taking over the new post of President in April 1990. As the Soviet Union collapsed Kazakhstan would be the last republic to formally declare its independence on December 16th 1991, formally joining the Commonwealth of Independence States on December 21st that had been created by the Alma-Ata Protocol. Independent KazakhstanUpon independence Kazakhstan wrestled with many of the same challenges as other newly independent republics: stabilising a cratering economy on its transition out of the Soviet planned system into something approximating the free market; trying to build a sense of national identity and unity in the newly formed country; while trying to keep a lid on potential ethnic tensions that were sparking across the region. Balancing these latter two challenges was a particular concern in Kazakhstan where ethnic Kazakhs had only recently (as of the 1989 Soviet census) and narrowly become a plurality of the republic’s population again as there were almost the same number of ethnic Russian citizens (6,534,616 and 6,227,549 respectively). The ethnic Russia population significantly outnumbered ethnic Kazakhs in many parts of Kazakhstan’s northern regions.[3] In 1992 and again in 1999-2000 there were efforts, of various degrees of seriousness, amongst Russian communities in parts of the north to reunite with Russia, all of which fizzled out with the Government of Kazakhstan working to mollify potential concerns.[4] However, over the years since independence through a combination of the gradual migration of ethnic Russians to Russia, the return of ethnic Kazakhs from East Asia and higher birth rates amongst the Kazakh population have seen the population balance shift to the ethnic Kazakh population, with it being estimated to be more than 68 per cent by the present day.[5] This shift does not prevent the ‘Russian question’ periodically raising its head, with Russian nationalist politicians periodically raising the question of reincorporating the Northern Kazakhstan region that still home to more ethnic Russians than Kazakhs.[6] One of the drivers of the migration of the Russian population in the 1990s was the initially challenging state of Kazakhstan’s economy, with the economy contracting over nine per cent per year on average between 1991 and 1995.[7] However, after weathering the initial storm, Kazakhstan’s immense natural resource wealth enabled it to stabilise in the late 1990s (despite the impact of the 1998 Russian financial crisis on the region) and then drive dramatic GDP growth over the years that followed, with a six fold increase in its GDP per capita since 2002. Kazakhstan has the 12th largest proven oil reserves in the world and would become by 2018 the ninth largest global exporter of coal and crude oil as well as the 12th largest exporter of natural gas.[8] This resource wealth has enabled Kazakhstan to significantly improve its overall standard of living beyond that of its Central Asian neighbours. This included substantial investment in the physical transformation of the country which acted both as a literal and metaphorical nation-building exercise. At the heart of this project was the plan, announced in 1994, to move the nation’s capital from the bustling but earthquake prone Almaty (renamed from Alma Ata the year before) to the smaller city in the north of the country Akmola that physically transformed into Astana (meaning capital city in Kazakh) to reflect Nazarbayev’s vision of a modern Kazakhstan, but whose design reflected the tropes of Kazakh folk history and identity he was seeking to promote. For 30 years Nazarbayev’s political control was near total. In every Presidential election he ran either literally unopposed, as in his initial election in December 1991, or with supportive or no hope candidates to create the façade of completion while ensuring the President received vote shares between 91 per cent – 99 per cent. The only exception was the 1999 contest, held after a referendum in 1995 had extended Nazarbayev’s initial term and removed term limits, when Communist party candidate Serikbolsyn Abdildin was able to stand (under heavy restrictions and reports of widespread abuse of process) where the President only received 81 per cent. As set out in more detail below, genuine efforts to create opposition movements either rooted in civil society or by former members of the ruling elite have been blocked through a mix of bureaucratic obstacles and often brutal repression. This political dominance by Nazarbayev, his family and close associates has been inextricably intertwined with the hoarding of economic opportunities by the same elite, further entrenching their power and amplifying the sense of threat from any challenge to the current system. While avoiding the regular bouts of political upheaval seen in neighbouring Kyrgyzstan, the social picture in Kazakhstan has become somewhat more unsettled since the 2008 financial crash, 2014 oil price crash (that has led to lower prices ever since) and the 2014-15 Russian financial crisis, which all accumulated to take the rocket boosters off Kazakhstan’s economy. Labour unrest has periodically flared, most notably and tragically in the 2011 Zhanaozen strike and subsequent massacre that killed at least 14 protestors and saw independent trade union activity cracked down upon, but this has not prevented subsequent protests over wages, attempts to fire and rehire workers on worse contracts and working conditions as the Government has sought to transfer state run assets in the oil sector into private hands.[9] In 2016 economic challenges mingled with concerns over Chinese encroachment into Kazakhstan (tapping into the same deep fears about the country’s sparsely populated rural areas falling into foreign hands that had previously centred on Russia), led to land protests that broke out in response to reforms to the Land Code that would have enabled foreigners to rent agricultural land for up to 25 years. The protests spread across the country in April 2016 ahead of the law’s implementation in the July, sparking a change in public willingness to engage in protest despite the restrictive legal situation.[10] As April turned to May the Government’s response grew harsher. On May 17th 2016 protesters and environmental activists Max Bokayev and Talgat Ayanov were arrested for their role in participating in and helping to organise protests. Arrests that ultimately escalated into a five year prison sentence and a subsequent three year ‘freedom restriction’ ban on political activism on the grounds of ‘inciting social discord’, ‘disseminating information known to be false’, and ‘violating the procedure for holding assemblies’.[11] At protests in several cities on May 21st the police made hundreds of arrests and charges on the grounds of ‘hooliganism’.[12] To quell the growing unrest President Nazarbayev ordered a five year moratorium on land sales, a pause that would be turned into a permanent ban in May 2021 before its expiry.[13] The issue of China has been a dimension to a number of other protests in recent years from labour disputes, water use at Lake Baikal, through to protests against the human right abuses towards ethnic Kazakhs in Xinjiang touched on below.[14] In February 2019, the tragic deaths of five young girls (aged between three months and 13 years) in a house fire in Astana while both parents were working overnight shifts, sparked a wave of protests across Kazakhstan arguing for increased social welfare payments for mothers with more than one child, improved housing and better healthcare.[15] These ‘mothers’ protests’, as explained in more detail in the essay by Colleen Wood, touched a public nerve over the extent of inequality in the country and acted as a spark to an unprecedented level of political change throughout the year. After major protests on February 15th, President Nazarbayev moved to dismiss the Government of Prime Minister Bakytzhan Sagintayev, arguing that they had failed to follow his instructions to address social issues and he ordered that new funding to be directed to increasing support payments and other measures to respond to the protestors concerns. Only a month later however, on March 19th, Nazarbayev made the much more surprising announcement that he would be immediately resigning from the Presidency to be replaced by Chair of the Senate Kassym-Jomart Tokayev (who had previously also served as Prime Minister and Foreign Minister), initially in an acting capacity before elections that would take place in July 2019. That Nazarbayev might seek to transition away from the Presidency at some point was not entirely a surprise, particularly given the unique powers he had been bestowed with as ‘First President’ and ‘Elbasy’ (leader of the nation) that would endure after he left the Presidency. These life-long powers included remaining as Chair of the National Security Council (a role with wide-ranging powers in international affairs, law enforcement and security matters and as well as powers over political appointments), continuing as leader of the ruling Nur-Otan party and other positions including membership of the Constitutional Council.[16] This special status has allowed Nazarbayev not only to protect himself and his family’s political and economic interests but to play an important role in shaping the country’s development whilst in-effect devolving day-to-day functions to President Tokayev. This has created uncertainty, both within the system and outside, around where power truly lies, acting as a break on Tokayev’s ability to set out his own independent agenda, to the extent that a number of observers still see ultimate power within the political system residing with the ‘First President’ rather than his successor who lacks a clear independent political base of his own. Handing over the duties of President has not significantly hindered the continued promotion of Nazarbayev and his legacy as a central building block in the national narrative. For example, three days after his departure from office Tokayev signed a decree renaming Astana (which had only been renamed from Akimola in 1997) as Nur-Sultan in honour of the Elbasy. While at time of publication we have seen the unveiling of two more large statues of Nazarbayev and launch of an eight hour Oliver Stone directed documentary entitled Qazaq: History of the Golden Man aimed at burnishing Nazarbayev’s legacy for both a national and international audience.[17] The transition period and early elections were marked by a rising number of political protests, which though firmly repressed, hint at further cracks in the facade of what had been seen as a relatively stable authoritarian system. In his first months in office President Tokayev tried to set out his own stall as someone offering simultaneously both continuity with Nazarbayev’s legacy and systemic reform to respond to the growing calls for change. He described his approach as a ‘listening state’ but in the context of Nazarbayev’s enduring power and influence, both formally and informally behind the scenes, his room for independent manoeuvre was limited and his influence over the state bureaucracy comparatively weak even before the crisis that descended upon Kazakhstan and the world a year after his arrival in the Presidency.[18] COVID-19The COVID-19 crisis has graphically exposed the strengths and weaknesses of political systems around the world and Kazakhstan has been no exception to this rule. The first reported case of the virus was identified in Kazakhstan on March 13th 2020 and by March 15th President Tokayev had announced a state of emergency until May, cancelling planned celebrations for Nowruz (unlike his counterpart in Tajikistan) and Victory Day. A quarantine covering Astana and Almaty was introduced from March 19th, preventing residents from traveling outside their local areas. This was expanded into a lockdown by March 26th that prevented people from leaving their homes except to buy food or go to work, with meetings of more than three people banned and restrictions on public transport that were soon followed by restrictions on non-essential work.[19] Such measures were seen to have an impact on the initial spread of the virus but the planned reopening in May, as elsewhere in Central Asia, led to a significant spike in the number of cases that far exceeded the initial wave, leading to the reintroduction of a number of restrictions over the summer. 2021 has seen the number of cases in Kazakhstan expand dramatically with peaks in April and at time of writing that exceed the previous peaks from 2020, with the arrival of the more contagious Delta variant adding to the latest peak since mid-June. At time of writing prior to publication (as of July 14th) Kazakhstan had recorded 520,336 confirmed cases of COVID-19 with 8,173 deaths, though those numbers are expected to continue to surge due to this latest wave.[20] The current wave of COVID cases is seeing state media more openly talking about hospitals being at capacity in a bid to urge the public to change behaviour.[21] As of mid-July Kazakhstan had administered almost seven million individual vaccine doses (for a population of 18.5 million) using a mix of the Russian Sputnik, Chinese Sinopharm and Kazakhstan’s locally produced vaccine QazVac. As in most countries the political and economic impact have been severe. The impact of the pandemic and initial lockdowns pushed the economy in 2020 into recession (-2.6 per cent) for the first time since the 1998 Russian economic crisis, despite cash injections from the Government and the National Fund of Kazakhstan (the country’s oil fund). While the economy had been expected to return to growth in 2021 the impact of the most recent COVID waves are likely to slow progress. A recent report by openDemocracy and local journalists at Vlast.kz and Mediazona have shown how the pandemic has exacerbated the already heavy reliance many Kazakhstani citizens have on credit to cover the vulnerability of their family finances after years of wage stagnation, with the amount of personal loans jumping by $1.7bn in 2020.[22] The political challenges that have flowed from the crisis have come in a number of different forms. The initial response from the Ministry of Health was heavily criticised for over burdening the resources of the hospital system and other initial missteps in treatment, including drug and testing shortages. The Health Minister Yelzhan Birtanov resigned from his post in June after contracting the virus and would subsequently be arrested on corruption charges relating to longstanding allegations surrounding a major health digitalisation project called Damumed.[23] As elsewhere in Central Asia measures to restrict the spread of disinformation ended up being deployed against online critics of the Government’s response to the crisis and its wider performance.[24] For example, civic activist Alnur Ilyashev was sentenced to three years of parole-like personal restraint, 100 hours of compulsory community service, and a five year ‘freedom restriction’ ban on social and political activism following a conviction for the ‘distribution of misleading information’ that was ‘threatening to public security’ over two Facebook posts critical of the ruling Nur-Otan party, Nursultan Nazarbayev and President Kassym Zhomart-Tokayev, coming after his past efforts to create a new independent political party had previously been cracked down on.[25] COVID also provided cover for the state to intensify pressure against its existing political opponents as outlined in the sections below.[26] Other examples of misuse of the pandemic for political purposes include allegations ahead of the 2021 Mazhilis (Parliamentary) elections that officials were breaching the COVID-19 testing protocols to disrupt the work of independent election observers.[27] More overtly ahead of a proposed anti-Government rally on February 28th 2021 the city authorities in Nur-Sultan raised the pandemic threat level from amber to red, which imposed strict limits on freedom of movement, for one day only seemingly to head off the potential protest before lowering it again.[28] The situation today: Politics and protestKazakhstan’s ruling elite remains in the process of transition, with Nazarbayev slowly transferring formal powers to President Tokayev and being less visible in public, while retaining strong influence over appointments to positions within Tokayev’s administration and other arms of the Government, both nationally and locally. President Tokayev’s initial reforms have included formal abolition of the death penalty (though a moratorium had been in place since 2003) and the election of local Akims (mayors) in rural areas.[29] On this latter initiative the direct local elections for rural Akims, replacing indirect election by the maslikhats (local councils), are taking place for the first time in July 2021, with independent candidates able to stand. There is understandable hope that this will help make local Akims more accountable and responsive to their local communities, ahead of the planned rollout of the direct election model to other tiers of local Government in the coming years. However, there are prequalification requirements for candidates than include either having worked in the civil service or held a leadership role in the private sector, vague criteria that have the potential to be used to weed out potential critics.[30] Some parts of the state seem willing to engage with NGOs and other experts to consult them over proposed legislative changes, while others parts continue punitive tax investigations against them at the same time, dashing any hopes that Tokayev’s calls for reform would lead to a much wider liberalisation of the system. His framing of the ‘listening state’ aims to continue his predecessor’s approach of trying to manage complaints by ordinary citizens (while continuing to crush dissent that challenges the system) albeit now with a tone of cautious managerialism and institutionalism (at a ministry level) rather than personalisation through the office of the Presidency as under Nazarbayev. This has given greater latitude for ministries to lean into their own preferences towards reform or reaction, with the Ministry of Internal Affairs and National Security Committee being at the heart of the latter tendency. The Government’s overall approach remains broadly transactional in that the state will seek to provide stability and economic growth while the citizenry will not seek to (and not be allowed to) destabilise control by the ruling elite. For most of the post-Soviet period much of the public has remained broadly risk averse, with a middle class focused on protecting their position and wary of the risk of uncertain political change. Part of the reason for that is, as Aina Shormanbayeva and Amangeldy Shormanbayev argue in their essay, the penetration of the state and elite power structure into all aspects of life creates a huge obstacle for those wishing to challenge or hold the powerful to account. However, growing inequality and the slowed growth rates of recent years have seen a greater tendency towards protest, if not yet a wider political mobilisation. Despite putative reforms to Kazakhstan’s party system in 2010 and a formal transfer of powers to Parliament in the 2017 Constitutional reform process, genuine pluralism in Kazakhstan’s politics is conspicuously absent. No new parties have been registered since 2013 despite nine attempts to do so since the previous Parliamentary elections in 2016.[31] Although the party registration requirements have been formally reformed, such as reducing the required number of members from 40,000 to 20,000, practical challenges persist. For example, the OSCE note the retention of requirements that parties should hold a congress of more than 1,000 people, with the same number required for a party’s initiating committee, all of which require significant identity verification and the risk of pressure on those who do participate in the above. At present there is no confidence that even if new parties were to overcome these bureaucratic hurdles that they would be allowed to successfully register, with endless opportunities for bureaucratic quibbling to prevent a new party being formed. At present, partially as a function of operating a party list system, independent candidates are barred from standing for the Mazhilis. The OSCE’s Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR) which run the gold standard election observation missions in the wider region have been blunt in their assessment of the political process. In their most recent report they state that ‘the 10 January parliamentary elections in Kazakhstan lacked genuine competition and highlighted the need of the announced political reforms. They were technically prepared efficiently amid the challenges posed by the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. While five parties participated in the electoral process, and their candidates were able to campaign freely, limits imposed on the exercise of constitutionally guaranteed fundamental freedoms restrict the political space.’[32] The five parties were are allowed to stand were all ‘constructive opposition’ that broadly support the President and the current political system. As explained further below it was of little surprise that the recent spate of tax investigations into well-known NGOs took place in the run-up to the Parliamentary polls.[33] The authorities also took steps to prevent NGOs that were not explicitly founded for the purpose of conducting election observation from scrutinising the electoral process and trying to restrict those who were allowed to observe from taking photos, departing from previous practice.[34] The result saw a small drop in the vote for the ruling Nur-Otan party and a slight rise for the Ak Zhol party and the People’s Party of Kazakhstan, with a turnout (63.3 per cent) the lowest since 1999 amid the continuing pandemic and voter apathy. That the levels of pressure on those seeking to scrutinise the elections, despite Tokayev’s initial promises of political competition and the low stakes of an election where every party standing supported the Government, suggests a growing nervousness about the recent economic and social protest movement potentially bleeding through into support to more overt political opposition.[35] There are a number of extra-Parliamentary opposition groups that are at least in theory looking to fill that potential vacuum. The Nationwide Social Democratic Party (OSDP) has been the only registered party that has publically declared its opposition to Nazarbayev and now Tokayev since the mid-2000s, albeit in what Eurasianet described as a ‘highly muted and accommodationist’ manner.[36] The party ultimately decided to withdraw from the 2021 elections following a combination of internal disagreements, the continued unfair electoral terrain but also after the intervention of Muktar Ablyazov (about whom more is explained below) who called on his supporters to vote for the Social Democrats as a vehicle to register dissent with Nur-Otan (despite deriding them as a fake opposition group) and as a move that opened up the party to pressure from both sides.[37] After the OSDP’s withdrawal Ablayazov would turn his attention to calling for a tactical vote for Ak Zhol as a method of showing opposition to the Government (despite Ak Zhol’s support for Tokayev), echoing Alexi Navalny’s ‘smart vote scheme’ in Russia. In any case most of the noise and activity amongst the political opposition lies elsewhere. For the best part of the last two decades the loudest and most controversial opposition figure in the political life of Kazakhstan has been Muktar Ablyazov.[38] Ablyazov first came to prominence in the 1990s as the head of the Kazakhstan Electricity Grid Operating Company before serving an 18 month stint as Minister of Energy, Industry and Trade until October 1999. In 2001, Ablyazov and a broad array of figures from inside the ruling elite, including the Deputy Prime Minister Oraz Zhandosov, Minister of Labour Alikhan Baymenov and the Akim of Pavlodar Region Galymzhan Zhakiyanov, formed a nascent political party called Democratic Choice of Kazakhstan (known as the QDT in Kazakh or DVK in Russian) on a platform calling for further economic and political liberalisation including more powers for Parliament and the election of regional Akims (Governors).[39] Then Prime Minister Tokayev summarily fired all of the serving officials, calling them ‘plotters’, and the Government turned up the political pressure on the group’s members to the extent that the less committed would quietly return to the fold, while other less strident members of the grouping would go on to form Ak Zhol (which is now the pro-Government political party mentioned above),  some of whom would subsequently leave Ak Zhol to form a splinter party that would eventually merge with the National Social Democrats. Ablyazov however pressed on with his own party and soon found himself, in March 2002, arrested as part of a corruption investigation that had been opened but not pursued three years earlier. Initially jailed for six years Ablyazov would soon be freed after issuing a florid apology to Nazarbayev and swearing off any future political involvement. The first incarnation of Democratic Choice of Kazakhstan would be wound up in 2005. Upon his release Ablyazov ostensibly returned to his business activities, acting as Chairman of BTA Bank, which grew rapidly in the years preceding the financial crash to become Kazakhstan’s largest commercial bank. However things began to fall apart by early 2009 when the Bank was taken over by the state in the wake of a $10 billion debt being found and Ablyazov fled to London. The years that followed would see an international hunt for the missing money and disclosures in the UK and US courts about the complex web of offshore holdings through which the now state run BTA argued Ablyazov had committed an extensive fraud, but which he argued were a defence against his money being taken as persecution for his political activities. After years of wrangling, primarily in the UK Courts, lawyers on behalf of BTA secured judgements against Ablyazov demanding the return of $4.8 billion, with efforts to enforce those judgements against assets believed to be owned by Ablyazov, including luxury properties in Surrey and on the Bishop’s Avenue in London (known colloquially as Billionaires Row) and business holdings around the world that are continuing to this day.[40] In 2012 Ablyazov was found guilty of contempt of court at the High Court in London for failing to disclose details of his assets and had to flee to France where he would ultimately gain asylum.[41] However his wife and children would be briefly taken from Italy to Kazakhstan in a scandal that would subsequently see Italian police officers jailed for taking part in a de facto kidnapping and the family returned to Italy after mounting political pressure.[42] What became clear in the years that followed Ablyazov’s departure from Kazakhstan in 2009 was that, despite initial denials, he had continued to be a major financial supporter of opposition parties and media outlets in the years that followed his initial arrest. This was believed to include the unregistered Alga party, formed by former Democratic Choice members in 2005, that served as the largest opposition grouping until it was banned on grounds of extremism in 2012 in the wake of the jailing of its leader Vladimir Kozlov.[43] Koslov would be imprisoned as part of the crackdown that followed the Zhanaozen protests, though he was released in 2016 after years of international pressure over his sentencing.[44] By 2017 Ablyazov began to openly reassert himself directly into the political fray in Kazakhstan with the reestablishment of the Democratic Choice of Kazakhstan as a political movement. The revived QDT/DVK movement was formally banned as an extremist movement by March 2018, with the whole of Kazakhstan’s social media facing blockages and speed restrictions whenever Ablyazov would broadcast on Facebook Live.[45] Following the banning of Ablyazov’s party a new ‘Street Party’ or Koshe started to become active, but was itself banned on extremism grounds in June 2020 on suspicion of links to the QDT.[46] Public protests by QDT and Koshe supporters have become a notable part of the political landscape, since their involvement in and partial piggy backing on the public protests on the role of China, the 2019 Presidential election (which saw hundreds of protestors arrested) and the social issues that have being roiling in recent years.[47] They have been notable in particular because of the level of ferocity with which the Government has responded, with the movement’s designation as extremist enabling the use of laws designed for combatting terrorism and ‘extremism’ to be deployed against protestors believed to be part of the movement. Article 174 of the Criminal Code on ‘Institution of social, national, generic, racial, class or religious discord’ was used as a regular tool to arrest people, but more often in recent times Article 405 about membership of banned extremist organisations has been the tool of choice with Human Rights Watch documenting over 130 such cases.[48] The use of these laws have not just been applied to physical protestors but to anyone sharing information about the protests or about the QDT and Koshe more generally, with arrests and ‘freedom restriction’ bans on activists being deployed. While the level of anger generated by Ablyazov at the highest levels of Kazakhstan’s Government cannot be understated, most international human rights observers and Western Governments have challenged the banning orders against the QDT and Koshe on the basis that the Government of Kazakhstan is seeking to prohibit peaceful protest movements. While these groups are clearly aiming to achieve a change of government in Kazakhstan, there is not currently evidence available that the QDT and Koshe are seeking to achieve this goal through violence rather than public pressure, with the Government of Kazakhstan unwilling to share the evidence of extremism relied on in court for independent verification.[49] Given Ablyazov’s straight forward political tactic of seeking to insert himself into issues of popular protest it is difficult to gauge the proportion of the public who actively support him, rather than simply share some of his critiques of the Government, though the numbers actively involved in QDT and Koshe protests would seem to be relatively low, albeit given the level of pressure from the state on anyone who does so. Even for those who are openly supportive of the party it would seem clear that ordinary activists are people showing their frustration with the existing order rather than trying to enact a violent overthrow of the Government. Trying, but not always succeeding (literally given they regularly try to protest on similar issues of public discontent on the same days), to keep their distance from the QDT is the Democratic Party of Kazakhstan (QDP or DPT).[50] The QDP was founded in October 2019 with a mixture of older opposition figures (such as Tulegen Zhukeyev) and younger activists, led by 33 year old Janbolat Mamai, formerly a campaigning journalist with the Tribuna Newspaper before being banned from journalism for three years as a ‘freedom restriction’ in 2017 over money laundering claims that the Government said was linked to Ablyazov.[51] The party has tried to capitalise on the mood of change that flowed from the social protests and the sense that the change of the guard that took place when President Tokayev took over should actually presage more significant political change. So far it has been blocked from registering as an official party, though it did succeed in getting official permission for a protest rally in November 2020, an extremely rare occurrence.[52] While explicitly not a political party, the youth-focused social movement Oyan Kazakstan (Wake Up Kazakhstan) has been a regular presence on the streets since its founding in June 2019, leading to its members being swept up in government crackdowns on such protests.[53] Young protestors in their teens and early 20s have been protesting in support of a platform of ideas, including an end to political repression, reforming the distribution of power between the branches of government, free elections in line with international standards, and a system of self-governance at the local level.[54] Unregistered opposition groups and pro-reform social movements are not the only ones trying to make their voice heard at present. As set out above, anti-Chinese nationalist sentiments have been a major feature of political protests and concerns in recent years but Kazakhstan is also to some extent catching up with the rest of Central Asia when it comes to socially conservative activism that links to anti-Western nationalism. Efforts to pass anti-LGBTQ+ ‘propaganda’ bills in 2015 and 2018-19 were pushed back after international pressure but there are rumblings from Parliamentarians for another attempt to pass similar legislation. In her essay in this collection, Aigerim Kamidola documents the rise of ‘anti-Gender’ narratives, feeding off regional and national debates. However, it has been the recent debate about attempts to pass a bill to stop domestic violence that have stirred a nationalist and conspiracist backlash from groups online such as Unity of Conscious KZ and MOD People's Unity (that often link to regional and global networks, such as Citizen Go, promoting anti-vaccine narratives and socially conservative values on family issues).[55] Despite pledges to the contrary in 2019, as the arrest record shows, President Tokayev has not so far significantly delivered on his pledge to make it easier for people to publically protest in practice. As Colleen Wood points out in her essay, the reforms to the law on peaceful assembly passed in May 2020, that had been announced with much governmental fanfare were seen as more cosmetic than meaningful by local activists. Whilst the request process has transitioned from one of asking permission to giving advance notice in practice the authorities still have wide-ranging powers to set the location of and rearrange or cancel proposed gatherings, which have been used to keep it very difficult for protestors to hold legally sanctioned rallies.[56] It is worth noting, however, that even leaving aside some of the banned groups listed above, if an organisation is not formally registered with the Government it is not legally allowed to organise protest.[57] The continuing difficulties have left activists regularly holding single person pickets with protest signs to attempt to draw attention to their causes.[58] Restrictions in the Criminal Code against ‘providing assistance to’ illegal protests have been used to target social media users who have commented or shared information about such events, a worrying trend identified by the UN Special Rapporteur on the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association.[59] While the case for deeper reform remains urgent even within the framework of the current law there is more that could be done to create a clear guidance with list of duties that local authorities should fulfil to proactively enable peaceful protest rather than simply providing a list of demands for protestors, while both the Government of Kazakhstan and the international community should record the number of protests that have ended up being legally sanctioned. It is not only the arrests of activists that have drawn concerns from the international community but how they have been treated by police during the protests. Tatiana Chernobyl’s essay in this collection addresses the growing use of the controversial policing tactic known as kettling, adapted from earlier forms of cordoning police protest by the Metropolitan Police in the UK during protests against the WTO in 1999.[60] Although the tactic has been ruled legal in principle, by for example the European Court of Human Rights, how it its deployed and the protection of protesters contained within the ‘kettle’ remains a sensitive topic, particularly if deployed for non-violent protest in breach of OSCE guidance as Chernobyl points out.[61] At the heart of the issue is how the state perceives any unsanctioned protest as a potential threat to its control, thereby legitimating in its eyes the use of tactics more commonly deployed in higher risk situations. The wider human rights and civil society situationBeyond the heavy crackdown on opposition activists and street movements the wider situation for civil society is somewhat more mixed. Freedom House’s Freedom in the World rankings place Kazakhstan marginally above Russia and three of its Central Asian neighbours (for now Kyrgyzstan remains above it), this stems from a civil liberties score that is somewhat better than its rating for political freedom.[62] A leading Kazakhstani NGO activist described the three competing forces that shape the Kazakhstani state as: Personality (above all Nazarbayev but also leaders of Ministries and other parts of the ruling elite both in Government, Parliament and in state connected businesses with a great degree of variability of outcome depending on who is exerting influence in a particular area); Protectionism (the desire to protect the wealth and power of ruling elites and eliminate threats to the existing order); and Modernisation (actions by technocratic, often Western-educated sections of the ruling elite that seek to modernise and cautiously reform how the state and society operate within the guardrails of the political status quo). The last few months have neatly illustrated the tension between the last two trends. Firstly not only has the last year seen increased pressure on the political opposition but a campaign of targeted pressure against some of Kazakhstan’s leading NGOs, both before and immediately after the January 2021 elections, in a clear attempt to apply a chilling effect to their public activities around the vote. This included 13 leading human rights NGOs (including Kadyr-Kasiyet and the International Legal Initiative Public Foundation who have provided contributions to this collection) who were placed under investigation by the tax authorities over the reporting of their activities funded by international grants, threatening them with fines and a requirement to temporary suspend their activities.[63] Under sustained international pressure and as time passed since the January elections most of the tax cases were dropped between February and April 2021.[64] Many of these and other NGOs have faced harassment for years through the use of tough reporting requirements that can be deployed punitively to apply pressure to NGOs.[65] The legal framework was made more exacting for NGO’s through changes to the laws governing them in 2015 and 2016 that culminated in requirements to provide large amounts of detailed information about their operations and how much they both receive and spend that comes from foreign sources (with debates about the impact of fluctuating exchange rates fuelling some of the recent cases noted above).[66] However, despite the pressure they faced from the tax authorities many of these organisations were still being invited to participate in official working groups and provide advice to the Government on policy development on areas of their expertise, with further engagement with these stakeholders now taking place in the wake of President Tokayev’s latest initiative on human rights. In a Decree entitled ‘On further human rights measures in Kazakhstan’ signed on June 9th 2021 President Tokayev commits the Government to creating a human rights action plan to address the topics of:[67]
  • ‘Improving the mechanisms of interaction with the UN treaty bodies and special procedures of the UN Human Rights Council;
  • Ensuring the rights of victims of human trafficking;
  • Human rights of citizens with disabilities;
  • The elimination of discrimination against women;
  • The right to freedom of association;
  • The right to freedom of expression;
  • The human right to life and public order;
  • Increasing the efficiency of interaction with non-governmental organisations; and
  • Human rights in criminal justice and enforcement, and prevention of torture and ill-treatment.’
 Given the Government’s recent track record on a number of topics on this list most observers will treat pledges on politically contentious issues such as freedom of association and expression with a substantial degree of skepticism until proven otherwise. However, the extent of Government-civil society dialogue underway suggests there is at least hope that modest improvements may be made in other areas that do not meaningfully seek to alter the fundamental power structure. Sadly as set out here and in a number of essay contributions not all of these less political topics are necessarily uncontroversial, particularly measures that seek to address domestic violence given the nationalist backlash it is currently generating. So for those who avoid stepping over the state imposed line from civic activism into opposition politics (particularly opposition politics linked to the elite’s bête noire) there can be more room to criticise the Government on its performance and make the case for reforms within the constraints of the system. It is a strategy designed to give activists a stake, a space to exert some degree of influence (to help shape ‘institutional change over the next ten years’ as one put it) provided they do not let measured criticism cross over into explicit demands for a change of political leadership despite the rigged nature of the system. From the perspective of the state a partnership approach with civil society, designed to make the system work better in delivering outcomes for citizens rather than trying to change it makes a lot of sense, at least to the more modernising-wing of the ruling elite. ‘Modernising’ is probably the right word (rather than liberalising or democratising) to use because it is approach that seeks to maintains the status quo power structures, keeping any ‘reformism’ within clear political bounds. It is an approach illustrated by the increased funding being made available to NGOs to deliver services, a set of themes Colleen Wood’s essay in this collection reflects more on. For those unwilling to engage with the Government the situation is even tougher, whether linked to the political opposition or not, and many NGO’s find it difficult to assist political activists due to pressure, though a number of them are able to raise awareness about their cases and call for compliance with international standards at arms-length. Despite Government officials arguing that there are no political prisoners in Kazakhstan local human rights defenders put the figure at  around 20 (many of whom have been prosecuted under Article 405 for participation in banned organisations), though Amnesty International Prisoner of Conscience Max Bokayev was finally released in February 2021.[68] In a high profile case, Aset Abishev, a QDT (DVK) activist jailed for four years in 2018, was granted early release on July 14th, shortly prior to this report’s publication. Abishev had become a cause for international concern after he slit his wrists in April 2021 in protest at his treatment by prison guards.[69] Sadly the similarly high profile situation of his fellow QDT activist Dulat Agadil did not have the same ending. Agadil was arrested at his home in February 2020, for failing to respond to a request to appear in court for his activism. The longstanding activist died in police custody in what his family believe were suspicious circumstances, an event that led to protests and widespread public anger.[70] Not all of Kazakhstan’s contentious prisoner cases are new. Poet and Protestor Aron Atabek was jailed in 2007 for 18 years and remains in prison over organising a protest that led to the death of a police officer. International human rights organisations and local cultural figures have long called for Atabek’s release and argued he has faced ill-treatment (including extended periods of solitary confinement and a broken leg from the guards) particularly following the release of criticism of Nazarbayev made whilst in jail.[71] In February 2021, the European Parliament passed a hard hitting resolution criticising the deteriorating human rights situation in Kazakhstan, focused on the detention of political prisoners and the crackdown on opposition groups.[72] This does not seem to have had an impact on how the Government is continuing to approach the political opposition with the Democratic Party leaders currently facing a wave of arrests under administrative code violations at time of writing.[73] Many activists face prohibitions on their political or journalistic activity in addition to or in lieu of their custodial sentences as part of parole type provisions known as ‘freedom restriction’.[74] For example, in June 2020 civic activist Asya Tulesova was threatened with up to three years in prison for knocking the cap off a police officer in protest at how a rally was being policed. After international outcry and two months in pre-trial detention the eventual sentence was a one and a half year probation order that included ‘freedom restrictions’ on her activities.[75] Activists with links to banned groups have been given longer-terms, such as regional QDT activist Marat Duisembiev who received a three and a half year restriction.[76] Irrespective of the reason for the ‘freedom restriction’ it significantly increases the risks of a significant custodial sentence for any form of political activity, however loosely defined they may engage in during the restricted period. Its purpose is very clearly designed to chill civic and political activism without generating the backlash, particularly from the international community, that custodial sentences for these activists would generate. 

Monitoring the security situation of human rights defenders

By Public Association Kadyr-Kasiyet

 The Public Association Kadyr-Kasiyet conducts monthly monitoring of the pressure against human rights defenders in Kazakhstan. Monitoring is conducted in relation to eight broad categories of human rights defenders: human rights defenders, civil activists, lawyers, journalists, activists of trade unions, religious associations, political parties, and public figures. Each of the eight categories of activists supports, strives to protect, promote, or demonstrates how one or more fundamental human rights and freedoms can be enjoyed. This, in turn, creates an idea of what rights and freedoms are under threat. Over the course of 2020, as well as first five months of 2021, the rights under threat have been the same: freedom of peaceful assembly, association, and freedom of expression. In 2020 alone, there were 1,414 threats recorded against 684 people. Of these, the largest number of threats were received against civil society activists (482), journalists (64), political activists (48), human rights defenders (45), lawyers (24), activists of religious associations (ten), public figures (six), trade union activists (five). For five months of 2021 , more than 400 threats were made against 475 people. Analysis of the period showed the following trends:
  • The number of threats decreased due to the introduction of the state of emergency, and restrictions were used against journalists, medical workers, and activists. At the same time, the prosecution of lawyers and journalists covering events related to COVID-19 began.
  • The state of emergency has been lifted, but quarantine measures have been maintained.
  • Banned ‘parties’ the ‘Democratic Choice of Kazakhstan’ and ‘Koshe partiyasy’, which led to criminal cases and summonses for questioning of their members.
  • Despite the coronavirus outbreak and the entry into force of amendments to the law on peaceful assemblies unapproved rallies were held in Nur-Sultan, Almaty and other cities of the country and arrests were made.
  • In different cities of Kazakhstan, citizens were arrested and sentenced for a period of five days to two months and a fine of up to 70 MCI (195,000 tenge) for participating in a memorial service in the family home of the late activist Dulat Agadil.
  • Rallies for a credit amnesty, the release of political prisoners, and against the transfer of land to foreigners took place.
  • A number of non-profit organisations were ‘attacked’ by the tax authorities before the parliamentary elections.
 The security situation of human rights defenders and activists is linked and depends on events in the country. For example, in 2020, the largest number of threats was recorded in February and October. In February, Dulat Agadil died in pre-trial detention center in Nur-Sultan. Peaceful rallies in his memory of led to detentions and administrative charges in the form of fines and/or restrictions on freedom of participants. In October, the security situation was affected by a rally authorised by the authorities for political reforms and against repression. In 2021, the largest number was in January, associated with the parliamentary elections. Detentions and restrictions on the rights of election observers were observed throughout the country. Main and secondary threats: Police; Court; Temporary detention facility; Akimat; Unknown persons; Citizens; National Security Committee; Local authorities; and Tax authorities. To access the monthly monitoring reports please visit https://kkassiyet.wordpress.com/projects/projectsrt/msdef/.

 In human rights challenges that apply both within and beyond the political sphere the need to improve oversight of the police and prison system remain areas of concern. Driving culture change in policing will need reform of the Ministry of Internal Affairs and measures to provide improved oversight through a new independent police complaints body. Another potential option could be devolving certain management functions to local government as part of Tokayev’s gradual election of local Akims, though country-wide oversight mechanisms would need to remain to limit abuses taking place away from the national spotlight. Torture and ill-treatment are still major problems with the case of Azamat Orazaly, killed in police custody after steeling livestock, highlighting the ongoing problems of ill-treatment by the police.[77] The increases in alleged torture cases reported through the Government’s National Preventive Mechanism against Torture (NPM) is an ongoing concern though it may also be a reflection of improved reporting through the mechanism, though punishment of abusers remains rare and often then lenient.[78] The impact of the pandemic has exacerbated long-standing concerns about harsh and unsanitary prison conditions and aggressive treatment by prison officers.[79] As in many countries of the region the Government’s Office of the Human Rights Ombudsman, whose duties include running the NPM, would benefit from greater capacity, increased powers to hold other arms of the state accountable and greater independence from the political system. Kazakhstan has shares a number of challenges with its many of its neighbours in that the rule of law is impinged by both overly powerful and unaccountable prosecutors office (as Aina Shormanbayeva and Amangeldy Shormanbayev note in their essay) and a judiciary that lacks independence from the state and politically connected interests, despite years of internationally backed reform programmes designed to improve their performance. USAID describes the situation as ‘while well-trained and qualified judges can be found in Kazakhstan, the judicial system overall continues to suffer from (i) lack of independence of the courts, (ii) insufficient training of judges, leading to questionable decisions, (iii) a perception of bias against foreigners in disputes with the state, and (iv) corruption.’[80] As with other parts of the state the personal dimension matters greatly, with protestors able to get reviews of their family member’s cases (for non-political offenses) through the use of single person pickets and other attention raising efforts.[81] In a recognition of some of the challenges the legal system faces, businesses in Nur-Sultan’s financial centre can circumvent the domestic legal system entirely by using an English language Common Law based system headed by 88 year old former UK Chief Justice Lord Woolf and other UK legal luminaries.[82] Some hopes for gradual improvements in the situation, particularly in non-political cases, have been vested in the implementation in July 2021 of the new Administrative Procedures Code that consolidates the country’s administrative law (including civil procedure) in one place for the first time, produced under guidance from the German Government through its Development agency GIZ and the German Foundation for International Legal Cooperation (IRZ).[83] There have also been rumours that the new head of the Supreme Court is keen to see judges act more independently but there is a long way to go before such claims are proved in practice. When it comes to emerging human rights challenges Anna Gussarova’s essay in this collection highlights concerns about both the capacity of the state and its intentions when it comes to protecting the vast quantities of new personal data that have been created by the shift to digital. In response Gussarova argues the case for new laws, improved training for officials and law enforcement and greater transparency to avoid the COVID period ushering in a more intrusive surveillance state on the Chinese model. Issues relating to China’s role in Kazakhstan’s economy and its perceived strategic threat have been a significant political and social mobilising force that triggered a harsh reaction from the Government of Kazakhstan, as noted above. However, these domestically focused China issues are not the only area where the subject of China has led to a local crackdown. The persecution of the 1.5 million ethnic Kazakhs in the Xinjiang region (as well as the Uyghurs) has been a running source of political tension, with local families having relatives in the China. Protest movements swelled in 2018 on this issue and the organisation Atajurt Eriktileri (Homeland Volunteers) became a key NGO involved in the global documentation efforts following the situation in Xinjiang.[84] The Government of Kazakhstan was caught between appeasing local sentiment and heavy pressure from Beijing whose economic and political influence had been growing (and growing angered by the anti-Chinese sentiment on several fronts). In 2018 2,500 ethnic Kazakhs were allowed to leave China for Kazakhstan as a small gesture aimed at mollifying the situation. In March 2019 however Kazakhstani officials raided the offices of Atajurt and arrested its founder Serikzhan Bilash, an ethnic Kazakh born in China, on the grounds that his criticism of the Chinese Government amounted to inciting ethnic tensions.[85] Bilash was forced to accept a ‘freedom freedom’ order agreeing to cease his activism to avoid a seven year jail term, despite the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention declaring that his prosecution breached international human rights law and criticised the Article 174 of the Criminal Code (on incitement to social, national, generic, racial, class or religious discord) as being overly broad and lacking legal certainty.[86] Faced with being unable to continue his work in Kazakhstan amid pressure both from the state, through new criminal cases, and people trying to take over his YouTube channel he fled to Turkey in the summer of 2020 and then on to the United States.[87] Activism on the ground in Kazakhstan on this issue is now more muted, though small groups of women continue to protest outside the Chinese consulate in Almaty, as the police are pre-emptively targeting other activists such as Baibolat Kunbolat (who leads an unregistered successor group to Bilash’s Atajurt) who continue to attempt protests to free their loved ones in China.[88] Questions of ethnic tension do not only relate to China or Russia but a bloody outburst of violence, spiralling from a traffic incident, in February 2020 highlighted tensions between local ethnic Kazakhs and members of the small Dungan minority group. The violence left nine Dungan’s and one Kazakh dead, many more people injured and many homes and businesses in the Dungan village of Masanchi burned or damaged.[89] The incident highlighted fears that growing nationalism amongst ethnic Kazakhs has the potential to destabilise the interethnic stability that Nazarbayev put at the centre of his political project. Labour rightsAs set out above and in the essay contribution by Mihra Rittmann the labour situation, after a decade of pressure on household incomes and structural change in the economy, remains challenging. After years of struggle and Government crackdowns in the years since Zhanaozen it has become harder than ever for oil workers to organise at scale to defend their rights. Mihra Rittmann’s essay documents the depressing history of the legal cases and convictions against union leaders Larisa Kharkova, Amin Eleusinov and Nurbek Kushakbaev that included ‘freedom restriction’ bans on being involved in trade union activity. The independent confederations previously led by Larisa Kharkova, firstly the Confederation of Free Trade Unions of Kazakhstan (KSPK) and then Confederation of Independent Trade Unions of the Republic of Kazakhstan (KNPRK), were ultimately liquidated due to bureaucratic harassment despite international pressure and local protests including hunger strikes by 400 union members in 2017.[90] The largest, state recognised and state sympathetic, trade union confederation the Federation of Trade Unions of Kazakhstan (FPRK) remains suspended by the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) for failing to meet its standards on independence.[91] Erlan Baltabay, leader of the Industrial Trade Union of Fuel and Energy Workers (part of Kharkova’s KNPRK), has been in and out of jail since 2017 on a series of dubious charges, including a sentence in 2019 that combined an initial seven year jail term with a similar length ban on union activity, though after international pressure this was followed by a Presidential Pardon for the initial jail term and given a new five month conviction.[92] Though he was finally released in March 2020 his ‘freedom restriction’ on his activism remains until 2026.[93] Labour activist Erzhan Elshibayev remains in prison on a five year prison sentence after his conviction in 2019 on highly dubious charges that came in the wake of him leading protests against unemployment in Zhanaozen, which included criticisms of Nazarbayev that were subsequently shared online. This is despite a ruling of the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention calling for his immediate release and credible concerns that he is suffering abuse by prison guards.[94] Along with the stick wielded against union leaders, the carrot often deployed by the Government when trying to encourage workers to go along with state plans to ‘optimise’ the oil sector and privatise functions of oil service companies was an ‘early retirement’ scheme where they would get an upfront lump sum equivalent to 50 per cent of salary for five years. This would often be alongside support for them to retrain for other forms of work or to start their own businesses, as well as other inducements to prevent or end strike action in order to keep a lid on the potential for wider political unrest. In keeping with the Government’s philosophy of modernisation within the system they have offered training to trade unionists on how to negotiate their grievances through the labour code rather than resorting to strikes that they will continue to repress. The passage in 2020 of long-overdue amendments to the law on trade unions gave some degree of hope for the future if it were to be properly implemented. The changes, which came after repeated criticisms from the International Labour Organisation, would not force local or sectoral unions to become part of a national federation.[95] However, so far signs are not encouraging given that the Industrial Trade Union of Fuel and Energy Workers was suspended for six months in February 2021 on the basis of non-compliance with provisions of the old 2014 Trade Union law that had supposedly been removed in the 2020 amendments.[96] The lack of progress has led the ILO to continue its criticisms over Kazakhstan’s lack of implementation of its reforms at its June 2021 sitting of its Committee on the Application of Standards.[97] In line with their peers around the world workers in Kazakhstan’s gig economy, which has significantly expanded in recent years including through a significant rise in delivery services during the pandemic, have been organising to improve their pay and working conditions amid efforts by bosses to weaken them. Over the last few months couriers working for international companies Wolt and Glovo have engaged in public protests and unofficial strike action, while such protests were narrowly avoided at local firm Chocofood.[98] Attempts at unionising the couriers are ongoing despite risks of reprisals from both the companies and the Government. Media freedom Unsurprisingly, given the political tensions outlined above, Kazakhstan faces a number of media freedom challenges. The country ranks 155th out of 180 in the Reporters without Borders (RSF) 2021 World Press Freedom Index.[99] As with much else there is some degree of differentiation in the states reaction to outlets with links to the opposition and other organisations that are simply critical of it. Independent news websites such as Vlast.kz and Mediazona have been able to grow their readership and undertake hard hitting investigations, becoming more outspoken in the Tokayev-era and testing the limits of the levels of criticism the system will allow. Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL) is able to operate in the country, and is afforded some protection given US Government advocacy on its behalf, but its journalists are facing pressure when covering protests and other contentious issues. Instagram (the country’s most used social media platform) and YouTube are increasingly home to critical voices, albeit ones that often stay focused on social and economic rather than party political challenges.[100] Traditional media is much more restricted with many opposition and independent newspapers having been forced to close. Independent TV channels were squeezed off the airwaves in the late 90s after a massive hike in licensing fees and tighter bureaucratic pressure on dissenting voices.[101] After a cat and mouse game with the authorities lasting between 2002-2016 the last iterations and offshoots of Kazakhstan’s highest profile opposition-aligned newspaper Respublica were forced to close and a number of its journalists were jailed.[102] The few independent minded print outlets that remain, such as Uralskaya Nedelya in Oral and Dat in Almaty, continue to face heavy pressure. For example, Lukpan Akhmedyarov, editor of Uralskaya Nedelya, faced threats earliest this year for reporting a leak from a high profile local corruption trial.[103] Akmedyarov had previously been heavily assaulted in 2012 for his work in exposing another corruption scandal. Officials have regularly denied accreditation to independent journalists, limiting their ability to cover official government announcements and the rules have now been formally tightened requiring journalists to be pared with an official chaperone (‘a host’) when covering government events.[104] Similarly media workers have repeatedly been arrested or harassed whilst covering unsanctioned protests over recent years. Overall the Justice for Journalists Foundation recorded 24 incidents of physical attacks or threats of violence against Kazakhstani media workers in 2020, as well as a far broader range of online and bureaucratic harassment.[105] Galiya Azhenova’s essay draws attention to a number of these incidents. There are warning signs ahead for Kazakhstan’s online media. The laws on spreading misinformation during COVID have been used to chill reporting and particularly activism from online commentators with political connections.[106] The case of Temirlan Ensebek, a satirist who was detained by police and forced to close down (on charges of disinformation) his Instagram channel over parodies featuring Nazarbayev, is a reminder that while the criminal offense of defamation (slander) has been recently removed from the Criminal Code, laws against ‘insult’ (the ‘humiliation of honour and dignity of other person’) and in particular insult against government officials remain (including specific provisions, Article 373, relating to Nazarbayev as leader of the nation and his family that could have led to up to three years in prison for Ensebek).[107] Galiya Azhenova also points how the transfer of defamation from the criminal to administrative code has left local police trying to judge complex issues of free speech and therefore instigating lots of administrative cases for criticism of local officials. The Ministry of Information is preparing a new draft law on digital media (on Mass Communications) that is believed to be likely to include a definition of ‘internet resources’ thereby extending a number of different restrictions that apply in print and on television to online platforms as a way of curbing its current relative freedoms. Cashing inKazakhstan’s resource wealth have enabled many of those with access to political influence to become very wealthy, amid the scramble for oil in the mid-1990s and the subsequent boom years, perhaps few more so than First President Nazarbayev’s own family. Gauging the true extent of the family’s wealth is a difficult task but a recent investigation by RFE/RL identified at least $785 million in European and US real estate purchases made by Nazarbayev’s family members and their in-laws in six countries over a 20-year span.[108] One of the first major public debates about corruption in the ruling elite was the ‘Kazakhgate’ scandal that came to public attention in 2002 and 2003 with US Prosecutors alleging that around $80 million in funds from US oil companies were diverted into Swiss bank accounts for the use by President Nazarbayev and other leading officials in order to help win contracts on the Tengiz oilfields. The US businessman (and Counsellor to the President of Kazakhstan) James Giffen who was at the heart of the case would eventually serve no jail time after most of the charges were dropped, not because the financial transfers did not take place, but on the basis that there were reasonable grounds to believe he had been working with the CIA at the time of the affair.[109] Kazakhstani journalists who covered the story were less fortunate with one of the main investigators of the case, Sergei Duvanov, subsequently jailed on what were widely seen as fabricated rape charges and pressure was put on newspapers such Respublica that had covered the story.[110] While, as in Kazakhgate, allegations would occasionally touch Nazarbayev himself (including recently when businessman Bulat Utemuratov, alleged by US diplomats to be his financial fixer, was swept up in the ongoing saga over retrieving BTA assets from Ablyazov, with three billion USD in assets frozen by the UK courts) more often than not public discussion around the family’s wealth centred on his children and in particular the husbands of the oldest two daughters.[111] Dinara Kulibayeva and her husband Timur Kulibayev, a businessman who held many senior positions in state affiliated bodies (including the sovereign wealth fund Samruk-Kazyna) and throughout the energy industry (including sitting on the board of Russian energy giant Gazprom), have become the second richest people in Kazakhstan.[112] The Kulibayevs are known to have substantial holdings in the UK, including the former home of Prince Andrew (Sunninghill Park), a connection that would periodically be raised in the British press over allegations that the Prince did favours for Kulibayev whilst serving as UK trade envoy and over his closeness to Kulibayev’s former mistress Goga Ashkenazi.[113] More recently, in December 2000, the Financial Times alleged Kulibayev’s involvement in a scheme to siphon millions of dollars from a Chinese pipeline contract.[114] Nazarbayev’s oldest daughter Dariga Nazarbayeva has had the highest profile presence in Kazakhstan’s public life over the years and had been often touted as a potential successor to her father. After a media ownership career in the 1990s, she formally entered politics in 2003 with her own ‘Azar’ party that was elected to the Mazhilis in 2004. Her party would formally merge with her father’s Otan party to create Nur-Otan, the ruling party of Kazakhstan to this day. After sitting out the next Parliament she returned in 2012 on the Nur-Otan list, becoming the Nur-Otan Parliamentary leader and Deputy Chair of the Mazhilis from 2014-15 before becoming Deputy Prime Minister for a year and then joining the Senate in 2016. Upon Tokayev’s assentation to the Presidency Dariga would become Chair of the Senate and the formal next in line to the Presidency. Until 2007 she was married to the controversial oligarch Rakhat Aliyev, whose notorious reputation has repeatedly singed the credibility of the system over his financial dealings and links to criminality. Aliyev would ultimately be carted-off to Vienna as Ambassador to Austria and the OSCE as claims of his involvement in the murders of two bankers began to swirl.[115] He would ultimately be charged and sentenced in absentia in Kazakhstan for those crimes, alongside allegations of a further murder of opposition politician Altynbek Sarsenbayev, the suspicious death of his former mistress Anastasiya Novikova, as well as allegations of torture, kidnapping and evidence of money-laundering. Aliyev would ultimately be found hanged in an Austrian prison in 2015 while awaiting trial over the murder of the bankers.[116] The link to Aliyev was of later relevance to a high profile, and ultimately unsuccessful, case by the UK National Crime Agency that sought to use an Unexplained Wealth Order to freeze ownership of three UK homes worth £80 million belonging to Nazarbayeva and her family. The National Crime Agency had argued that the properties came from Aliyev’s ill-gotten gains but the court sided with Nazarbayeva’s position that these assets had been procured with her own money.[117] However, in the wake of the trial she was surprisingly removed as Chair of the Senate (and from the line of Presidential succession) by President Tokayev in May 2020 and it remains unclear whether this was due to the public impact of the revelations of her wealth or an internal power struggle that led to her removal. Later in 2020 further revelations of the extent of Nazarbayeva’s UK property holdings were revealed when she was found to be the owner of £140 million worth of buildings on Baker Street in Central London.[118] Despite these further revelations about the size of her personal wealth she made her return to Kazakhstani politics in January 2021 by returning to the Mazhils as a Nur-Otan parliamentarian.[119] As the situation of Nazarbayev’s daughters and indeed Muktar Ablyazov shown above illustrate the UK is a major external venue for the investments and entanglements of Kazakhstan’s elite. Recent analysis has shown that Kazakhstan was one of the major beneficiaries of the UK’s Tier one Investor visa system (or Golden Visas as they are known) with 205 Kazakhstani’s gain UK residency in the period 2008-2015 (the fifth most common country and the largest per capita excluding microstates).[120] While luxury property market may act as a store of wealth from Kazakhstan it is worth noting that according to the UK Government’s most recent figures Foreign Direct Investment from Kazakhstan into the UK totalled less than one million pounds in 2019.[121] The former first family are far from only people with political connections in being able to make their fortunes in post-Independence Kazakhstan. Just to cite one indicative example, RFE/RL recently exposed how former high ranking officials in the Education Ministry, particularly the family of Bakhytzhan Zhumagulov, own most of Kazakhstan’s for-profit colleges and universities.[122] Access to political influence over sectors of the economy have led to opportunities for officials, their families and associates to enrich themselves. ReligionAs with so many issues in Kazakhstan the state’s approach to religion is rooted in its desire to main stability, both between its citizenry and of the system as a whole. Kazakhstan is a predominantly Muslim Country (72 per cent) but given the residual size of its Russian population Orthodox Christianity retains a significant toe hold (23 per cent) alongside other religions linked to smaller minority groups.[123] So as a result of the post-Independence demographics and Nazarbayev’s own vision of the nation, Islamic identity played less of a role than in its Central Asian neighbours as a building block of Kazakhstani national identity (as indeed did the initial reticence to conflate Kazakhstan’s nation-building project with ethnic Kazakh identity, though it would be infused with Kazakh folk symbolism such as the Samruk bird). As such Kazakhstan’s constitution does not make any reference to Islam or any other specific religion, retaining its secular status.[124] Kazakhstan has used this approach religion as a key part of its nation branding not only internally but on the world stage. Since 2003, Kazakhstan has hosted a Nazarbayev-centric interfaith initiative known as the Congress of Leaders of World and Traditional Religions that brings together senior figures from larger ‘mainstream’ or ‘traditional’ denominations of world religions.[125] It preaches mutual toleration and understanding for the mainstream institutions that the Government of Kazakhstan believes it can do business with at a domestic level and use strategically at an international level to promote an image of tolerance and peace, as well as a role for Kazakhstan (and Nazarbayev personally) as a convenor to promote those goals. For religious groups that fall outside the ‘traditional mainstream’ however it can be much tougher. As a result Kazakhstan can find itself lauded by international actors for promoting religious tolerance, while simultaneously being recommended for placement on the State Department’s Special Watch List for Religious Freedom by the US Commission on International Religious Freedom (albeit the State Department has not given yet it this designation).[126] The challenge in Kazakhstan, as in the secular world, is with the issue of unregistered groups where the state makes it hard to register and cracks down on anything that is not. Kazakhstan’s 2011 Law on Religious Activity and Religious Associations set stringent requirements on what types of groups could be registered and how, with a minimum of 50 Kazakhstani citizens required to set up a local religious organisation through to at least 5,000 members (with 300 in each oblast as well as in Almaty, Nur-Sultan and Shymkent) to set up a national organisation.[127] There are also heavy restrictions on proselytisation, such as requirements that religious materials can only be distributed on the premises of a registered religious groups, which have been seen to target Jehovah’s Witnesses and evangelical protestant groups. There has, however, been a downward trend in the number of administrative offenses recorded each year in relation to this law, with 139 cases reported in 2020 down from 284 in 2017 according to the religious freedom organisation Forum 18.[128] The newly independent state built on the legacy of Soviet religious management and registration by creating the Spiritual Association of Muslims of Kazakhstan under which all registered mosques are affiliated. Wearing of the hijab in schools is restricted through the widespread application of school uniform policy preventing the wearing of religious symbols.[129] As elsewhere in the region concerns about religious radicalisation stem both from concerns about the risk of terrorism and from the growth of groups that fall outside of the state’s control. Non-violent extremist groups such as Tablighi Jamaat and Hizb ut-Tahrir are banned and the use of the term ‘extremist’ has been used widely in arrests of government critics (both religious and secular) without proven ties to violence. Women’s and LGBTQ+ rightsIn terms of women’s political leadership in Kazakhstan’s the OSCE note that ‘women held only one out of 17 (regional) Akim and two out of 22 ministerial positions’ at the time of the January 2021 Parliamentary elections. Despite the introduction of a 30 per cent quota the number of women in the newly elected Mazhilis actually fell from 29 to 28 seats.[130] As noted above and in the essay by Dr Khalida Azhigulova efforts to introduce new legislation focused on improving women’s rights have met with push back from socially conservative forces. At the moment the legislation on tackling domestic violence in Kazakhstan is weak, with cases usually dealt with under the administrative code (for minor offenses) rather than Criminal Code (which is used only for severe assaults), leading to a situation where the penalties for dropping a cigarette on the street (classified as petty hooliganism) are harsher than for most domestic violence cases.[131] In 2020, 45,000 cases of domestic violence were initiated through the administrative code but is far lower than the true extent of the situation due to under reporting and even then more than 60 per cent of the cases are withdrawn before a ruling is made due to pressure for family reconciliation.[132] It is positive that President Tokayev has recommitted to a law on domestic violence as part of his recent Human Rights Decree but the details remain likely to be keenly fought over, such as whether ‘minor beatings’ would become a criminal offense or not.[133] Attempts to bring in laws against sexual harassment have stalled under pressure from the similar social conservative forces. International Women’s day (March 8th) has often been a flashpoint between women’s rights activists and socially conservative forces across Central Asia. In a positive step in 2021 the Women’s March was given permission by the city authorities in Almaty for the first time and between 500-1,000 women’s rights activists were able to protest in what has been described as Kazakhstan’s largest women’s march.[134] However, the state remains reticent to allow groups undertaking more ‘radical’ advocacy on both women’s and LGBTQ+ rights to get a hearing. The group Feminata has been repeatedly denied official registration and its leaders were recently attacked by unknown assailants in Shymkent whilst holding a private meeting on gender equality before being detained by police ‘for their own safety’.[135] More broadly for LGBTQ+ Kazakhstanis the situation remains tough. Homosexuality was decriminalised in 1998 (unlike in Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan) but the legal frameworks to protect the community are piecemeal (based on generalised anti-discrimination provisions in the Constitution) and cultural attitudes remain deeply hostile in large segments of society.[136] In 2015 and 2018-19 attempts were made by the Government to introduce a Russian style law on ‘propaganda’ about ‘non-traditional sexual orientation’ that would have restricted the ability for members of the LGBTQ+ community and rights activists to speak openly about their concerns.[137] These efforts were pushed back after both local campaigning and pressure from Kazakhstan’s western partners, but there are concerns efforts will be made in Parliament to try again in the near future. Aigerim Kamidola’s essay highlights current measures to past a draft Law ‘On the Introduction of Amendments and Additions to Some Legislative Acts of the Republic of Kazakhstan on Family and Gender Policy’ that would remove the term gender from existing the anti-discrimination law and replace it with ‘equality on the basis of sex’. This move taps into narratives that have seen the concept of gender stigmatised both as a general label attached to LGBTQ+ and Women’s rights (‘gender ideology’) by illiberal or anti-Western ‘anti-Gender’ campaigners across the post-Soviet space, as well as being used in a more narrow sense as to specific debates around rights and protections for transgender people. International influenceKazakhstan has so far successfully pursued a multi-vector foreign policy that has enabled it to negotiate tricky regional relationships and project a positive image of the country on the world stage Kazakhstan. The country has remained part of the Moscow-oriented post-Soviet regional infrastructure such as the Commonwealth of Independent States, the Collective Security Treaty Organisation and more recently the Eurasian Economic Union. Despite the somewhat fraught domestic political challenges China has been steadily growing its influence with over 18 per cent of Kazakhstan’s total trade and almost five per cent of its total inward investment, as well as a deepening security relationship that includes membership of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation.[138] For a long-time under President Nazarbayev Kazakhstan assumed a regional leadership role within and to some extent on behalf of Central Asia, though in recent years Uzbekistan’s President Mirziyoyev has ended his country’s virtual isolation and the regional balance is somewhat more evenly split between the region’s most populous country (Uzbekistan) and its richest (Kazakhstan). At the same time, Kazakhstan has dramatically deepened its economic ties to the West as touched on above. The EU is Kazakhstan’s largest external trading partner, accounting for 30 per cent of its external trade, and the country is the first in Central Asia to conclude a new Enhanced Partnership and Cooperation Agreement (EPCA) which came into force in 2020. The EU institutions have tended to raise human rights and governance issues within the confines of its formal human rights dialogue processes, though the European Parliament has often been more vocal on these issues despite ratifying the EPCA.[139] The OSCE has always been an important part of Kazakhstan’s diplomatic initiatives with Kazakhstan holding the chairmanship in office in 2010 and using the opportunity to host a rare summit of the organisation’s heads of Government (it was the last time such an event has taken place, with the next most recent OSCE summit taking place in 1999).[140] As a sign of Kazakhstan’s continuing involvement Former Foreign Minister Kairat Abdrakhmanov became the High Commissioner on National Minorities (HCNM) in December 2020. Other initiatives to put Kazakhstan (and particularly Astana, now Nur-Sultan) on the map include the Congress of Leaders of World and Traditional Religions as noted above and the ‘Astana process’ which has seen Kazakhstan host peace talks over the Syrian crisis since 2017. Kazakhstan’s position as a relatively prosperous, well connected country with a broad base to its international relations means that there are some opportunities for international influence over the trajectory of its performance on human rights issues but these should not be overstated. Its leadership, and particularly a number of younger generation of officials and leaders, care about Kazakhstan’s reputation, something it has worked hard to promote internationally as a good partner and modern country. There is an ongoing desire from Kazakhstan to continue to receive foreign investment and support, particularly as the world transitions away from fossil fuels. However, it is far from clear that these considerations outweigh the desire to maintain the political and economic status quo, particularly amongst the upper echelons of the state and particularly the security apparatus. Image by Jussi Toivanen under (CC). [1] Francisco Olmos, State-building myths in Central Asia, Foreign Policy Centre, October 2019, https://fpc.org.uk/state-building-myths-in-central-asia/[2] Wudan Yan, The nuclear sins of the Soviet Union live on in Kazakhstan, Nature, April 2019, https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01034-8[3] Institute of Demography named after A.G. Vishnevsk National Research University Higher School of Economics, 1989 All-Union Population Census National composition of the population in the republics of the USSR: Kazakh SSR, http://www.demoscope.ru/weekly/ssp/sng_nac_89.php?reg=5[4] Alimana Zhanmukanova, Is Northern Kazakhstan at Risk to Russia?, The Diplomat, April 2021, https://thediplomat.com/2021/04/is-northern-kazakhstan-at-risk-to-russia/; RFE/RL, A Tale Of Russian Separatism In Kazakhstan, August 2014, https://www.rferl.org/a/qishloq-ovozi-kazakhstan-russian-separatism/25479571.html[5] CIA World Factbook, Kazakhstan, https://www.cia.gov/the-world-factbook/countries/kazakhstan/#people-and-society[6] Alimana Zhanmukanova, Is Northern Kazakhstan at Risk to Russia?, The Diplomat, April 2021, https://thediplomat.com/2021/04/is-northern-kazakhstan-at-risk-to-russia/[7] The World Bank, GDP growth (annual per cent) – Kazakhstan, https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.MKTP.KD.ZG?locations=KZ[8] IEA, Kazakhstan energy profile, April 2020, https://www.iea.org/reports/kazakhstan-energy-profile[9] Maurizio Totaro, Collecting beetles in Zhanaozen: Kazakhstan’s hidden tragedy, openDemocracy, May 2021, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/yrysbek-dabei-zhanaozen-kazakhstans-hidden-tragedy/[10] Abdujalil Abdurasulov, Kazakhstan's land reform protests explained, April 2016, https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-36163103[11] UN Human Rights, “Kazakhstan should release rights defenders Bokayev and Ayan” – UN experts, December 2016, https://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=20990&LangID=E; Sarah McCloskey, Why Kazakh political prisoner Max Bokayev should be released, openDemocracy, April 2019, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/why-kazakh-political-prisoner-max-bokayev-should-be-released/[12] Catherine Putz, Kazakhstan Cracks Down on Weekend Protests, The Diplomat, May 2016  https://thediplomat.com/2016/05/kazakhstan-cracks-down-on-weekend-protests/; Eurasianet, Kazakhstan Takes Autocratic Turn With Mass Detentions, May 2016, https://eurasianet.org/kazakhstan-takes-autocratic-turn-mass-detentions[13] Catherine Putz, Kazakhstan Bans Sale of Agricultural Lands to Foreigners, The Diplomat, May 2021, https://thediplomat.com/2021/05/kazakhstan-bans-sale-of-agricultural-lands-to-foreigners/[14] David Trilling, China’s water use threatens Kazakhstan’s other big lake, Eurasianet, March 2021, https://www.intellinews.com/china-s-water-use-threatens-kazakhstan-s-other-big-lake-207026/[15] RFE/RL Kazakh Service, Dozens Of Mothers Protest In Kazakhstan Demanding Government Support, February 2019, https://www.rferl.org/a/dozens-of-mothers-protest-in-kazakhstan-demanding-government-support/29759290.html; RFE/RL Kazakh Service, Angry Kazakh Mothers Demand Reforms After Five Girls Die In House Fire, February 2019,  https://www.rferl.org/a/angry-kazakh-mothers-demand-reforms-after-five-girls-die-in-house-fire/29771963.html[16] The move also came 30 years after his elevation to become First Secretary of the Communist party.[17] Paolo Sorbello, Kazakhstan celebrates its leader with two more statues, Global Voices, July 2021,  https://globalvoices.org/2021/07/06/kazakhstan-celebrates-its-leader-with-two-more-statues/; Andrew Roth, Oliver Stone derided for film about ‘modest’ former Kazakh president, The Guardian, July 2021, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jul/11/oliver-stone-film-ex-kazakhstan-president-nursultan-nazabayev; Joanna Lillis, Kazakhstan’s golden man gets the Oliver Stone treatment, Eurasianet, July 2021,  https://eurasianet.org/kazakhstans-golden-man-gets-the-oliver-stone-treatment[18] Catherine Putz, Kazakhstan Remains Nazarbayev’s State, The Diplomat, October 2019, https://thediplomat.com/2019/10/kazakhstan-remains-nazarbayevs-state/[19] Global Monitoring, COVID-19 pandemic – Kazakhstan, https://global-monitoring.com/gm/page/events/epidemic-0001994.sOJcVU487awH.html?lang=en[20] World Health Organisation, COVID-19 Kazakhstan, https://covid19.who.int/region/euro/country/kz[21] Qazaqstan TV News, Doctors of the capital showed the situation inside the hospital, July 2021, https://qazaqstan.tv/news/143209/[22] William Tompson Twitter post, Twitter, April 2021, https://twitter.com/william_tompson/status/1385102759117180931?s=20; Dmitriy Mazorenko, Dariya Zheniskhan and Almas Kaisar, Kazakhstan is caught in a vicious cycle of debt. The pandemic has only made it worse, openDemocracy, June 2021, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/kazakhstan-caught-vicious-cycle-debt-pandemic-has-only-made-it-worse/[23] Bagdat Asylbek, Diagnosis: "devastation". Kazakhstani health care and pandemic, Radio Azattyq, August 2020, https://rus.azattyq.org/a/kazakhstan-coronavirus-national-health-system/30768857.html; Almaz Kumenov, Kazakhstan: Former health minister arrested, Eurasianet, November 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kazakhstan-former-health-minister-arrested[24] Bakhytzhan Toregozhina, Pandemic and Human Rights: Only Repressive System is Functioning in Kazakhstan, Cabar Central Asia, July 2020, https://cabar.asia/en/pandemic-and-human-rights-only-repressive-system-is-functioning-in-kazakhstan?pdf=36177. Though Kazakhstan already had laws in place against ‘disinformation’ that were able to be used.[25] Madina Aimbetova, Freedom of expression in Kazakhstan still a distant prospect, says prosecuted activist, Global Voices, July 2020, https://globalvoices.org/2020/07/15/freedom-of-expression-in-kazakhstan-still-a-distant-prospect-says-jailed-activist/[26] IPHR, Kazakhstan: Massive restrictions on expression during Covid-19; sudden banning of peaceful opposition, August 2020, https://www.iphronline.org/kazakhstan-massive-restrictions-on-expression-during-covid-19-sudden-banning-of-peaceful-opposition.html;Asim Kashgarian, Rights Groups: Kazakh Authorities Use Coronavirus to Smother Political Dissent, VOA News, November 2020, https://www.voanews.com/extremism-watch/rights-groups-kazakh-authorities-use-coronavirus-smother-political-dissent[27] Jeff Bell, Twitter post, Twitter, January 2021, https://twitter.com/ImJeffBell/status/1347934173433106435?s=20[28] Almaz Kumenov, Kazakhstan: Authorities use pandemic to quash protests, Eurasianet, March 2021, https://eurasianet.org/kazakhstan-authorities-use-pandemic-to-quash-protests[29] DW, Kazakhstan abolishes death penalty, January 2021, https://www.dw.com/en/kazakhstan-abolishes-death-penalty/a-56117176[30] Radio Azattyk, Direct elections of rural akims: the campaign has not started yet, but obstacles are already being raised, May 2021, https://rus.azattyq.org/a/31240547.html[31]OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights, Parliamentary Elections, January 2021, https://www.osce.org/odihr/elections/kazakhstan/470850[32] OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights, Parliamentary Elections, January 2021, https://www.osce.org/odihr/elections/kazakhstan/470850[33] Joanna Lillis, Kazakhstan: Civil society complains of pre-election pressure, Eurasianet, December 2020,   https://eurasianet.org/kazakhstan-civil-society-complains-of-pre-election-pressure[34] Almaz Kumenov, Kazakhstan: Nervous authorities keep election observers at arm’s length, Eurasianet, January 2021, https://eurasianet.org/kazakhstan-nervous-authorities-keep-election-observers-at-arms-length[35] The Economist, All the parties in Kazakhstan’s election support the government, January 2021, https://www.economist.com/asia/2021/01/09/all-the-parties-in-kazakhstans-election-support-the-government[36] Almaz Kumenov, Kazakhstan: Nervous authorities keep election observers at arm’s length, Eurasianet, January 2021, https://eurasianet.org/kazakhstan-nervous-authorities-keep-election-observers-at-arms-length[37] RFE/RL, Kazakh Opposition Figure Calls On Supporters To Vote To Expose 'Opposition' Party, November 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakh-opposition-figure-calls-on-supporters-to-vote-to-expose-opposition-party/30956477.html[38] For a good summation of the history of the history of this case see the chapter in Joanna Lillis, Dark Shadows: Inside the Secret World of Kazakhstan, IB Taurus, October 2018.[39] Ibid.[40] Hogan Lovells, Hogan Lovells Secures Major High Court Victory for BTA Bank in US $6bn Fraud Case, August 2018, https://www.hoganlovells.com/en/news/hogan-lovells-secures-major-high-court-victory-for-bta-bank-in-us-6bn-fraud-case[41] Rupert Neate, Arrest warrant for Kazakh billionaire accused of one of world's biggest frauds, The Guardian, February 2012, https://www.theguardian.com/business/2012/feb/16/arrest-warrant-kazakh-billionaire-mukhtar-ablyazov[42] RFE/RL Kazakh Servicem Italian Officials Imprisoned Over 'Unlawful' Deportation Of Former Kazakh Banker's Wife, Daughter, October 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/30895138.html[43] Dmitry Solovyov and Robin Paxton, Kazakhstan in move to ban opposition parties and media, Reuters, November 2012,  https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-kazakhstan-opposition-idUKBRE8AK0SE20121121; Human Rights House, Kazakhstan opposition leader sentenced in politically motivated trial, October 2012, https://humanrightshouse.org/articles/kazakhstan-opposition-leader-sentenced-in-politically-motivated-trial/[44] Vladimir Kozlov, https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Vladimir_Kozlov_(politician)#[45] Almaz Kumenov, Kazakhstan is throttling the internet when the president’s rival is online, Eurasianet, July 2018, https://eurasianet.org/kazakhstan-is-throttling-the-internet-when-the-presidents-rival-is-online[46] Manshuk Asautay, Activists demanded the removal of the "Street Party" from the list of banned organisations, Radio Azattyq, https://www.azattyq.org/a/31318167.htm;l RFE/RL Kazakh Service, Kazakh Activists Start Hunger Strike To Protest Opposition Party Ban, June 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakh-hunger-strike-koshe-party/31318852.html[47] RFE/RL Kazakh Service, Hundreds Rally In Kazakhstan To Protest Growing Chinese Influence, March 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakhstan-almaty-anti-china-rally-arrests/31172559.html; Joanna Lillis, Nazarbayev ally wins big in Kazakhstan election after hundreds arrested, The Guardian, June 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jun/09/hundreds-arrested-as-kazakhs-protest-against-rigged-election; See footage here via Maxim Eristavi’s Twitter feed: https://twitter.com/MaximEristavi/status/1348182003351511042?s=20[48] Andrey Grishin, When Kazakhstan Will Stop Making “Extremists” of Ordinary People? CABAR Central Asia, March 2020, https://cabar.asia/en/when-kazakhstan-will-stop-making-extremists-of-ordinary-people; Legislationline, Criminal codes – Kazakhstan, https://www.legislationline.org/documents/section/criminal-codes/country/21/Kazakhstan/show; Article 405 of the Criminal Code states - ‘Organisation and participation in activity of public or religious association or other organisation after court decision on prohibition of their activity or liquidation in connection with carrying out by them the extremism or terrorism’; Human Rights Watch, Kazakhstan: Crackdown on Government Critics, July 2021, https://www.hrw.org/news/2021/07/07/kazakhstan-crackdown-government-critics; From Our Member Dignity – Kadyr-kassiyet (KK) from Kazakhstan and Bir Duino from Kyrgyzstan – Anti-Extremist Policies in Russia, Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic and Tajikistan. Comparative Review, Forum-Asia, April 2020 https://www.forum-asia.org/?p=31521[49] Human Rights Watch, Kazakhstan: Crackdown on Government Critics, July 2021, https://www.hrw.org/news/2021/07/07/kazakhstan-crackdown-government-critics; European Parliament, RC-B9-0144/2021, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/RC-9-2021-0144_EN.html[50] For example both groups chose to protest on Capital day this year, despite meeting at different times both were swept up in the same rounds of ‘preventative’ arrests. See Joanna Lillis, Twitter post, Twitter, July 2021, https://twitter.com/joannalillis/status/1412272738547421187?s=20[51] RFE/RL’s Kazakh Service, Kazakh Journalist Convicted Of Money Laundering, Walks Free In ‘Huge Victory’, September 2017, https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakh-journalist-mamai-convicted-money-laundering-ablyazov/28721897.html[52] RFE/RL’s Kazakh Service, Kazakh Activist Demands Registration Of Party Before Parliamentary Vote, November 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakh-activist-demands-registration-of-party-before-parliamentary-vote/30942877.html; RFE/RL’s Kazakh Service, Kazakh Opposition Group Allowed To Hold Rally Challenging Upcoming Polls, November 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakh-opposition-group-allowed-to-hold-rally-challenging-upcoming-polls/30933581.html; Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Twitter post, Twitter, November 2020, https://twitter.com/RFERL/status/1327704146221412352[53] Bruce Pannier, Hectic Times in Kazakhstan Recently, And For The Foreseeable Future, RFE/RL, June 2019, https://www.rferl.org/a/hectic-times-in-kazakhstan-recently-and-for-the-foreseeable-future/30000862.html[54] Colleen Wood, New Civic Movement Urges Kazakhstan to ‘Wake Up’, The Diplomat, June 2019, https://thediplomat.com/2019/06/new-civic-movement-urges-kazakhstan-to-wake-up/[55] Medet Yesimkhanov, Pavel  Bannikov and Asem Zhapisheva, Dossier: Who is behind lobbying for the abolitions of laws and the spread of conspiracy theories in Kazakhstan, Factcheck.kz, February 2021, https://factcheck.kz/socium/dose-kto-stoit-za-lobbirovaniem-otmeny-zakonov-i-rasprostraneniem-konspirologii-v-kazaxstane/; Medet Yesimkhanov, Dossier: CitizenGO – an ultra-conservative lobby disguised as a petition site, Factcheck.kz, November 2020, https://factcheck.kz/v-mire/dose-citizengo-ultrakonservativnoe-lobbi-pod-vidom-ploshhadki-dlya-peticij/[56] Mihra Rittmann, Kazakhstan’s ‘Reformed’ Protest Law Hardly an Improvement, Human Rights Watch, May 2020, https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/05/28/kazakhstans-reformed-protest-law-hardly-improvement[57] Legislation Online, On the procedure for organising and holding peaceful assemblies in the Republic ofKazakhstan, May 2020, https://www.legislationline.org/download/id/8924/file/Kazakhstan%20-%20Peaceful%20assemblies%20EN.pdf[58] Mihra Rittmann, Kazakhstan’s ‘Reformed’ Protest Law Hardly an Improvement, Human Rights Watch, May 2020, https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/05/28/kazakhstans-reformed-protest-law-hardly-improvement[59] Human Rights Council, Rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association, United Nations General Assembly, May 2019, https://undocs.org/en/A/HRC/41/41[60] Indymedia UK, A brief history of “kettling”, November 2010, https://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/2010/11/468945.html As described by the OSCE, kettling (or corralling) is a ‘strategy of crowd control that relies on containment […], where law enforcement officials encircle and enclose a section of assembly participants.’[61] Paul Lewis, Human rights court backs police ‘kettling’, The Guardian, March 2012, https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2012/mar/15/human-rights-court-police-kettling[62] Freedom House, Countries and Territories, https://freedomhouse.org/countries/freedom-world/scores?sort=desc&order=Total%20Score%20and%20Status[63] Front Line Defenders, Authorities pressurize human rights groups – Kazakhstan, December 2020, https://www.frontlinedefenders.org/ru/statement-report/human-rights-groups-under-pressure-kazakhstan?fbclid=IwAR2g_4jdv1OeFfSHHc92lmuVz11RnJxNYdFbl2FqEggOm8gpRlnH7A-_vjg; ACCA, Kazakhstan may suspend the activities of the International Journalism Center, January 2021, https://acca.media/en/kazakhstan-may-suspend-the-activities-of-the-international-journalism-center/; Almaz Kumenov, Kazakhstan: Government’s war on NGOs claims more victims, Eurasianet, January 2021, https://eurasianet.org/kazakhstan-governments-war-on-ngos-claims-more-victims[64] RFE/RL’s Kazakh Service, Kazakh Authorities Drop Changes Against NGOs After Outcry, February 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakh-authorities-drop-charges-ngos-outcry/31087863.html; Bagdat Asylbek, Human Rights Bureau and NGO Echo won lawsuits against tax service, Radio Azattyq, April 2021, https://rus.azattyq.org/a/31190073.html[65] OMCT, Harassment on the part of the Kazakh tax authorities against human rights NGOs international legal initiative, June 2021, https://www.omct.org/en/resources/urgent-interventions/harassment-on-the-part-of-the-kazakh-tax-authorities-against-human-rights-ngo-international-legal-initiative; Human Rights Watch, Kazakhstan: Rights Groups Harassed, February 2017, https://www.hrw.org/news/2017/02/22/kazakhstan-rights-groups-harassed[66] ICNL, Kazakhstan, May 2021, https://www.icnl.org/resources/civic-freedom-monitor/kazakhstan[67] Government of Kazakhstan, President Tokayev Signs a Decree on Further Measures of the Republic of Kazakhstan in the Field of Human Rights, June 2021, https://www.gov.kz/memleket/entities/mfa-delhi/press/news/details/215657?lang=kk[68] ACCA, Expert: there are no political prisoners in Kazakhstan, but they are, July 2021, https://acca.media/en/expert-there-are-no-political-prisoners-in-kazakhstan-but-they-are/[69] RFE/RL’s Kazakh Service, Jailed Kazakh Political Prisoner In Solitary After Slitting Wrists, Rights Group Says, RFE/RL, April 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/jailed-kazakh-political-prisoner-in-solitary-after-slitting-wrists-rights-group-says/31193040.html; EU in Kazakhstan, Twitter post, Twitter, April 2021, https://twitter.com/EUinKazakhstan/status/1380141287760859141; RFE/RL Kazakh Service, Jailed Opposition Activist Unexpectedly Granted Early Release, July 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakh-activist-abishev-release/31359606.html[70] U.S. Department of State, 2020 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices: Kazakhstan, https://www.state.gov/reports/2020-country-reports-on-human-rights-practices/kazakhstan/; Chris Rickleton, Kazakhstan: Activist dies in detention, piling pressure on the authorities, Eurasianet, February 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kazakhstan-activist-dies-in-detention-piling-pressure-on-the-authorities[71] RFE/RL’s Kazakh Service, Kazakh Writers Urge President To Release Dissident Poet Atabek, RFE/RL, February 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakh-writers-urge-president-to-release-dissident-poet-atabek/31121177.html; English PEN, Kazakhstan: take action for imprisoned poet Aron Atabek, https://www.englishpen.org/posts/campaigns/kazakhstan-take-action-for-imprisoned-poet-aron-atabek/[72] European Parliament, RC-B9-0144/2021, https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/RC-9-2021-0144_EN.html[73] Kazakhstan International Bureau for Human Rights and Rule of Law, Dostiyarov was reportedly beaten, July 2021, https://bureau.kz/kk/ysty%d2%9b/belsendi-dostiyarovtyng-soqqygha-zhyghylghany-habarlandy/[74] ACCA, Expert: people are deprived of civil and political rights in Kazakhstan, May 2021, https://acca.media/en/expert-people-are-deprived-of-civil-and-political-rights-in-kazakhstan/[75] IPHR, Kazakhstan: Massive restrictions on expressions during COVID-19; sudden banning of peaceful opposition, August 2020, https://www.iphronline.org/kazakhstan-massive-restrictions-on-expression-during-covid-19-sudden-banning-of-peaceful-opposition.html; IPHR, Kazakhstan: Free civil rights defender Asya Tulesova, June 2020, https://www.iphronline.org/kazakhstan-free-civil-rights-defender-asya-tulesova.html; RFE/RL’s Kazakh Service, Kazakh Court Convicts Activist Charged With Assaulting Police, August 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakh-court-convicts-activist-charged-with-assaulting-police/30779401.htmlIPHR, Kazakhstan: Free civil rights defender Asya Tulesova, June 2020, https://www.iphronline.org/kazakhstan-free-civil-rights-defender-asya-tulesova.html[76] RFE/RL, Kazakh Activist Receives Sentence For Links With Banned Political Group, December 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/another-kazakh-activist-receives-parole-like-sentence-for-links-with-banned-political-group/31015204.html[77] Asemgul Mukhitovna, A resident of Makanchi died at the police station. A case was initiated under the article “Torture”, Radio Azattyq, October 2020, https://www.azattyq.org/a/30900922.html[78] U.S. Department of State, 2020 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices: Kazakhstan,  https://www.state.gov/reports/2020-country-reports-on-human-rights-practices/kazakhstan/; Human Rights Commissioner in the Republic of Kazakhstan, https://www.gov.kz/memleket/entities/ombudsman/activities/1030?lang=en[79] See State Department ibid and ACCA, Kazakhstan: tired of bullying, convict threatens to hang himself, March 2021, https://acca.media/en/kazakhstan-tired-of-bullying-convict-threatens-to-hang-himself/[80] Duke University, Kazakhstan Rule of Law project, January 2020, https://researchfunding.duke.edu/kazakhstan-rule-law-project[81] Saniyash Toyken, A group of people who demanded a meeting with Asanov spent the night in the building of the Supreme Court, Radio Azattyq, June 2021, https://www.azattyq.org/a/31310280.html[82] Court, An Introduction, https://court.aifc.kz/an-introduction/[83] Christian Schaich and Christian Reitemeier, The Republic of Kazakhstan’s New Administrative Procedures Code, ZOIS, June 2021, https://en.zois-berlin.de/publications/the-republic-of-kazakhstans-new-administrative-procedures-code; Code of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Administrative Procedural and Procedural Code of the Republic of Kazakhstan, (with changes as of 01.07.2021), https://online.zakon.kz/Document/?doc_id=35132264#pos=1;-13[84] Mehmet Volkan Kasikci, Documenting the Tragedy in Xinjiang: An Insider’s View of Atajurt, The Diplomat, January 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/01/documenting-the-tragedy-in-xinjiang-an-insiders-view-of-atajurt/[85] Reid Standish, Astana Tried to Silence China Critics, Foreign Policy, March 2019, https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/03/11/uighur-china-kazakhstan-astana/[86] Agence France-Presse, Xinjiang activist freed in Kazakh court after agreeing to stop campaigning, The Guardian, August 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/aug/17/xinjiang-activist-freed-in-kazakh-court-after-agreeing-to-stop-campaigning; Freedom Now, Kazakhstan: UN Declares Detention of Human Rights Activist Serikzhan Bilash a Violation of International Law, November 2020, https://www.freedom-now.org/kazakhstan-un-declares-detention-of-human-rights-activist-serikzhan-bilash-a-violation-of-international-law/[87] Bruce Pannier, Activist Defending Ethnic Kazakhs In China Explains Why He Had To Flee Kazakhstan, RFE/RL, January 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/31051495.html[88] Reid Standish and Aigerim Toleukhanova, Kazakh Activism Against China's Internment Camps Is Broken, But Not Dead, April 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakhstan-protests-china-xinjiang-rights-abuses/31186209.html[89] Joanna Lillis, Kazakhstan’s Dugan community stunned by spasm of deadly bloodletting, February 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kazakhstans-dungan-community-stunned-by-spasm-of-deadly-bloodletting; Joanna Lillis, Kazakhstan: Trial over deadly ethnic violence leaves bitter taste for Dungans, Eurasianet, April 2021,  https://eurasianet.org/kazakhstan-trial-over-deadly-ethnic-violence-leaves-bitter-taste-for-dungans[90] ITUC CSI IGN, Kazakhstan: Statement of the ITUC Pan-European Regional Council, April 2017, https://www.ituc-csi.org/kazakhstan-statement-of-the-ituc; RFE/RL’s Kazakh Service, Hunger Strike Protests By Oil Workers Growing In Western Kazakhstan, January 2017, https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakhstan-oil-workers-hunger-strike/28241775.html[91] ITUC CSI IGN, List of affiliated organisations, November 2019, https://www.ituc-csi.org/IMG/pdf/list_of_affiliates_nov_2019.pdf[92] IndustriALL Global Union, IndustriALL calls for release of Kazakh trade union leader, July 2019, http://www.industriall-union.org/industriall-calls-for-release-of-kazakh-trade-union-leader[93] IndustriALL Global Union, Kazakh union leader Erlan Baltabay released, March 2020, http://www.industriall-union.org/kazakh-union-leader-erlan-baltabay-released[94] Human Rights Council, Advance Unedited Version, Freedom Now,  May 2021, https://www.freedom-now.org/wp-content/uploads/AUV_WGAD-Opinion_2021-5-KAZ.pdf; Freedom Now, Kazakhstan: Freedom Now Condemns Treatment of Imprisoned Labour Activist, July 2021,https://www.freedom-now.org/kazakhstan-freedom-now-condemns-treatment-of-imprisoned-labor-activist/[95] Mihra Rittman, Kazakhstan Adopts Long-Promised Amendments to Trade Union Law, Human Rights Watch, December 2020, https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/12/17/kazakhstan-adopts-long-promised-amendments-trade-union-law[96] Human Rights Watch, Kazakhstan: Independent Union Under Threat of Suspension, January 2021, https://www.hrw.org/news/2021/01/28/kazakhstan-independent-union-under-threat-suspension[97] International Labour Conference, Committee on the Application of Standards, July 2021, https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_norm/---relconf/documents/meetingdocument/wcms_804447.pdf[98] Radio Azattyk, In Almaty, Glovo couriers who went on strike tried to block the street, July 2021, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/v-almaty-obyavivshie-zabastovku-kurery-glovo-popytalis-perekryt-ulitsu/31345823.html[99] RSF, 2021 World Press Freedom Index, https://rsf.org/en/ranking#[100] Sher Khashimov and Raushan Zhandayeva, Kazakhstan’s Alternative Media Is Thriving—and in Danger, Foreign Policy, July 2021,  https://foreignpolicy.com/2021/07/12/kazakhstan-alternative-media-thriving-danger/[101] Ibid.[102] See Joanna Lillis, Dark Shadows: Inside the Secret World of Kazakhstan, IB Taurus, October 2018.[103] RSF, Regional newspaper editor harassed after investigating real estate scandal, February 2021, https://rsf.org/en/news/regional-newspaper-editor-harassed-after-investigating-real-estate-scandal[104] Order of the Minister of Culture and Information of the Republic of Kazakhstan dated June 21, 2013 No. 138, https://online.zakon.kz/m/document/?doc_id=31431046#sub_id=100CPJ, Kazakhstan adopts new accreditation requirements that journalists fear will promote censorship, March 2021, https://cpj.org/2021/03/kazakhstan-adopts-new-accreditation-requirements-that-journalists-fear-will-promote-censorship/[105] Justice for Journalists Foundation, Kazakhstan, 2020, https://jfj.fund/report-2020_2/#kz[106] IPHR, Kazakhstan: Massive restrictions on expression during COVID-19,; sudden banning of peaceful opposition, August 2020, https://www.iphronline.org/kazakhstan-massive-restrictions-on-expression-during-covid-19-sudden-banning-of-peaceful-opposition.html[107] Paolo Sorbello, Kazakhstan Decriminalizes Defamation, Keeps Hindering Free Media, June 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/07/kazakhstan-decriminalizes-defamation-keeps-hindering-free-media/; Legislationline, Penal Code of the Republic of Kazakhstan, July 2014, https://www.legislationline.org/download/id/8260/file/Kazakhstan_CC_2014_2016_en.pdf[108] Mike Eckel and Sarah Alikhan, Big Houses, Deep Pockets, RFE/RL, December 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakhstan-nazarbayev-family-wealth/31013097.html?fbclid=IwAR38vC-WSkYBgPMTm--5XVsTgP5c3oesqt7eomZmsfeUiOjahO5QThDmcGU[109] RFE/RL, After Seven Years, ‘Kazakhgate’ Scandal Ends With Minor Indictment, August 2010, https://www.rferl.org/a/After_Seven_Years_Kazakhgate_Scandal_Ends_With_Minor_Indictment_/2123800.html; Steve LeVine, Was James Giffen telling the truth?, Foreign Policy, November 2010, https://foreignpolicy.com/2010/11/19/was-james-giffen-telling-the-truth/[110] Joanna Lillis, Kazakhstan: Nazarbayev-linked billionaire sucked into UK court battle, Eurasianet, December 2020, https://eurasianet.org/international-criticism-of-duvanov-conviction-mounts-against-kazakhstan. See also Joanna Lillis, Dark Shadows: Inside the Secret World of Kazakhstan, IB Taurus, October 2018.[111] https://eurasianet.org/kazakhstan-nazarbayev-linked-billionaire-sucked-into-uk-court-battle[112] https://forbes.kz/ranking/50_bogateyshih_biznesmenov_kazahstana_-_2020[113] Robert Booth, Prince Andrew tried to broker crown property deal for Kazakh oligarch, The Guardian, July 2016, https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/jul/03/prince-andrew-broker-crown-property-kazakh-oligarch; Ian Gallagher, Kazakh-born socialite ‘Lady Goga’ who partied with her ‘very, very close friend’ Prince Andrew at her 30th birthday reveals she leads a far quieter life after turning 40, Mail Online, March 2020, https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8113173/The-quiet-life-Lady-Goga.html[114] Financial Times, The secret scheme to skim millions off central Asia’s pipeline megaproject, December 2020, https://www.ft.com/content/80f25f82-5f21-4a56-b2bb-7a48e61dd9c6; Eurasianet, Financial Times: Kazakh leader’s son-in-law skimmed millions from Chinese loads, December 2020, https://eurasianet.org/financial-times-kazakh-leaders-son-in-law-skimmed-millions-from-chinese-loans[115] See: Joanna Lillis, Dark Shadows: Inside the Secret World of Kazakhstan, IB Taurus, October 2018.[116] Joanna Lillis, Kazakhstan: Rakhatgate Saga Over as Former Son-in-Law Found Hanged, Eurasianet, February 2015, https://eurasianet.org/kazakhstan-rakhatgate-saga-over-as-former-son-in-law-found-hanged[117]BBC News, Kazakh family win Unexplained Wealth Order battle over London homes, April 2020, https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-52216011[118] George Greenwood, Emanuele Midolo, Marcus Leroux and Leigh Baldwin, Strange case of Dariga Nazarbayeva, mystery owner of Sherlock Holmes’s Baker Street address, The Times, November 2020, https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/strange-case-of-dariga-nazarbayeva-mystery-owner-of-sherlock-holmess-baker-street-address-23q7c2fpl[119] Sumaira FH, Nazarbayev’s Daughter Secured Seat In Kazakh Parliament On Ruling Party’s Ticket, Urdu Point, January 2021, https://www.urdupoint.com/en/world/nazarbayevs-daughter-secured-seat-in-kazakh-1138712.html[120] John Heathershaw, Twitter post, Twitter, July 2021, https://twitter.com/HeathershawJ/status/1414900706771865602?s=20; Susan Hawley, George Havenhand and Tom Robinson, New Briefing: Red Carpet for Dirty Money – The UK’s Golden Visa Regime, Spotlight on Corruption, July 2021,https://www.spotlightcorruption.org/new-briefing-red-carpet-for-dirty-money-the-uks-golden-visa-regime/; Dominic Kennedy, National security review of golden visas for investors, The Times, July 2021, https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/national-security-review-of-golden-visas-for-investors-mz5zsnf0c[121] Department for International Trade, Trade & Investment Factsheets, Kazakhstan, UK Gov, July 2021, https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/998607/kazakhstan-trade-and-investment-factsheet-2021-07-07.pdf[122] Ron Synovitz and Manas Kaiyrtayuly, How Top Officials, Relatives Scooped Up Kazakhstan’s Higher – Education Sector, RFE/RL, June 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakhstan-universities/31326535.html[123] Pew Research Center, Religious Composition by Country, 2010-2050, https://www.pewforum.org/2015/04/02/religious-projection-table/[124] Legislationline, The Constitution of the Republic of Kazakhstan, https://www.legislationline.org/download/id/8207/file/Kazakhstan_Constitution_1995_am_2017_en.pdf[125] Congress of Leaders of World and Traditional Religions, http://religions-congress.org/[126] United States Commission on International Religious Freedom, Annual Reports, https://www.uscirf.gov/annual-reports[127] Legislationline, The Law of the Republic of Kazakhstan of October 11, 2011, No 483-IV, On Religious Activity and Religious Associations, https://www.legislationline.org/download/id/4091/file/Kazakhstan_Law_religious_freedoms_organisations_2011_en.pdf[128] Felix Corley, Kazakhstan: 134 administrative prosecutions in 2020, Forum 18, February 2021, https://www.forum18.org/archive.php?article_id=2634[129] Zhanagul Zhursin and Farangis Najibullah, The Hijab Debate Intensifies As School Starts In Kazakhstan, RFE/RL, September 2019, https://www.rferl.org/a/the-hijab-debate-intensifies-as-school-starts-in-kazakhstan/30148088.html[130] OSCE, Kazakhstan - Parliamentary Elections, 10 January 2021, https://www.osce.org/odihr/elections/kazakhstan/470850[131] Amina Chaya, What’s wrong with the domestic violence law in Kazakhstan? Part two, Masa Media, November 2020, https://masa.media/ru/site/chto-netak-szakonom-obytovom-nasilii-vkazakhstane-chast-vtoraya[132] Evgeniya Mikhailidi, Alina Zhartieva, Nazerke Kurmangazinova, Victorious Violence, Vlast, February 2021, https://vlast.kz/obsshestvo/43869-pobedivsee-nasilie.html[133] Kazinform, Domestic and domestic violence: MPs and experts talked about the new law, October 2020, https://www.inform.kz/ru/semeyno-bytovoe-nasilie-deputaty-i-eksperty-rasskazali-o-novom-zakone_a3710389[134] Malika Autalipova and Timur Nusimbekov, The Largest Women’s March in the History of Kazakhstan, Adamar, March 2021, https://adamdar.ca/en/post/the-largest-women-s-march-in-the-history-of-kazakhstan; Asylkhan Mamashevich, National values, LGBT rights and “justification before the European Parliament”. How did the society evaluate the women’s march?, Radio Azattyq, March 2021, https://www.azattyq.org/a/kazakhstan-gender-equality-different-opinions/31142716.html[135] Human Rights Watch, Kazakhstan: Feminist Group Denied Registration, September 2019, https://www.hrw.org/news/2019/09/13/kazakhstan-feminist-group-denied-registration; Mihra Rittmann, Activists Detained in Kazakhstan ‘For Their Own Safety’, Human Rights Watch, June 2021, https://www.hrw.org/news/2021/06/01/activists-detained-kazakhstan-their-own-safety[136] The Constitution contains Article 14. 2 which promises ‘No one shall be subject to any discrimination for reasons of origin, social, property status, occupation, sex, race, nationality, language, attitude towards religion, convictions, place of residence or any other circumstances’. See The Constitution of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Legislationonline, https://www.legislationline.org/download/id/8207/file/Kazakhstan_Constitution_1995_am_2017_en.pdf;RFE/RL Kazakh Service, Sexual Minorities In Kazakhstan Hide Who They Are To Avoid Abuse, June 2021 https://www.rferl.org/a/kazakhstan-lgbt-hide-from-abuse/31316186.html[137] Draft Law ‘On protection of children from information harming their health and development’, 2015; Ministry of Information and Communication of the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Instruction ‘On Classification of Informational Products’ and ‘Methodology of Defining Informational Products for Children (Not) Harming Their Health and Development’, 2018.[138] Zhanna Shayakhmetova, Positive Dynamics Observed in Trade Between Kazakhstan and China, The Astana Times, April 2021, https://astanatimes.com/2021/04/positive-dynamics-observed-in-trade-between-kazakhstan-and-china/[139] Ayia Reno, “You need to have not only beautiful reform packages.” EU special envoy on relations with Kazakhstan, Radio Azattyq, January 2021, https://rus.azattyq.org/a/kazakhstan-eu-relations-peter-burian-special-representative-central-asia/31029755.html; European Parliament, RC-B9-0144/2021,  https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/RC-9-2021-0144_EN.html[140] OSCE, Summits, https://www.osce.org/summits [post_title] => Retreating Rights - Kazakhstan: Introduction [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => retreating-rights-kazakhstan-introduction [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-22 10:59:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-22 09:59:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://fpc.org.uk/?p=6003 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )[2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5987 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2021-07-22 11:00:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-22 10:00:15 [post_content] => As we approach the 30th anniversary of Kazakhstan’s independence this publication finds the country at an important inflection point in its history. The gradual passing of the torch from the First President (Nazarbayev) to President Tokayev, the growing articulation of social concerns in recent years as living standards have been squeezed for many, and the uncertain future that lies ahead for its economy given the global transition away from fossil fuels, all give cause for pause and reflection. Over the last 30 years Kazakhstan’s ruling elite has delivered substantial economic growth - albeit particularly benefiting itself - and has mostly maintained stability between the country’s different ethnic groups. This has come at the clear cost of almost all political freedoms and many civil liberties. The Government and its supporters still argue that gradual change will enable Kazakhstan to transition to democracy and help ‘evolve’ the political culture in Kazakhstan. The Government’s critics, understandably point to the lack of change at the heart of the country’s political system over the last 30 years, where reforms have helped deliver improvements in the standards of living and the delivery of state services but have not lead to a meaningful transfer in political power from the elite to the citizen. The only political choice in Kazakhstan, such as Tokayev assuming the Presidency, is exercised by those already in power. While President Tokayev has promised a ‘listening state’ and committed to delivering reforms that would improve freedoms and make the Government more responsive, so far change from what has gone before has been relatively limited. President Tokayev’s approach seems to be an updating of the existing path of modernisation without democratisation or reform within the system that improves state efficiency and outcomes while mostly retaining existing authoritarian power structures. While the bulk of the population has so far broadly (if sometimes grudgingly) accepted the trade-off between stability and repression, the recent protest movements have highlighted that this cannot necessarily be taken for granted going forwards. The negative outlook for Kazakhstan’s oil and gas wealth, may further exacerbate the existing inequalities within society and frustration at the kleptocratic nature of the current system.[1] So when examining how to try to achieve real change in Kazakhstan there are two main tracks that local activists are pursuing. As Colleen Wood puts in well in her essay ‘Some believe in incremental reform that is achieved through educating authorities and collaborating with government bodies. This involves close monitoring of abuses and going through proper legal channels to redress them; it involves going through the hoops required to register a political party, to try and run a campaign and to take a seat at the table.  Others prefer more expansive changes – the overhaul of Kazakhstan’s system of government from a superpresidential system to a parliamentary one, for example – to gradual reform. They opt for direct action and street protests over government working groups and committees, pointing to their constitutionally-protected right to peaceful assembly to justify skirting the required procedure for sanctioned protests. This ideological and tactical pluralism may not be ‘efficient,’ but securing the rights of all to participate in politics is central to improving Kazakhstan’s human rights record.’   What seems clear is that both approaches together are going to be needed in order to drive more fundamental change in Kazakhstan, both in terms of outcomes for citizens and in the nature of the system. Both sets of activists will need both increased local mobilisation and international support to help drive specific changes to make each path more navigable. President Tokayev’s June 2021 Decree ‘On further human rights measures in Kazakhstan’ and the upcoming human rights action plan provide a helpful framework through which to assess the Government’s willingness to change its current course in response to input from local and international partners.[2] Tokayev has committed the Government to take further steps to address:
  • ‘The mechanisms of interaction with the UN treaty bodies and special procedures of the UN Human Rights Council;
  • Ensuring the rights of victims of human trafficking;
  • Human rights of citizens with disabilities;
  • The elimination of discrimination against women;
  • The right to freedom of association;
  • The right to freedom of expression;
  • The human right to life and public order;
  • Increasing the efficiency of interaction with non-governmental organisations; and
  • Human rights in criminal justice and enforcement, and prevention of torture and ill-treatment.[3]
 These are important topics but given past performance there is an understandable degree of skepticism that this will amount to substantive change in the more controversial aspects of this agenda. This publication has highlighted a number of key ways in which the Government of Kazakhstan could prove its sceptics wrong if it so chooses. For example if the Government is genuine about wanting to build a partnership model with local civil society and to ‘increase the efficiency of its interactions’ with them it has to stop targeting NGOs with punitive tax inspections and it should reduce the deliberately burdensome reporting requirements created in 2015-16 designed to put pressure on such organisations. Their staff need to be protected from threats and harassment, with President Tokayev taking responsibility for the actions of his different ministries and agencies rather than allowing them to conflict with each other. The decision to allow independent candidates for local Akims is an important step forwards, though the pre-qualification restrictions are a cause of concern. Ultimately, however, even gradual change within the system will require improving ‘freedom of association’ by making it easier for political parties to register than the current requirements for 20,000 members and a 1,000 member initiating conference and a similar number of signatories. Aina Shormanbayeva and Amangeldy Shormanbayev suggest that a more suitable number for registration would be 200. Even more than the law on paper there needs to be a clear political signal from President Tokayev that those who participate in the founding of a political party will not be targeted for reprisals, enabling those currently unregistered or nascent political parties to become registered and stand at future elections. At present there is no indication that those in power wish to substantively alter the nature of Kazakhstan’s party system to allow genuine competition at any level of power. Therefore the direct elections taking place at a local level will struggle to deliver the gradual evolution of the political culture currently being claimed for them if all the positions are taken by those from within or affiliated with the existing power structures. The situation with currently banned political parties is somewhat more complex, given that international best practice around sources of party funding generally prohibit money coming from abroad and place criteria around its provenance. However, what is clear is that peaceful activists seeking change to the political system are being targeted and harassed by the Government simply for membership of organisations that it has deemed extremist (on the basis of the link to Mukhtar Ablyazov) without any evidence that these activists wish to overthrow the Government by violent means, which been shared with the international community. The Government should reform its use of powers under Article 405 and Article 174 of the Criminal Code to stop targeting individual protestors or those liking posts about these banned groups (the QDT/DVK and Koshe) on social media, protecting both their rights to freedom of association and expression.[4] Since the passage of reforms to the law on peaceful assembly passed in May 2020 the impact on improving freedom of assembly has been limited, though there have been some improvements such as the Women’s March being able to be held legally for the first time in 2021. Given that under the revised law both citizens and groups of citizens can give notice of a protest it seems unclear as to why there is a prohibition added to make it harder for unregistered parties and groups to exercise their right to free assembly given that they are a ‘group of adult citizens’.[5] The repeated harassment of activists from unregistered groups such as Oyan, Qazaqstan and the Democratic Party undermines President Tokayev’s promises for reform in the area of freedom of assembly and freedom of expression. While the case for deeper reform of the laws on peaceful assemblies remains urgent, even within the framework of the current law there is more that could be done to create a clear guidance with list of duties that local authorities should fulfil to proactively enable peaceful protest rather than simply providing a list of demands for protestors. Both the Government of Kazakhstan and the international community should record the number of protests that have ended up being legally sanctioned. Making further improvements in this area should be a key part of improvements under the human rights action plan to fulfil the ‘right to freedom of association’ and the ‘right to freedom of expression’. As Tatiana Chernobil writes in her essay ‘kettling’ is a police tactic designed for use in extreme circumstances where protests risk spiralling out of control into violence rather than as a routine policing procedure for peaceful protests. Its widespread use should be curtailed to ensure the application of ‘human rights in criminal justice and enforcement’. It should not be seen as a softer alternative to arrests and the use of administrative sentences against protestors, because peaceful protestors need to be able to freely exercise their rights to free assembly under both the Constitution and International Human Rights law without fear of either kettling or arrest. One of the most insidious aspects of the Government of Kazakhstan’s efforts to clamp down on independent activism has been the growing use of ‘freedom restrictions’ as part of sentences or instead of custodial sentences that prevent activists from continuing their work criticising the Government. Even when activists have been released from dubious sentences after international pressure, the restriction on their blogging, political social or union activism often remains. It is a mechanism that keeps campaigners on a tight leash, casting a chilling effect across civil society whilst limiting much of the international outcry that accompanies imprisoning political, social and labour activists. The current approach clearly breaches ‘the right to freedom of association’, ‘the right to freedom of expression’ and ‘human rights in criminal justice and enforcement’. There are numerous examples listed in the introduction and individual essays of existing restrictions that should be removed from activists including Max Bokayev, Alnur Ilyashev, Asya Tulesova, Larisa Kharkova, Amin Eleusinov and Erlan Baltabay. Similarly in the realm of ‘freedom of expression’ the human rights action plan should look at reforming Kazakhstan’s laws on the ‘Public insult and other infringement on honour and dignity’ of politicians and other public figures. These restrictions, which carry potential prison terms of up to three years in jail for ‘insults’ spread online, are widely used to restrict political criticism.[6] Galiya Azhenova’s essay shows how the reforms to transfer defamation legislation from the Criminal to the Administrative code has led to local police issuing lots of administrative violations against journalists, showing the need for better training and oversight in the short term and the need for further reform to make defamation a civil matter. The targeting of journalist by police when going about their work also needs to be addressed. Ongoing restrictions on independent trade unions, as outlined in Mihra Rittmann’s essay, need to be lifted including the current suspension the Industrial Trade Union of Fuel and Energy Workers, and independent confederations need to be able to register and operate without interference. These restrictions and those on the right to strike, including Article 402 of the Criminal Code noted by Rittmann, are in breach of the ‘right to freedom of association’ as well as the right to organise and should be replaced with measures that ensures that peaceful industrial action is recognised as being a legal right, in line with ILO conventions and the conclusions adopted repeatedly by the ILO Committee on the Application of Standards. In order to fulfil the President’s stated objectives on the ‘the elimination of discrimination against women’ it will be important to make progress on the stalled legislative efforts to create a new law on domestic violence and to improve the response of law enforcement and local authorities in addressing it. Steps should also be taken to move forward with legislative action on sexual harassment that has also stalled. The current efforts to remove the concept of gender equality from Kazakhstan’s legislation, as set out in Aigerim Kamidola’s essay, risks emboldening forces in the country’s politics that may undermine both women’s and LGBTQ+ rights and lead to an increase in hate crime. Making this change is also likely to breach its international obligations under Articles 2 of ICCPR and ICESCR and Article 1 of CEDAW. As Kamidola argues in her essay accelerating the ratification and implementation of the Council of Europe (Istanbul) Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence would be an important step that would not only assist Kazakhstan’s efforts towards the ‘the elimination of discrimination against women’, but also on ‘ensuring the rights of victims of human trafficking’. The themes addressed by Anna Gussarova’s essay around human rights in Kazakhstan’s digital space cut across a number of themes within the President’s Decree and perhaps should be addressed as a specific action area within the human rights action plan. She makes a number of important arguments about improving legislation (such as a functioning privacy law), building state capacity (such as strengthening the Information Security Committee of the Ministry of Digital Development, Innovation and Aerospace Industry to become a more powerful Data Protection Agency to act as the guardian of Kazakhstan’s digital rights) and increasing the transparency with which it operates in the digital space. She rightly warns of adopting surveillance technology and tactics from Kazakhstan’s Chinese and Russian neighbours but instead urges it strengthen collaboration with EU Member States, US and UK agencies responsible for data protection. She recommends that Kazakhstan should develop regulations on data protection and management along the lines of the EU’s GDPR system. Beyond the framework of the President’s Human Rights Decree there is a lot more work to be done to fulfil his pledge to make Kazakhstan a ‘listening state’. There is scope for the reforms to local government by the direct election of local Akims, that are starting this month at a village level and then expanding up to higher tiers of local Government in future years, to significantly improve governance standards and local accountability. However, this will only happen if there is genuine electoral competition with true independents allowed to stand and (following on from any changes to registration suggested above) new parties able to compete. Without this, more open political environment the shift to direct election would simply replace a system where local officials are accountable to the central state rather than local people through the means of appointment and replace it with officials owing their position to higher-ups with Nur-Otan or other pro-Government parties. At a national level, as already noted, there is a long-way to go until political pluralism is realistic prospect but there should still be scope within the current system to further strengthen the role of the Mazhils and official oversight bodies such as the Office of the Human Rights Ombudsman to make more limited improvements. The essay by Aina Shormanbayeva and Amangeldy Shormanbayev of the International Legal Initiative Foundation sets out a more expansive vision of possible structural reform through creating smaller local regions and transferring significant powers from the President to Parliament. They believe these proposals should be incorporated in a widespread reform of the constitution. When examining potential tools available to those in the international community wishing to exert influence to improve Kazakhstan’s performance on human rights there needs to be a recognition of both the opportunities and limitations at present. Kazakhstan’s position as an upper middle income country, therefore not a significant recipient of international aid (ODA), and with a well-developed multi-vector foreign and economic policy gives its leaders significant room for manoeuvre.[7] It has already had a new Enhanced Partnership and Cooperation Agreement enter into force with its largest trading partner-the EU- ahead of its regional neighbours.[8] This is not however to imply that Kazakhstan in impervious to international influence or pressure on human rights. Its leadership, and particularly a number of younger generation officials and leaders, care about Kazakhstan’s reputation, something it has worked hard to promote itself internationally as a good partner and modern country. There is an ongoing desire from Kazakhstan to continue to receive foreign investment and support, particularly as the world transitions away from fossil fuels. It also remains extremely keen to balance out its relations with Russia and China, given concerns about encroachment and influence both historic and current. However, it is far from clear that these considerations could yet outweigh the desire to maintain the political and economic status quo, particularly amongst the upper echelons of the state and the security apparatus. Nevertheless, as shown throughout this publication, interventions by Western Governments and pressure from international human rights groups in support of local campaigns can make a difference in particular cases of egregious human rights abuse and to free political prisoners. The EU has a structured human rights dialogue with Kazakhstan which has long argued gives it some ability to influence behaviour in a setting behind closed doors, though some activists remain skeptical about the use of the mechanism. It is to be hoped that the UK can seek to replicate a structured human rights dialogue as part of the new bilateral deal it is negotiating to replace the EU EPCA.[9] Kazakhstan remains keen to receive international technical assistance to help it modernise the state and its delivery of public services to achieve reform within the current system, with a more limited impact on the core nature of political power. Kazakhstan also currently receives significant lending from International Financial Institutions with the World Bank’s $4.15 billion for 13 projects and Regional Development Banks such as the EBRD whose current portfolio totals €2.43bn.[10] Again this mixture of finance and technical expertise can help improve specific outcomes and provide a small degree of leverage if the international community chose to use it in that way but these figures need to be set in the context of the $62 billion reserves in Kazakhstan’s National Oil Fund.[11] As set out in the previous ‘Retreating Rights’ publications on Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, the gradual progress of global anti-corruption measures (such as the UK’s Unexplained Wealth Orders) and both corruption and human rights focused ‘Magnitsky’ sanctions provides opportunities for Western countries to hold the elites to authoritarian and kleptocratic states to account. At present Magnitsky sanctions have not been deployed by the US, EU or UK in relation to Kazakhstan. For both practical and diplomatic reasons the UK National Crime Agency may be reticent, in the wake of the failure of its case against Dariga Nazarbayeva, to take on new Unexplained Wealth Order cases that relate to Kazakhstan, but it is important to ensure it is given the support to move forward with future cases where it believes the evidence warrants further action. A further measure the UK and other countries are currently debating is reform of so-called ‘golden visas’ for investors. At present there are at least 205 Kazakhstani holders of these investor visas but less than one million pounds of FDI was coming in to the UK from Kazakhstan in the last recorded year (2019) which suggests that the UK is being used predominantly to store personal wealth in the luxury property market rather than as a wider opportunity for economically productive investment.[12] The UK delivering on its long-overdue commitments to produce a beneficial ownership register for property and reforms to the reporting requirements of its overseas territory tax havens would also help increase transparency about the extent of the wealth accrued by Kazakhstan’s ruling elite. So this publication finds that Kazakhstan is passing through a period of transition with its present and future looking somewhat more unsettled than its recent past. The extent of Kazakhstan’s human rights challenges are substantial, particularly as they relate to anything that could upset the existing political and economic order that the countries’ ruling elite benefit from so substantially. President Tokayev’s stated commitments to create a ‘listening state’, his recent human rights decree and wider promises of reform give benchmarks against which performance can be measured. It will be hugely important to support local civil society in holding him to these commitments, supported by a mix of international pressure (both for systemic change and on specific abuses) and continued technical support, the latter which may still improve outcomes for Kazakhstani citizens even within the current system of modernisation without democratisation. Reforms to transparency and anti-corruption measures in Western jurisdictions can hopefully assist in holding those who have abused the current system to a measure of account. Recommendations Based on the findings of the research in this publication the Government of Kazakhstan should:
  • Stop targeting NGOs with punitive tax inspections and burdensome reporting requirements;
  • Make it easier for parties to register and protect political activists from state harassment;
  • Consider opportunities for constitutional reform that would enhance the powers of Parliament and strengthen checks on executive power;
  • End the use of anti-extremism legislation powers under Article 405 and Article 174 of the Criminal Code to target protestors or those liking or sharing opposition posts on social media;
  • Further reform the law on public assembly to end restrictions on unregistered groups and improve guidance to local authorities;
  • Stop using kettling as a policing tactic for peaceful demonstrations;
  • End the use of ‘freedom restrictions’ in sentencing that prevent activists and bloggers from continuing their work. Remove the current restrictions from activists including Max Bokayev, Alnur Ilyashev, Asya Tulesova, Larisa Kharkova, Amin Eleusinov, and Erlan Baltabay;
  • Stop the continued harassment of independent trade unions and striking workers;
  • Remove laws on insulting the honour and dignity of public officials used to silence criticism;
  • End police harassment of independent journalists and improve how officials treat them
  • Improve data protection and privacy regulation and enforcement;
  • Deliver on commitments to produce new laws on domestic violence and sexual harassment, while retaining protections on the right to gender equality; and
  • Ensure that direct elections for local officials provide opportunities for accountability and pluralism. Consider further local government reforms to increase its connection to citizens.
 To the international community:
  • Raise systemic problems and individual cases of abuse both in private and in public; and
  • Examine the use of international mechanisms for tacking corruption and kleptocracy, including improved transparency requirements, reform of ‘golden visas’, Magnitsky sanctions and anti-corruption tools such as Unexplained Wealth Orders where appropriate.
 [1] Casey Michel, Nazarbayev and the Rise of the Kleptocrats, October 2016,  https://thediplomat.com/2016/10/nazarbayev-and-the-rise-of-the-kleptocrats/[2] President of Kazakhstan, President Tokayev Signs a Decree on Further Measures of the Republic of Kazakhstan in the Field of Human Rights, June 2021, https://www.gov.kz/memleket/entities/mfa-delhi/press/news/details/215657?lang=kk[3] Ibid.[4] Legislationline, Criminal Code of the Republic of Kazakhstan (2014, amended 2016) (English version), https://www.legislationline.org/documents/section/criminal-codes/country/21/Kazakhstan/show[5] Legislationline, On the procedure for organising and holding peaceful assemblies in the Republic of Kazakhstan, May 2020, https://www.legislationline.org/download/id/8924/file/Kazakhstan%20-%20Peaceful%20assemblies%20EN.pdf[6] Legislationline, Criminal Code of the Republic of Kazakhstan (2014, amended 2016) (English version), https://www.legislationline.org/documents/section/criminal-codes/country/21/Kazakhstan/show[7] For example Kazakhstan no longer receives bilateral allocations from the EU’s Development and Cooperation Instrument (DCI) but does have access to some funding from regional programmes. See EU DG International Partnerships, https://ec.europa.eu/international-partnerships/where-we-work/kazakhstan_en[8] EU Commission, DG Trade, https://ec.europa.eu/trade/policy/countries-and-regions/countries/kazakhstan/index_en.htm[9] It should be noted that the UK-Uzbekistan PCA contains human rights as a subset of the wider political dialogue but whatever the format there needs to be a specific process for addressing human rights challenges within the relationship.[10] EBRD, Kazakhstan data, https://www.ebrd.com/kazakhstan-data.html[11] Sam Bhutia, Tracking Kazakhstan’s sovereign wealth funds through the last oil slump, Eurasianet, January 2020, https://eurasianet.org/tracking-kazakhstans-sovereign-wealth-funds-through-the-last-oil-slump[12] Department for International Trade, Kazakhstan Investment Factsheet, July 2021,  https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/998607/kazakhstan-trade-and-investment-factsheet-2021-07-07.pdf [post_title] => Retreating Rights - Kazakhstan: Conclusions and Recommendations [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => retreating-rights-kazakhstan-conclusions-and-recommendations [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-22 10:41:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-22 09:41:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://fpc.org.uk/?p=5987 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )[3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5930 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2021-06-30 00:14:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-06-29 23:14:44 [post_content] => Акыркы 15 жылда Кыргызстан учурдагы президентин үчүнчү жолу кетирип, тез жана ыраатсыз өзгөрүулөрдү башынан кечирип жаткан кези. Жыйында бул көйгөйдүн тамырлары канчалык терең кеткени чагылдырылат. Бул басылышта Кыргызстандагы укук институттарынын башкы кемчиликтери катары паракорчулук менен жазасыздык изилденип, Борбордук Азиядагы башка өлкөлөрдүн маселелерине салыштырмалуу Кыргызстандагы көйгөйлөргө көңүл бурулбай же кичирейтилип ачык айтылбагандыгы көрүнүүдө. Бирок, Ковид-19 пандемиясы бул маселелерди даана ачык айкын көрсөттү. Бул чыгарылыш 2020-жылдын октябрь айындагы орун алган окуялардын жыйынтыгында бошонуп чыккан жаңы президент Садыр Жапаровдун пайда болгонун жана анын Кыргызстандын келечегине тийгизер таасирин түшүндүрүүгө аракет кылат.  Инстинктивдүү антиэлитардык популист, таасирдүү жеке өмүр баянга ээ болгон жана өткөн мезгилде экономикалык улутчулдукка шектелген Жапаров бийликти тез арада өз колуна алуу иш аракетин жасап, ал кадамы көп талаш-тартышты туудурган Конституциялык реформанын жүргүзүлүшүндө байкалат. Либералдуу ой-жүгүрткөн жарандык коом акыркы он жылда оор абалга дуушар болду. Ага мисал катары улутчулдуктуктун өсүшүн жана тез алмашкан бийлик жетекчилери жарандык коомго болушунча таасирин тийгизип аларга болгон басымдын көбөйүшүн айта алабыз. Мунун айынан жана өкмөттүн куралына айланган ЛГБТ коомунун жана аялдардын укутарынын коргогону учун коом тарабынан жарандык активисттерге болгон жек көрүү сезими пайда болду. Азыркы кырдаалды баалоо максатында төмөнкү басылыш Кыргызстандагы донордук демилгелердин үстүнөн тармактык жана түп тамырынан ойлоп чыгууну сунуштап, жардам берүүнүн жаңы жолдорун ойлоп табууга өбөлгө түзүүдө. Мындай жолдорго жергиликтүү маселелерге ийкемдүүрөөк мамиле кылуу керектигин, жаңы идеялар менен уюмдарды колдоо мүмкүнчүлүктөрүн,  башкарууга, ачык-айкындыкка жана отчеттуулукка  жаңыланган көз-карашты  камтысак болот. Паракорчулукка белчеден көмүлгөн “элитанын” өкүлдөрү тапкан байлыктарын чет жака жашыруу аракеттерине, ошондой эле Кыргызстанда акыйкатты орнотуу кыйын болгон учурларда, мисалы Азимжан Аскаровдун кайгылуу окуяга жооп катары Магнитский санкциялары жана глобалдык коррупцияга каршы чаралар көрүлүшү мүмкүн. Адам укуктарынын сакталышынын башкы көрсөткүчтөрүн канааттандыруу үчүн потенциалдуу соода-сатыктын, жардамдын жана инвестицияны тартып келуу шарттарын жакшыртууга мүмкүнчүлүктөр бар. Бул эмгек Кыргызстандын Конституциясынын жаңы мыйзам долбооруна киргизиле турган өзгөртүүлөрдүн багытын сунуштап, социалдык тармактарда ишин алып барган компанияларды, куугунтукка кабылган активисттер менен журналисттерди коргоо максатында активдуу иш-аракеттерге чакырмакчы. Эл-аралык коомчулук Кыргызстанда болгон маселелердин масштабы туралуу иллюзиялык ойдо болбоого тийиш. Ал укук жана эркиндик жолунан артка кайтуу процессин ыкчам түрдө алдын алып, Кыргызстандагы системалык көйгөйлөрдү чечүү үчүн көмөк көрсөтүүнүн жаңы жолдорун табуу зарыл. Кыргызстандын өкмөтүнө, эл-аралык институттарга жана батыш донорлорго берилүүчү кеңештер:
  • Жазасыздык, жек көрүү жана коррупция маселелерине олуттуу көңүл буруу;
  • Кыргызстанда эл-аралык донорлордун тарабынан каржыланып жаткан долбоорлор системалык түрдө текшерилип турушу керек. Мындай долбоорлорго бюджеттик колдоо, консультация кызматтарын колдонуу жана бейөкмөт уюмдар менен иш алпаруулар кирет. Алардын текшерилиши фактылар менен ар тараптуу катышуунун негизинде жүргүзүлүп, долбоорлордун максаттарына жана алардын ишке ашырылгандыгына көңүл бурулуусу зарыл.
  • Өнөктөштөрдү жергиликтүү баалуулуктар менен тааныштырып, аларга көнүп кетүү үчүн мейкиндик жана керектүү каражаттары менен камсыздап, жаңычыл ой жүгүртүүгө жана жаңы добуштарга болгон мүмкүнчүлүктөрүнүн кеңейтүү жолдорун табуу;
  • Жапаровдун өкмөтүнө Адам Укуктар боюнча жаңы Улуттук Иштер Планын иштеп чыгууга талап коюу;
  • Европа биримдиги менен Улуу Британиянын ортосундагы туюкка кептелип калган өнөктөштүк макулдаштыктарды жөнгө салуу максатында башкаруу жана адам укуктары жаатындагы шарттарды жогорулатуу; карыз жүгүн жеңилдетүү; мамлекеттик жардамды жакшыртуу менен жаңы инвестицияларды тартып келүү;
  • Кыргызстанда Магнитский санкцияларын жана башка коррупцияга каршы механизмдерин кененирээк колдонуу;
  • Социалдык тармактарда кыргыз тилин жайылтуу жана чыгымдарды төлөө механизмдерин бекемдөө;
  • Жаңы Конституциянын мыйзам долбооруна бейөкмөт уюмдарды, профсоюздарды, сөз эркиндигин жана азчылыктардын укуктарын коргоого багытталган өзгөртүүлөрдүн киргизилишине басым жасоо; Башкы прокурордун ыйгарым укуктарын кеңейтилишинен баш тартуу;
  • Жарандык консультациялар үчүн жаңы механизмдерди изилдеп чыгуу,   Кыргызстандагы жергиликтүү практикасынан жана башка өнүгүп жаткан өлкөлөрдөгү консультативдик мекемелеринен үйрөнүү, жана жарандык чогулуштарды колдонуу.
[post_title] => Retreating Rights - Кыскача мазмун [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => retreating-rights-%d0%ba%d1%8b%d1%81%d0%ba%d0%b0%d1%87%d0%b0-%d0%bc%d0%b0%d0%b7%d0%bc%d1%83%d0%bd [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-09 12:39:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-09 11:39:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://fpc.org.uk/?p=5930 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )[4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5845 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2021-06-30 00:13:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-06-29 23:13:30 [post_content] => Бул “Күчү жоголуп бараткан укуктар” аттуу басылманы Кыргызстандагы тез жана башаламан болуп жаткан өзгөрүүлөрдүн убагын жыйынтыктоо аракети десе болот. Кыргызстан учурдагы абалга кандайча келип калганы, ага жараша келечекте жасалчу иш аракеттер тууралуу сөз болмокчу.[1]  Учурда мамлекеттин болгон акыбалынын түпкү себептери көп жылдар мурун пайда болуп, жадагалса Кыргызстанда ошол убакыттын ичинде пайда болгон көптөгөн инститтуттар андан кийин түптөлгөн. Ушул сыяктуу структуралык маселелердин деталдуу анализи киришүүнүн экинчи бөлүгүндө жана бул жыйынга кирген макалаларда камтылган. Бул долбоорду биринчи жолу 2019-жылдын күз айында кабыл алган маалда, бир канча убакыттан бери бүтүндөй өлкөнү улутчулдук менен коррупция кара булуттай каптап калган эле (буга чейин деле алар ар башка тармактарда болуп келген). Бирок, COVID-19 пандемиясына көрүлгөн начар даярдык менен саткынчы өкмөткө болгон элдин нааразычылыгы акыркы 15 жылдын ичинде үчүнчү төңкөрүшкө алып келди. Борбордук Азиянын башка коңшу мамлекеттерине салыштырмалуу, Кыргызстандагы демократия башкаруу жана адам укуктары жаатында болгон терең жана тамырлап кетип бараткан кээ бир көйгөйлөрдү жаап жашырат. Бийликтин ичиндеги кайнап жаткан атаандаштык жана паракорчулук боюнча болгон коркунучтар мурунку эки башаламандыкка алып келген: 2017-жылдагы чуулгандуу шайлоо жана 2019-жылдын август айындагы орун алган Кой-Таш окуясынан кийинки мурдагы президент Алмазбек Атамбаевдин камакка алынышы тууралуу кеп болмокчу. Кыргызстандын түштүгүндө жашаган өзбек элинин этникалык азчылыгына карата өлкөдөгү зомбулук коомчулук арасында маселени жаратууда. Бул этникалык азчылыгына карата дискриминация уланып жатканы анык, анткени алардын тил жана жеке менчик мүлк укуктары тебеленип, канааттандыраарлык дэңгээлде каралган эмес. Саясий куугунтукка кабылган Азимжан Аскаровдун 2020-жылдагы азаптуу өлүмү ошол кайгылуу көрүнүштүн үзүрү болуп, коомчулук арасындагы чыңалууну көрсөтүп турат. Акыркы он жылдын ичинде, өзгөчө акыркы 2-3 жылда жарандык коомдун активисттери бюрократиялык басымдын, атайын кызматтардын аңдуусу жана улутчулдук мамиленин айынан дуушар болгон көйгөлөрдүн саны артып жатканы боюнча чуу көтөргөнү аракет жасашкан. Тилекке каршы, кедейлик менен өнүгүүнүн башка көрсөткүчтөрүнүн дэңгээли төмөн болуп турганына карабастан, бул маселелер көп учурларда кичирейтилип көрсөтулгөн, себеби жарандык эркиндик менен адам укукатар жаатында Кыргызстанды Боробордук Азия аймагында ийгиликке жетишкен мамлекет катары көрсөтүү кызыкчылыгы орун алган. 2020-жылдын июнь айында эле Европа Биримдиги сыяктуу эл аралык өнөктөштөр “адам укуктары жаатындагы жалпы кырдаалды туруктуу деп белгилеп, региондогу алдыңкы позицияда экенин айтышты. Өкмөт өзүнүн күн тартибинде адам укуктары боюнча маселелерин белгилеп, бул багытта керектүү болгон документтерди кабыл алган, мисал катары 2019-2021 жылдардын Адам укуктар жаатындагы иш-чаралардын Улуттук Планы”.[2] Көбөйүп бараткан көйгөйлөр көптөн бери көңүлгө алынбагандыктан, орчундуу жана терең өзгөрүүлөрдү токтотуу өтө кеч болуп калган. Кыргызстандагы саясий тынчтыктын казаны бир нече жылдын ичинде акырындап кайнап отуруп, акырында 2020-жылдын аягында элдин чыдамы түгөнүп, көтөрүлүш менен аяктады. Натыйжада, бул окуя Кыргызстандагы саясий тынчтыкты камсыздай турган олуттуу көйгөйлөр жана чечүүгө кеч болуп калган маселелерди ортого чыгарды. Бул басылма жогоруда белгиленген суроолорго жообун табууга аракет кылганын кошумчалай кетебиз. Биз учурдагы кырдаалга кантип келдик: Кыргызстандын кыскача тарыхы Бүгүнкү күндө Кыргызстанга таандык болгон жерлери мурун бир катар өрөөндүн жашоочуларына жана Энесай Кыргыз Каганаты (учурдагы кыргыз элинин ата-бабалары тарабынан негизделген деген божомолдор жок эмес) үчүн дагы мекен болуп келген. Бирок мындай көрүнүш бул жерлерди башка өрөөндүн элдери тартып алган убакытка чейин гана болгон, тартып алгандарды айтканда биринчи кезекте XIII-кылымдагы Монгол империясы эскерилмекчи.[3] Кыргыз каганатынын түптөлүү заманын (IX кылым) улуттук тарыхы  Кыргызстанда улуттук иденттүүлүк катары кеңири колдонулуп келген, дүйнөдө эң узун поэма катары таанылган “Манас” эпосундагы сүрөттөлгөн окуялары менен негизделет.[4] Ал заманда кыргыз эли учурдагы Кыргызстандын жери менен чектеш аймактарда көбүнчө көчмөн жашоо таризинде жашап, Кытай эли менен Кыргызстандын түштүгүндө жайгашкан Тимурид сыяктуу отурукташып калган империялар менен иш жүргүзүшчү. Кыргыз элинин Орусия менен, тагырак айтканда Улуу Екатерина менен биринчи жолугушуусу 1775-жылы болуп өткөн. Мындан туура 100 жылдан кийин (1876) кыргыз уруулары Орус империясынын курамына толугу менен кирген. Ал эми 1924-жылы Орусиянын Советтик Социалисттик Республикаларынын курамында Советтер Кара-Кыргыз автономиялык облусун негиздешкен. Кийин, 1936-жылы ал Советтер Союзунун курамына толугу менен кирип, Кыргыз Советтик Социалисттик Республикасына айланган. Советтер Союзунун кыйрашына жакын Коммунисттик партиядагы алда канча беделдүү ишмерлердин арасындагы мамилелер туюкка кептелгенине байланыштуу, Кыргыз Илимдер Академиясынын Президенти Аскар Акаев өлкөнүн Президент кызматына келген. Экономикалык жана саясий либерализация жолунда Борбордук Азиядагы кесиптештерине салыштырмалуу ишин ийгиликтүү жүргүзгөн Аскар Акаев жаңы түптөлгөн Кыргыз Республикасын 2005-жылга чейин башкарат. Борбордук Азиянын советтик дооордон кийинки башкармалыктагы кесиптештерине салыштырмалуу Акаевдин авторитардык амбициялары төмөнурөөк болгонуна карабастан, ал башкарып турган учурда коррупциянын дэңгээли тайбай өсүп жатты. 2005 – 2020-жылдардагы кырдаалМандат боюнча башкаруунун үчүнчү мөөнөтү 2005-жылы бүтөөрүнө байланыштуу кызматын бошотоору тууралуу сөз бергенине карабастан, Акаев башкарыла турган бийликти өз балдарынын бирине берээри же жаңыдан жогорку кызматка ат салышууга тоскоол болгон мөөнөт чектөөлөрдү бузаары жөнүндө ушак-кептер таркап кеткен. Акаевдин башкаруусуна болгон нааразылык өлкө боюнча күчөп, 2005-жылдын февраль айында өтө турчу парламенттик шайлоодо фальсификация коркунучу артып, чыңалуунун туу чокусу Акаевдин мамлекеттен качып кетүүсү (кийин Москвада академиялык карьерасын улантып кеткен) болду. Тарыхта бул окуя “Жоогазын революциясы” деп аталып калган.[5] Нааразылык кыймылынын башчысы, мурдагы премьер-министр Курманбек Бакиев бир эле убакта убактылуу премьер-министр жана президенттин милдетин аткаруучу кызматтарын ээлеп калып, Акаевди алып тушкөндөн кийинки 2005-жылкы шайлоодо ал жеңип чыккан. Бул жыйындагы бир нече авторлор белгилегендей, Бакиев мурунку ажодой эле, реформаларды убадалаганы менен, кийин өзү коррупцияга белчесинен батып кеткен. Энергетикалык каатчылыктын пайда болушу менен (электрокубаттуулугунун веердик өчүрүлүшү менен өсүп жаткан чыгымдар) Бакиевтин коррупциялык аракеттерине каршылык көрсөткөндөр нааразылык акциялары менен башаламандык иштерин жүзөгө ашырууга бышып жетилип, өкмөттүн маанилүү имараттар менен Ак үй басып алынды. 2010-жылдын апрелинде Бакиевтин кетишине чеийн орун алган олуттуу окуялар 65 адамдын өлүмү менен аяктады. Бирок, буга карабастан Бакиевдин тарапташтары өлкөнүн түштүгүндө мобилизация иштерин улантып, натыйжасында башаламандыктар башталып, чыңалуунун жогорку чекити Оштогу 2010-жылдын июнь айындагы каргашалуу окуялары менен коштолгон. Негизинен бул окуяда этникалык өзбектер Бакиевге каршы чыккандарды колдогону айтылып келет, а бирок жаңжалдын түпкү себеби тууралуу маалымат кийинки бөлүктө сөз болмокчу. Бакиев өз тууган-уруктары жана тегеректеги жакындары менен биргеликте Белорусияда башкалка издеп, тапканы белгилүү. Ошондой эле мурунку премьер-министр Данияр Усеновдун өз аты-жөнүн өзгөртүп, учурда Белоруссия улуттук биотехнологиялык корпорациянын жетекчиси болуп алганы көз жаздымда кала албайт. Ал эми Курманбек Бакиевдин уулу, Максим Бакиев башкалканы Улуу Британиядан тапкан.[6] 2005-жылы Бакиев менен бир даражада болгон Роза Отунбаева 2010-жылдын июль айында Референдумда Конституция кабыл алынгандан кийин кыска-мөөнөттүк президенттик кызматка аттанган. Жаңы кабыл алынган Конституцияга ылайык мурун Президентке таандык болгон ыйгарым укуктары толугу менен Парламентке (Жогорку Кеңешке же Жогорку Сотко) өткөрүлгөн. 2011-жылдын декабрь айында президенттик кызматты аткарган Роза Отунбаеванын ордуна премьер-министр Алмазбек Атамбаев келген. Кайра эле, бул жыйындын бир катар авторлору белгилегендей, реформалар жасалат деген убадалар менен келип, коррупционер жана башкарууга эпсиз деген аттарга конуп кеткен. Кандай болсо да, постсоветтик Кыргызстандын тарыхында өз кызматында толук мөөнөтүн иштеп кеткен жалгыз президент болуп келет. Атамбаев элди дурбөтпөстөн кызматын өз каалосу менен тарапташына тынч өткөрүп бере алды. 2017-жылы Атамбаев Кыргызстан Социал-демократ партиясындагы кесиптеши жана ал учурдагы премьер-министр Сооронбай Жээнбековго бийликти тапшырган. Бул шайлоо жалпысынан эркин өттү дегенибиз менен, шайлоо учурунда административдик ресурстар колдонулуп көптөгөн добуштар сатылып кеткен.[7] Бирок Сооронбай Жээнбеков кызматына киришип баштаары менен эле мурунку президент менен ортосунда тез эле келише албастык пайда болуп, Атамбаев жана анын кишилерине каршы бир топ сот иштери козголгон. Бул иш Кой-Таштагы үйүндө Атамбаевдин тарапташтары менен спецназдардын куралдуу тирешүүсүнө алып келип, азыркы убакка чейин каралып жаткан коррупция менен адамды кокустуктан өлтүрүү деген күнөөлөрү боюнча 11 жылга кесилиши менен аяктаган. Кыргызстан Социал- демократтар партиясы Атамбаевдин жана Жээнбековдун тарапташтары деп эки фракцияга бөлүнүп, акырында 2020-жылдагы келе жаткан шайлоого “бийлик партиясы” катары иш жүргүзүү максатында Жээнбековдун жактоочулары “Биримдик” партиясына биригишкен. Кыргызстан “Демократиянын аралчасы” деген репутациясы коңшу мамлекеттердеги демократиянын дэңгээлин салыштыруу максатында колдонулуп, бул фактка Кыргызстандын постсоветтик жылдардын ичинде бир нече жолу басым жасалган. Бирок, ошол жылдардын ичинде Кыргызстандагы демократиянын “саясий ден-соолугу” тууралуу көптөгөн олуттуу кооптор жашап келген,[8] себеби ар бир шайланган президент эл нааразылыгынан улам кызматынан кеткен же аткарган милдеттеринин мөөнөтү аягына чыкканда түрмөгө отуруп калган.[9] Калктын жан башына 1 309$ түшкөн ички дүң продукциясынын көрсөткүчү менен постсоветтик аймагында Кыргызстан эң кедей өлкөлөрдүн тизмесинде жана массалык миграция боюнча экинчи сапта турат. Кыргыз мигранттарынын көбүнчөсү Орусияга кетип, ал жактан Кыргызстанга которулган акчанын саны Кыргызстандын ички дүң продукциясынын 28,5% түзөт.[10] Transparency International (“Трэнспэрэнси интернэшнал” – “эл-аралык ачык-айкын”) Коррупцияны кабылдоо Индекси уюмунун маалыматына караганда, дүйнө жүзү боюнча коррупциясы төмөнкү дэңгээлде болгон өлкөлөрдүн тизмесинде Кыргызстан 124-орунду ээлеген. Ал эми Кыргызстан көптөн бери чыныгы демократиялык өлкө катары эсептелгенине карабастан, Freedom House (“Фридом хаус” – “Эркиндиктин үйү”) бей-өкмөт уюмунун Nations in Transit долбоорунун алкагында жарыяланган отчетуна ылайык 100 баллдык системасында саясий эркиндик критерийи боюнча 11 балл жана жарандык эркиндиги боюнча 27 балл менен Кыргызстандагы саясий абал консолидацияланган авторитардык режимге айланып калганы бир нече жолу белгиленген.[11] 2016-жылы батыш донорлордун жана кыргыз жарандык коомдун тарабынан жасалган күчтүү басымдын натыйжасында Кыргызстан орустардын чет өлкөлүк агенттерге байланышкан мыйзам долбоорун кабыл алуудан аз жерде калган. Ошондой эле, көптөгөн бей-өкмөт уюмдар таасири чоң көзүрлөр менен байланышкан бейөкмөт субъекттердин жана бийлик тарабынан үзгүлтүксүз жасалган басым тууралуу кабар беришкен.[12] Акыркы он жылдын ичинде эл арасында көбөйүп бараткан улутчулдук Кыргызстандагы коомдук жашоонун негизги мобилизациялык күчүнө айланганы тууралуу маалымат бул эмгектин киришүү бөлүмүндө жана алдыдагы эсселерде сөз болмокчу.[13] Бул жагымсыз көрүнүш төмөнкүлөрдө байкалууда, алар: батыш менен Кытайга карата улутчул маанайдын пайда болушу; жергиликтүү орус тилдүүлөргө болгон кастыктын өсүшү (бирок Орусияга тиешелүү эмес); аялдардын, этникалык жана сексуалдык азчылыктардын укук маселеринин чыңалуусу. 2018-жылдын аягынан баштап (чыныгы менен жалганга экөөнө тең тиешелүү) кытайлык мигранттар, өлкөгө Кытайдан тартылып келген инвестициялар менен Кытайдагы этникалык кыргыздарга жасалган мамилеси боюнча бир катар нааразылык акциялары жүргүзүлгөн.[14] 2019-жылдын август айында тоо кендерин казып чыгуучу “Чжун Цзи” аттуу компаниясы айлана чөйрөгө келтирилген зыян менен жумушчуларга жасалган терс мамиле боюнча айыпталып, бул компанияга таандык болгон “Солтон-Сары” шахтасында жаңжал ортого чыга түшкөн.[15] Бул жаңжал этникалык жана геостратегиялык жактан маанилүү болгондуктан, мындай нааразачылыктар экономиканын алдыга жылбаганы тууралуу коркунучтарын кеңири таратып, Кыргызстандын кең байлыктарынын пайдасы жергиликтүү элге тийбестен, эл аралык инвесторлордун (жана ички элиталардын) чөнтөгүнө түшүп жатат деген ойду пайда кылды. Кыргызстандын ички дүң продукциясынын 9% түзүп, тоо кендерин казып чыгуучу канадалык “Центерра” фирмасына таандык болгон “Күмтөр” алтын кен булагынын акцияларынын чечүүчү бөлүгү чет-өлкөлүк фирмасынын ээ болушуна болгон каршылык менен нааразычылыктар кыргыз саясий аренасындагы дебаттардын туруктуу темасы болуп келген. Дал ошол эле тема учурдагы президент Садыр Жапаровдун баштапкы популярдуулугунун булагы болуп, 2013-жылы өзү жетектеген мамлекеттештирүүгө каршы протесттердин убагында орун алган адам уурдоо кылмышы боюнча соттоолуусуна негиз болуп берген.[16] 2020-жылдын башында кытайдын экономикалык кийлигүүшүүсүнө шек саналып ага каршы көпкө узаган протесттер пайда болду. Анын натыйжасында, кытайдын чек арасына жакын Нарын облусунун экономикалык эркин аймакка кирген жана 275 миллион долларды түзгөн кыргыз-кытай логистикалык борбордун курулуш долбоору токтолду.[17] Аял укуктарын коргоочулар (либералдык жарандык коомдогу тарапташтары менен бирге) жана демонстранттарга каршылык көрсөткөн улутчулдардын арасындагы аял укуктар маселеси өзгөчө уруш-талашты жараткан орчундуу көйгөйгө айланып калган. 2019-жылдын аягында Бишкектеги Кыргыз улуттук көркөм сүрөт жана искуство музейинде феминисттик искусствосун чагылдырган, кыргыз жана эл аралык сүрөтчүлөрдүн тарабынан уюштурулган “Заманбап искусствосунун феминналеси” аттуу көргөзмөсү коомчулукту дүрбөтүп, нааразычылыкты козгогон.[18] Көргөзмөгө каршылыгын билдирип (бул көргөзмөдө казак сүрөтчүсү Зоя Фалькованын Evermust аттуу иши камтылган. Ал боксердук грушасын үйдөгү болгон зордук- зомбулукту баса белгилөө максатында аялдын тулку бой формасында жасап, көргөзмөгө койгон), нааразычылыгын көрсөтүп жаткан улутчул топтордун кайтарган жообу Маданият министрлиги тарабынан көргөзмөдөгү кээ бир иштерге цензура салынганында билинип, өлтүрүү коркунучтарынын таасиринен улам музейдин куратору ишинен кетүүгө аргасыз болгон.[19] 8-март күнү белгиленген Эл аралык аялдар күнү жаңжалдын жогоруда белгиленген эки тараптын ортосундагы болгон талаш-тартышы заманбап Кыргызстанда көптөн бери уланып келе жаткан маселени 2020-жылы кайрадан козгоду. ЭрикМакГлинчи өз эссесинде белгилегендей, “2020-жылдын Эл аралык аялдардын 8-март күнү бетине маска тагып, башына  кыргыздын улуттук баш кийимин ак калпакты кийген эркектердин тобу Бишкектин Эски аянтында чогулган зордук-зомбулук, кыздарды ала-качуу менен  турукташып калган жана кенири тараган үй-бүлөдөгү зомбулукка каршы чыккан, активисттердин тобуна кол салган.[20] Эң кызыктуусу, кол көтөргөндөрдүн тобу камакка алынбай, алардын ордуна аялдардын укугун коргогон 50 активист-кыздар кармалган.”’[21]  2020 жылдын мартктябрь айларыАялдардын Эл аралык күнүндө болгон ызы-чуудан кийин, Кыргызстанда COVID-19 оорусунун биринчи учурлары катталып, кадимки саясий жашоо дароо эле токтогон. 22-мартта Бишкекте коомдук транспорттордун жүрүшү токтоп, кийин бул кырдаал олуттуу карантин менен коменданттык сааттын киргизилиши менен аяктайт.[22] Автордун өзүнүн өлкөсүн дагы эске алуу менен дүйнө жүзү боюнча башка мамлекеттердей эле Кыргызстанга кирип келген каатчылык мамлекеттин күчтүү жана көптөгөн алсыз жактарын толугу менен ачык айкын көрсөттү. Бул жыйындагы Рыскелди Саткенин эссеси билдиргендей, пандемия Кыргызстандагы саламаттыкты сактоо системасынын (оорукана орундары менен иштеген персоналы) потенциалын кыйратып, башкаруу, коррупция жана ачык-айкындыктын жок болушуна байланыштуу жергиликтүү маселелердин бетин ачкан. Мындай кырдаал пандемия менен алышууда мамлекетти алсыратканы ачык көрүндү. Ал убакта кычкылтек жана вентиляторлордун жетишсиздиги менен медициналык кызматкерлердин арасында күчөп таралган вирус өтө курч маселелер болуп турган. Ага кошумча болуп медициналык кызматкерлер жеке жана башка  коргонуу каражаттарынын жок болушуна дуушар болгон.[23] Пандемиянын алгач айларында чыныгы абал жаңылыштык менен тез тез катталып турган пневмониянын көлөкөсүндө калган. Пандемия жаңы пайда болгон учурда бийлик өкүлдөрү ага каршы керектүү чараларды колдонууга бел байлабастан, тескерисинче алардын арасында бири-бирине жоопкерчиликти ыргытуу оюну башталган. 1-апрельде ошол убакытттагы президент Жээнбеков баштапкы маалда вирусту алдын-алуу боюнча иш-аракеттери натыйжасыз болуп калганы үчүн COVID-19 вирусу боюнча атайын түзүлгөн группанын башчыларын кызматынан кетирген. Ал группанын башчылары Саламаттыкты сактоо министри Космосбек Чолпонбаев менен премьер-министрдин орун басары Алтынай Омурбекова болгон.[24] Кийин, 2020-жылдын ноябрь айында Чолпонбаевге шалакылык боюнча айып тагылып, консалтинг келишимин түзгөнү боюнча коркунучтары тараганынан улам камакка алынат.[25] Премьер-министр, Мухаммедкалый Абылгазиев 27-майда, демек каатчылыктын так ортосунда дем алууга чыгып, мындан эки жумадан кийин улуттук жыштыктарды сатууга байланышкан коррупциялык иштеринин айынан кызматынан кетет.[26] Абылгазиевди жөнөтүп жаткан күнү партиялаш министрлер маскасыз жүрүп, социалдык аралыкты сактабаганы видеокамерага түшүп, натыйжада, 28 саясатчы менен аткаминерлерге айып пулу жазылган.[27] Жөнөкөй жарандар ошол мезгилдеги кырдаалды башаламандык деп табышкан. Башка (Бишкек сыяктуу) ири шаарларга  барып келүүгө байланышкан жумуштардын ээлери жана бул шаарларда каттоосуз же башка расмий документсиз жашап жүргөн көптөгөн жарандар үчүн ички кыймылдын көзөмөлгө алынышы башаламандыкты жаратты десек жаңылбайбыз.[28] Каатчылык Кыргызстандын эл аралык институттар тарабынан ири көлөмдө ыкчам каржыланышына жол ачкан. 2020-жылдын июль айында жалпы жонунан Кыргызстандын эсебине 627,3 мииилон АКШ доллар каражаттары түшүп, бул акчалар кандай сарпталганы тууралуу отчеттор менен процесстин ачык-айкындыгы боюнча кооптор жаралды.[29] Буга карабастан, Кыргызстанда мамлекет жасаган иши оңунан чыкпай калганда, ортодо пайда болгон кооптуу кырдаалда ыктыярчылар чыгып, бейтапканалар менен башка медициналык мекемелерге өздөрүн аябастан жардам  берүүгө келишкен.[30] Жапаровдун администрациясы мурунку өкмөт 2020-жылдагы пандемиянын алгачкы толкунунда өлүмгө учураган адамдардын саны 1393 деп жашырганын аныктап, ал эми чындыгында каза тапкандардын саны 4000 жеткендигин далилдешкен.[31] Саламаттык сактоо министрилигине таянуу менен мындай каатчылык дүйнө жүзү боюнча орун алган жарандык эркиндикке чектөөлөрдүн коюлушун талап кылып, ошондой эле өкмөткө массалык маалымат каражатттары менен саясий эркиндикке кийинки чектөөлөрдү коюу мүмкүнчүлүктөрүн берди. Элира Турдубаева өз ишинде белгилегендей, көз карандысыз массалык маалымат каражаттар карантиндин убагында өлкөнүн сыртында өз ишин алып бара алган эмес, ал эми өкмөт болсо бей-өкмөт уюмдарга карата бюрократиялык чараларды күчөтүү боюнча мыйзамдарды кабыл алганы аракет жасаган. Атайын кызматтар дагы жөн отурбастан, өкмөт тарабынан пандемияга каршы көрүлгөн чараларды сындаган социалдык тармактардын колдонуучуларын (жеке коргонуу каражаттарынын жок болгонуна нааразычылыгын билдирген медициналык кызматкерелерди дагы)  камакка алынышын күчөткөн.[32] Даана парламенттик шайлоонун алдында экономикалык жана социалдык тармактары пандемиянын азабын тартып жатканына карабастан, алгач бай манаптар менен жергиликтүү бийликтин ортомчулардын ортосундагы шайлоого карата ички элиталык атаандаштыкты көрө алабыз деген ой болгон, анткени Кыргызстандын Социал-демократтардын партиясы (КСДП) кыйрагандан кийин партиялык система кайрадан түзүлүп баштаган.[33] Бирок, арадан көп өтпөй эле негизги иш-аракеттердин маңызы эки таасирдүү үй-бүлөлүк кландардын күчтөрүнүн кагылышуусунда жатканы билинип калды. Биринчиси “Биримдик” саясий партиясын тегеректегеп курчаган Жээнбековдун тарапташтары болсо (Сооронбай Жээнбековдун иниси, Асылбек Жээнбеков менен биргеликте), экинчиси өз аракетин шартту түрдө Жээнбековчул “Мекеним Кыргызстан” саясий партиясы аркылуу жүргүзгөн таасирдүү Матраимовдордун үй-бүлөсүнүн (булар тууралуу сөз төмөндө болмокчу) тармагына жакындалган тарапташтары болмокчу. Ыктыярчыларды колдонууга тыюу салган эрежелер потенциалы боюнча ресустарга бай жана мыкты камсыздалган “Биримдик”, “Мекеним Кыргызстан” жана (Жээнбековчул деп эсептелеген) Канатбек Исаевдин “Кыргызстан” партиялары менен алардын атаандаш партиялардын ортосунда чоң өксүктү жаратты.[34] Бирок, шайлоо алдындагы жүргүзүлгөн кампанияга сарпталуучу формалдуу чыгымдардан дагы маанилүүрөөк болуп, өткөн шайлоодо көнүмүш адатка айланып калган добуштарды сатып алуу практикасын улантып кетиши болгондур. Бул жолкусунда бир гана добуштардын массалык түрдө сатып алынышы менен чектелбестен, кошумча фактор болуп пандемия учурунда жасалган кайрымдуулук демилгелерине кыянаттык келтирип, салтка айланып калган админресурстардын (мамлекеттик мекемелер менен кызматкерлерин добушун берүүгө мажбурлоо) добушун Жээнбековдун партиясына салдыруу (кээ бир учурларда бул ички уруш-тартыш күчөп, мушташуулар менен аяктаганы сейрек эмес) сыяктуу иштери орун алган.[35] Октябрь айындагы шайлоого аттанышкан 17 саясий партиялардын ичинен  16сы жек көрүүчүлүк тилин пайдаланбоо боюнча БШКнын Жүрүм-турум кодексине кол коюшкан, бирок бул нерсе Интернет талаасында шайлоо алдындагы жүргүзүлгөн кампаниялардын учурунда көбүнчө көңүлгө алынбай калган. Учурдагы кырдаал: 2020-жылдын октябрь айынын баштап бүгүнкү күнгө чейинШайлоо күнү, 4-октябрда социалдык тармактарды шайлоодогу алдамчылык менен видеого катталган добуштардын сатып алынуусунун, бир адамдын бир нече адамдын ордуна добушту салганын жана шайлоочуларды бир шайлаган жеринен экинчи жерге алып барып, добушун бердиртип жаткандын сүрөттөрү жана видеожаздыруулар каптап кеткен. Демек, шайлоо участогунун адресин убактылуу алмаштыруу мүмкүнчүлүгүн кыянаттык менен колдонулганы ири масштабда көрүндү.[36] Шайлоолордо жүргүзүлгөн байкоо боюнча ЕККУнун акыркы отчетунда белгилегендей, ЕККУнун байкоо миссиясына “добуштарды сатып алуу жана админресурстарын кыянаттык менен пайдаланган учурлар тууралуу маектештерибизден өлкө боюнча көптөгөн ишеничтүү кабарлар келип жатты”.[37] Шайлоонун алдын ала жыйнытыгына ылайык “Биримдик” партиясы 24.50% көрсөткүчү менен “Мекеним Кыргызстан” партиясынын 23.79% көрсөткүчүнөн аз гана айырмачылык менен  жеңсе (демек 120 квоталык Жогорку Кеңеште бул эки партия 46 жана 45 оорунду ээлеп калмак), үчүнчү болгон “Кыргызстан” партиясы 8.7% артта калып, Жогорку Кеңеште 16 квотаны алмак.[38] Шайлоонун 7%дык босогосун аттай алган төртүнчү партиясы Жээнбековторго түздөн түз байланышы жок болгон жападан жалгыз “Бүтүн Кыргызстан” партиясы болду. Бул партия 2011 жана 2017-жылдардагы президенттик шайлоолорго катышып, Адахан Мадумаровдун жетекчилигинин алдында ишин алып барып келет. Шайлоо алдындагы жүргүзүлгөн сурам-жылоонун жыйынтыгы боюнча шайлоочулардын үчтөн бир гана бөлүгү учурдагы бийликтин пандемияга каршы көрүлгөн чараларын жетишеерлик деп эсептегенине карабастан шайлоонун жыйынтыгы жогоруда белгиленген көрсөткүчтөргө ээ болгон. Шайлоо алдындагы жүргүзүлгөн сурамжылоонун жыйынтыгы боюнча шайлоочулардын үчтөн бир гана бөлүгү учурдагы бийликтин пандемияга каршы көрүлгөн чараларын жетишеерлик деп эсептегенине карабастан шайлоонун жыйынтыгы жогоруда белгиленген көрсөткүчтөргө ээ болгон.[39] Шайлоонун алдын ала жыйынтыктары айтылганда, шайлоо босогосунан өтпөй калып, демек Жогорку Кеңештин жаңы чакырылышандагы орундарга илинбей калган көптөгөн партиялардын үгүттөөчүлөрү баш болуп 4-октябрдын кечки маалында шаардын борбордук «Ала-Тоо» аянты менен БШКнын имаратынын алдында нааразычылык акциясына чыга башташкан. Кийинки күндүн таңкы маалында аянтта жана Бишкектин көчөлөрүндө элдин саны орчундуу көбөйүп, мурунку күнү орун алган добуштарга байланыштуу алдамчылыктын фактыларына жана шайлоонун жалпы жыйынтыгына нааразычылыкты ачык билдире башташкан. Ал эми түшкү жана кечки маалга чейин “Ала-Тоо” аянтын каршылыгын билдирген эл толугу менен каптап, желектерди желбиретүү менен улуттук гимнди ырдай башташкан.[40] Бул убакытка чейин президент Сооронбай Жээнбековдун “Биримдик” партиясынын булактары шайлоону кайрадан өткөрүүгө макулдугун билдиришкен. Бирок, 5-октябрдын кечки маалында абал курчуп, милиция кызматкерлери Ак үйдүн алдындагы жана аянттагы чогулган элди таркатуу максатында суу замбиреги,  светошумовой граната менен жаш агызуучу газ аркылуу күч колдонуп, чыңалуу ого бетер күчөп кеткен.[41] Таңкы маал саат үчтө эл Ак Үйдүн ичиндеги президент Сооронбай Жээнбековдун кабинетине кирип келип, жада калса Улуттук Коопсуздуктун Мамлекеттик Комитетинин имаратын алып алууга үлгүргөн.[42] УКМКдан бошонуп чыккандардын арасында мурунку президент Алмазбек Атамбаев менен мурунку Жогорку Кеңештин депутаты Садыр Жапаров болушкан.[43] Асель Доолоткелдиеванын айтымына ылайык Жээнбеков менен сүйлөшүүлөрдү жүргүзүү мүмкүнчүлүгүн түп тамырынан алсырата турган “Ала-Тоо” аянтындагы нааразычылыгын көрсөтүп жаткан оппозициялык топторго Атамбаев эпсиз кошулуу аракетин жасагыча, Садыр Жапаровго анын колдоочулары кошулушкан. Эгер Атамбаевдин кадамы либералдык лагеринин мыйзамдуулугун алсыратса, Жапаровдун колдоочулары улутчул топтор менен спортчулардын аралашмасынан түзүлүп, кийин Эски аянтты курчап алышкан.[44] Жапаров түрмөдөн бошотулгандан кийин бир күн өтө электе эле 6-октябрь күнү кечки маалда “Достук” мейманканасында чөк түшүрүп олтурган 4-октябрга чейинки Жогорку Кеңештин акыркы чакырылышынын бир топ депуттары убактылуу премьер-министр кызматына Садыр Жапаровту коюшат.  Бирок, кийинчирээк бул импровизацияланган чогулушту мыйзамсыз деп тапкан оппозиция тарабы ал жыйынды токтотот. Тынчтыкка чакырган видеолордун үзүндүлөрүн эске албаганда, президент Сооронбай Жээнбеков такыр эле жердин астына кирип кеткендей болгондуктан, сыртта атаандашкан фракциялар өздөрү колдой турган жетекчилик тууралуу жарыя жасашып, либералдык оппозиция жаш ишкерди, Тилек Токтогазиевди сунушташат. Чыңалуу бара бара туу чокусуна 9-октябрга туура келип, Жапаров менен оппозициянын тарапташтары мушташып, мурунку президент Алмазбек Атамбаевдин унаасына ок атылат. Муну менен чачырап кеткен оппозициянын кыймылынын жана либералдык ой-жүгүртүүгө жакын болгон митингчилердин эсебинен күчтүн тең салмактуулугу Жапаровдун колдоочуларынын пайдасына өтүп кетет. Бишкек саясий төңкөрүштү башынан кечирип жаткан кезде милициянын туруктуу көзөмөлү жок болгондуктан, көчөлөрдө шаардык тургундардан, ыктыярчылардан жана жөнөкөй жарандардан турган элдик кошуун пайда болгон.[45]  2005 менен 2010-жылдардагы төңкөрүштөрдөн кийинки орун алган уурдап-тоноо иш аракеттерин кайталатпастан, бул ыктыярчылар шаардын ичиндеги райондор боюнча бөлүнүп, жергиликтүү дүкөндөр менен башка бизнестерди коргоп калуу аракетин жасашкан.[46] Бара бара 10 жана 14-октябрь күндөрү Жапаров акыры расмий түрдө Парламентте добуш берүү системасынын негизинде премьер-министр болуп шайланып, бул иш Жапаровдун колдоочулары парламентке коркутуу-үркүтүү жасады деген айыптар менен коштолгон.[47] 15-октябрь күнү Жээнбеков акыры президент кызматын бошотуп, анын ордуна убактылуу шарты менен (премьер-министр кызматына кошо) Жапаров келип, өз жолун туткундан президентикке чейин 10 күндүн ичинде басып аяктаган.[48] Кыскача айтканда, оппозиция биригип, учурдагы абалга альтернативаны сунуштай алат деген кыска үмүт такыр өчтү, себеби шаттанган, бирок даярдыгы жок болуп калган активисттер төңкөрүштө жеткен жеңишин кандай пайдаланаарын билбей, жаш активисттер менен улуу муундүн өкүлдөрү ортосунда келишпестик ортого чыккан.  Анткени, төңкөрүштүн маанилүүлүгүн эскертүү аракетин жасаган оппозициялык саясатчылар улуу муундагы активисттерди жетиштүү түрдө каралашкан.[49] Тыңыраак, мобилизациянын жаңы ыкмаларын колдоно билген, кесипкөй эмес инсандын элесин жаратып, өзүнүн жолунда чыныгы колдоочуларды чогулта билген Жапаров саясий аренада пайда болгон боштукту толтурган. Бирок, мурунку “оюнчулар”, өзгөчө экс-президент Бакиев менен болгон байланыштардын үзүлбөгөнү байкалып, мурунку шайлоолордун фальсификациясына катышкан башка көптөгөн көмүскө күчтөргө тиешеси бар деп шектелүүдө.[50] Жапаровдун көтөрүлүшү                                                                    Садыр Жапаров саясий аренада биринчи жолу 2005-жылы Жоогазын төңкөрүшүнөн кийин парламентке депутат болуп келген. Кийин, Бакиевчилерге каршы коррупция айыбы коюлуп жаткан убакта Коррупцияны алдын алуу боюнча Улуттук агенттигинде иштеп жаткан Жапаров ошол убакыттагы президент Курманбек Бакиевтин кеңешчиси болуп дайындалат. 2010-жылдагы төңкөрүштөн кийин Жапаров Бакиевдин аркасынан Ош шаарына барып, ошол убакта этникалык өзбектер менен кыргыз улутчулдардын отртосундагы этника аралык жаңжалына күбө болгон.[51] Жапаров мурунку Өзгөчө кырдаал министри Камчыбек Ташиевдин “Ата-Журт” партиясынан депутат катары Оштогу жаңжалдан кийин кайра пайда болот. Ал партия Бакиевдин кайтып келишин колдоп, президенттин укугун жойгон 2010-жылдагы референдумдун токтотулушуна өз салымын кошкон. Ошентсе да, Жапаровдун “Күмтөрдүн” акцияларына ээлик кылган канадалык фирмага карата каршы жасаган иш-аракеттери аны бир жагынан таанымал кылса, экинчи жагынан жаман атка кондурган.[52] Шахтаны мамлекеттештирүүгө чакырып, бул алтын кен булагына ээлик кылган “Центерра” мамлекетке төлөгөн салыгы аз деп айыптоо менен 2012-жылы Жапаров уюштурган чуулуу чогулушунда Ташиевдин чагымчыл сөзүн кээ бирөөлөр Ак үйдү алыш керек экен деп түшүнүп алышкан. Ташиевдин кээ бир тарапташтары Ак үйдүн ичине кирүүгө далалат кылышып, Ташиев аларды тосмодон өткөрүү аракетин жасаганы тууралуу билдирүүлөр бар болгон.[53]  Жапаров дагы, Ташиев дагы кылмыш иш-аракеттерге айыпталып, бул тергөө иштин алкагында парламенттеги орундарынан ажыратылышкан.[54] 2013-жылдагы Жапаровдун “Кумтөргө” каршы кампаниясы  Исык-Көл облусунда жайгашкан  “Кумтөр” алтын кенинин тегерегинде көп айларга созулган нааразылык акцияларына алып келген. 2013-жылдын октябрь айында нааразылыкка чыккан элдин астына келген өкмөт өкүлү Эмиль Каптагаевди унаанын ичине күчтөп салып, ал унаанын үстүнө бензин төгүп жана унаа өзү менен кошо өрттөлөт деген коркунуч орун алган.[55] Ал убакытта Жапаров бир нече күн мурун өлкөдөн чыгып кеткен болуп, бул окуялардын учурунда өзү жок болгону менен кийин ага зордукту козутуу айыбы тагылган. Каптагаев сот ишин сынга алып, “сот адилеттик системасында акыйкат өлгөн” деп айткан сөздөрүнө карабастан, Жапаров 2017-жылы Кыргызыстанга кайтып келгенине чейин куугунтукта жүрүп, келгенден кийин Каптагаев иши боюнча  11,5 жылга кесилип кетет.[56] СИЗО менен түрмөдө өткөзгөн убакыттын ичинде ата-энеси менен уулунун өлүмдөрүн башынан кечирип, өзүнө кол салуу аракетин дагы жасап көргөн. Бул кадамы өзүн саясий инсан катары таанытып, жеке кызыкчылыктарга каршы жүргүзгөн үгүттүн азабын өз башы менен тартып жатканы көрүндү. Түрмөдө отурганына карабастан, өзүнүн эски саясатчы-өнөктөшү, төрагалыкты аткарып келген Камчыбек Ташиев менен биргеликте “Мекенчил” саясий партиясын жетектеген. 4-октябрь күнү чуулуу шайлоодо “Мекенчил” партиясы квоталарга ээ болуп калуу үчүн жети пайыздык босогосуна бираз жетпеген 6,85% көрсөткүчү менен жаңы Жогорку Кеңешинин курамына кирбей калган партиялардан эң көп добуш алган. Бирок, башка саясий партиялар добуштарды массалык түрдө сатып алганына байланыштуу, Жапаровко көрсөтүлгөн колдоону “Мекенчил” партиясы топтогон добуштардын көрсөткүчү көп деле чагылдырган жок. Бул жыйынга кирген эсселерде жана мурунку иштеринде Жолдон Кутманов менен Гулзат Баялиева Жапаров өз саясий брендин түзүүдө Фэйсбуктун ойногон маанилүү ролун, фальсификацияланган шайлоодон кийин пайда болгон саясий боштондукту толтуруу максатында тарапташтарын чогултууда WhatsApp тиркеменин, ал жана анын командасы интернет аймагында колдоочуларын табууда Инстаграм менен орусиялык “Одноклассники” сыяктуу социалдык тармактардын тийгизген пайдасын жана маанилүүлүгүн баса белгилешкен. Дээрлик, бардык социалдык тармактарда иштеп, мурунку адаттагыдай эле добуштарды сатып алуу менен саясий сооданын салттуу ыкмаларына көбүрөөк ишенген башка саясатчылардын жанында Жапаровдун командасы өздөрүн мыкты жагынан көрсөткөн.[57] Жогоруда белгиленген социалдык тармактардагы группалардын арасында айланып жүргөн саясий билдирүүлөр Жапаровдун аброюн актап, адилетсиз түрмөгө камалып, “Кумтөр” маселеси боюнча коррупцияланган элиталарга каршы чыга алган баатыр катары көрсөткөнү аракеттенишкен. Мындай кептер социалдык-консервативдик улуттук риторика жана батышка каршы көз караштар менен кайчылашып, бул көрүнүш акыркы жылдардын ичинде пайда болгон улутчул жана неоконсервативдик маанайлардын негизинде түзүлгөн “Мекенчил” партиясынын интернет маалымат булактарынын тегерегинде байкалган.[58] Бул тууралуу сөздөр жана сандар Орусиядан кайтып келген жумушсуз калган эмгек мигранттар менен аймактык тургундарынын арасынан Жапаровдун колдоочуларын бириктире  алган. Жыйынтыгында кайтып келген мигранттар Бишкектин көчөлөрүнө өздөрү чыгып, алардын чыгышы кийин мамлекеттин, либералдык ой-жүгүрткөн (көбүнчө шаардык) жаштардын жана адаттагы оппозициялык топтордун күчүн сындыра алган. Садырдын кийинки кадамы Жапаров убактылуу президенттин милдетин аткарган кызматына бекитилгенден кийин, коопсуздук кызматынын жетекчилигин өзүнүн мурунку саясий өнөктөшү Камчыбек Ташиевге ишенип берүү менен бийликтин маанилүү баскычтарына өз таасирин күчөткөн.[59] Ташиевдин буйругу менен болушунча жарнамаланган жана кээ бир адамдардын ою боюнча алдын-ала ойлонуштурулган бир нече кадамдардын жасалганын көрдүк. Бир жагынан мындай аракеттердин жасалышы коррупцияга каршы иштерине олуттуу кирише баштаганын белгиси болгондой.[60] Райымбек Матраимовдун кармалышы жана сотко чейинки абакка киргизилиши менен анын тармагына катышы бар деп шектелген кырктай (40) жакындарына карата тергөө иштери башталганы билдирилген.[61] 30 күндүк “Экономикалык мунапыс” демилгесинин алкагында ырайымды алуу үчүн Матраимов мамлекеттин казынасына 2 миллиард сом (23,6 миллион АКШ доллар) төгүүгө макул болгондугу жарыяланган. Бул демилге мурунку аткаминерлер менен паракорчулуктан пайда көргөндөргө мыйзамсыз тапкан кирешелерин мамлекетке кайтаруу мүмкүнчүлүгүн бермек.[62] Матраимовтор менен байланышкан интернет-троллдордун уюшулган топтору тарабынан көзөмөлдөнгөн фэйк аккаунтарынын тармагы мурун “Мекеним Кыргызстан” саясий партиясын алдыга илгерилесе, кийин көңүлүн жаңы убактылуу президентти колдоого бурган.[63] Өлкө боюнча Жээнбековдун өкмөтүнө тиешелүү болгон жергиликтүү мансапкерлерди ээлеген кызматтарынан бошотушкан. Пайда болгон алгачкы башаламандыкта мурунку Бишкек шаарынын мэри Нариман Тюлеев менен карама-каршылыкты жаратып, 2010-жылдагы этника аралык жаңжалына катуу аралашкан Ош шаарынын мурунку мэри Мелис Мырзакматов сыяктуу Бакиевдин убагындагы ишкерлер өздөрүнүн мурунку кызматтарын басып алууга аракет жасашкан. Жаңы бийликтин күмөндүү колдоочулары маанилүү кызматтардын үстүнөн көзөмөлдү колго алганга чейин Тюлеев кыска мөөнөткө мэр болууга үлгүргөн.[64] Бийликте башаламандык башталып, фракциялар аралык соодалашуунун ортосунда мамлекеттик кызматтардын жетектөө орундарын Жапаров жана Ташиев менен жеке жана саясий байланыштары болгон кишилер тез эле басып алышкан. Оппозиция тарапка өткөн ишмер Тилек Токтогазиев жогоруда белгиленип кеткен адамдардан өзгөчөлөндү. Тилек Токтогазиев өзүн  өлкө лидери деп жарыялаганына карабастан, ал жаатта ийгиликке жеткен эмес, бирок оппозициянын талаптарын канааттандыруу үчүн убактылуу өкмөттүн курамында Айыл чарба министрилигинин башчысына дайындалат.[65] Убактылуу өкмөттүн жасаган бардык куу кадамдарын расмий легитимдештирүү аракеттеринин негизинде 15-октябрда мөөнөтү бүткөн мандаттарга ээ болгон Жогорку Кеңештин мүчөлөрүнүн макулдугу жаткан. Бишкектин көчөлөрүн каптаган протестчилердин Парламенттик шайлоону кайрадан өткөрүү алгачкы талабын тез тез ишке ашыруу боюнча аракеттенүүнүн ордуна Жапаров өз көңүлүн жеке саясий кызыкчылыктарына буруп алат.[66] Анын кызыкчылыктарына жаңыдан Президенттик шайлоонун өткөрүлүшү аркылуу өз укуктарын легитимдештирүү менен 2010-жылдан кийин жөнгө салынган конституцияны жокко чыгарууну камтыган эски саясий максатына жетүүсү кирген. Албетте, президент кызматында иштеген Жапаровго мындай кадам президенттин ролун жогорулатууга жол ачып берүүсү анын чырагына май тамызгандай эле. Жаңы саясий бийликтин зоболосун эл-аралык дэңгээлде жогорулатуу максатында болжол менен Жапаровду колдогон бизнесмендердин бири финансалык колдоо көрсөтүп, коомдук байланыштар менен пиар жаатында 1 миллион АКШ долларга келишим түзүлгөн.[67] Ошентип, президент кызматында иштеген бир айга жетпеген убакыт аралыгында 14 ноябрь күнү Жапаров бул ордунан баш тартып, 2021-жылдын 10-январында мөөнөтүнөн мурун өтө турчу президенттик шайлоо боюнча кампанияны жасоого жетишет. Ташиевдин мурунку “Ата-Журт” партиясынын депутаты Талант Мамытов хореографиялык маңызда ноябрдын башында маңкурт-өкмөтүнүн спикери болуп шайланып, Жапаровго президенттик шайлоого аттануу мүмкүнчүлүгүн берүү менен  президент милдеттерин аткаруучу кызматына жаңыдан келген.[68] Жапаровдун мурунку биринчи вице премьер-министр кызматында иштеген жаш мамлекеттик кызматкер Артем Новиков ыйгарым укуктуу премьер-министр кызматына жогорулатылган. Экилтик мыйзам долбоорунун экинчи бөлүгү президенттин укуктарын күчөтүп, Жапаров убадалаган өлкөнү башкаруу формасын тандоо боюнча референдум 10-январда президенттик шайлоо менен биргеликте өтөөрү белгиленди. Башында конституциянын мыйзам долбоорун макулдашуу максатында уюштурула турган референдумду 17-ноябрь күнү Жогорку Кеңеш кабыл алып, депуттатардын арасынан төртөөсү гана (Дастан Бекешев, Айсулуу Мамашова, Наталья Никитенко жана Каныбек Иманалиев) референдумга каршы добушун беришкен. Мындай олуттуу чечим кабыл алынып жатканда жалпы 120 кишиден 64 гана депутат Жогорку Кеңештин имаратында отурушкан. Бул факт мындай сунуштун күмөндүүлүгүн гана чагылдырбастан, ошондой эле конституциялык процессти мандатынын мөөнөтү өтүп кеткен депутаттардын жамааты мыйзамсыз башкарганын көрсөттү.[69] Бул жыйын жарыкка чыккан убакытта бул маселе чаташып калганы кеңири таралган, себеби бул чечим кабыл алынып жатканда кол койгон бир нече депутаттар кол койгондугун танып, бул мыйзам долбоорун көрбөгөнүн жана бул чаралардын кээ бирин колдобогондугун билдиришкен.[70] Конституциянын жаңы мыйзам долбоору Жапаровдун ой-жүгүртүүсү жана аны тегеректеп курчап алган кээ бир улутчул топтордун реформаларынын баалуулуктары менен шайкеш келгендиги таң калаарлык эмес.[71] Бул окшоштук мыйзам долбоорундагы көчмөн салтынын негизинде иш алып барган “Элдик Курултай” деген кеңешме форумду түзө турган беренелерде байкалган. “Курултай” демилгесинин тарапташтары да, каршы болгондор да “Курултайды” учурдагы Жогорку Кеңештин ролу менен функцияларын узурпациялоонун бир жолу катары көрүшкөн.[72] Мындай көрүнүштүн иш жүзүндө мисал катары Казак Элинин Ассамблеясы жана Түркменистандын Элдик Кеңеши (кээ бир учурларда Аксакалдардын Кеңеши деп аталат) болуп бере алат. Биринчиси жергиликтүү жыйындардын өкүлдөрүнөн түзүлсө, экинчиси болсо мүчөлөрдүн шайлануусун авторитардык көзөмөлдөө укугуна ээ болуп, мамлекеттин саясий жетектөө мекемесинин ролун аткарат.  Жаңы Конституциянын сунушталган мыйзам долбоору боюнча Жапаровдун президенттик укуктары күчөтүлмөкчү. Мисалы мындай жаңылануулар киргизилген: жаңы мыйзам долбоору боюнча, президент 5 жылдык 2 мөөнөт катары менен өз талапкерлигин коё алат; Премьер-министр менен министрлер, бөлүмдөр жана жергиликтүү бийликтин өкүлдөрү президент тарабынан дайындалат. Буга кошумча болуп, Жогорку Кеңеште отурган депутаттардын санын 120дан 90го түшүрүү сунушталган. “Маданият жана   адеп-ахлакка” же “Кыргыз элинин  салт-сааналары менен жалпы таанылган моралдык баалуулуктарына” каршы келген маалыматтардын жана массалык маалымат каражаттарынын таркалышына тыюу салган Баш мыйзамдын 23-беренеси эл-аралык коомчулукту өзгөчө дүрбөттү.[73] Жаңы сунушталып жаткан Башмыйзам иш жүзүндө кандай өзгөрүүлөргө алып келээрин аныктоо иштери жаңы түзүлгөн Конституциялык кеңешмесине жүктөлгөн. Ал кеңешме сунушталган өзгөрүүлөрдү коомдук талкууга алып чыгып, ал өзгөртүүлөрдү кеңейтүү сунушун бериши керек болчу.[74] Бирок, 10-декабрга чейин ички талаш-тартыш, жарандык нааразычылык менен эл аралык коомчулуктун терс реакциясынын басымынан улам кырдаал толугу менен өзгөрүп, Конституциянын толук мыйзам долбоорун январь айында өтүлчү референдумга коюлушу четке кагылган. Анын ордуна шайлоочуларга башкаруу формасын тандап алуу мүмкүнчүлүгүн ортого чыгарып, деталдуу маалыматтары кийинирээк берилмекчи.[75] Октябрь окуяларынан кийин моралдык жактан алсырап калган либералдуу ой-жүгүрткөн опппозиция жогоруда белгиленген процессти легитимсыз (мыйзамсыз) деп табууга далалат жасап, Башмыйзамдын алгачкы мыйзам долбоорунун кабыл алынуусуна тоскоолдук жаратуу максатында референдумду бүдөмүктөөгө аракеттенген. Көпчүлүктү өзүнө караткан лидер болуп, жана президенттик шайлоону адилеттүү жеңүү жолун таба билген күчтүү талапкери жок болгонуна карабастан, Садыр Жапаров талапкерлердин ортосунда коомдук дебаттарга келбей, өз саясий кампаниясын жүргүзүү процессине кылдат мамиле жасаган. Октябрда чуулгандуу өткөн шайлоого караганда, январдагы шайлоо жана референдум тынч өттү.[76]  Шайлоо менен референдумга шайлоочулардын келген саны төмөн болуп, 39,75% жана 39,88% түзгөн. Шайлоого катышкандардын берген добуштары боюнча президенттик шайлоону 79%  менен Жапаров жеңип, референдумда келген шайлоочулардын 80% президенттик башкаруу формасын колдошкон.[77] Шайлоочулардын аз гана бөлүгү келгенинин себептери бир нече факторлорго байланыштуу болгон, алар: жылдын мезгили, пандемия боюнча коркунучтар жана шайлоонун жыйынтыгы алдын ала белгилүү болгондугу. Көптөгөн оппозиция өкүлдөрү бул иш легитимдүү эмес өтүп жатканын белгилеп, бул жыйындын бир катар авторлору айткандай, шайлоонун бул жолкусунда Жапаровдун үгүт иштеринде добуштардын ачык сатып алуу учурлары 4 октябрдагы жана мурунку шайлоолорго караганда кыйла аз болгон. Мындай көрүнүштүн бирден бир себеби октябрь айынан баштап админресурстарынын басып алынышы, Жапаровдун жеке айланасы менен колдоону талкалай турган паракорчулукка эл өз ыктыяры менен жол бергендиги ачыкка чыкканы болгон. Ошондуктан, добуштарды сатып алууга болгон муктаждык четке кагылган. Авторитаризмге алып келчү коркунучун камтыган президенттик ыйгарым укуктарын кескин кеңейтилишинин колдогон коомду акыркы он жыл аралыгында саясий аренасын каптап кеткен жаңы жүздөр менен фракциялар жана жакында эле болгон башаламындыктын алып келген натыйжасы десек болот. Ошондой эле, мындай кубулуш элдин кээ бир бөлүгүн (ошондой эле жергиликтүү байкоочулардын кээ бири) 15 жылдын ичинде үч президентти алмаштыргандан кийин парламент менен партиялардын өзөгүндө жаткан саясий күчтөрдүн кеңири тараган тармагын чындап өзгөрткөндөн көрө бир президентти кызматынан кетирүү жеңилирээк болот деген ойго алып келген. Февраль айынын башында 48 мүчөнүн ордуна 16 мүчөдөн турган кичирээк, жаңы министрлердин кабинети түзүлүп, көптөгөн мамлекеттик мекемелер менен министрликтер бириктирилген.[78] Жаңы министрлердин кабинетинин жетекчилигине Эсептөө палатасынын мурунку төрагасы Улукбек Марипов келип, биринчи вице-премьер кызматына Артем Новиков кайрадан келген.[79] Убактылуу өкмөттүн курамына илинип калган Эльвира Сурабалдиева менен Тилек Токтогазиев сыяктуу Жапаровдун сынчылары өз кызматтарын сактай албагандары таң калычтуу эмес.[80] Марипов өкмөттүн жетекчилигине дайындалганы жарыяланганда, анын жетекчилик кылуусуна каршы кичи нааразылык акциясы болгон. Элдин каршылыгына Мариповтун атасы, мурунку депутатка коюлган күнөөлөр себеп болгон.[81] Кыргызстанда бийлик алмашууда көнүмүш адатка айлангандай эле, мыйзам бузууларга тиешелүү болгон мурунку бийликтин кызмат кишилерине жана/же бийликтен алыс болгон учурда жаңы тузүлгөн өкмөттүн өкүлдөрүн жазалагандарга карата доо иштеринин саны өскөн. Ошентсе да, учурдагы ушул сыяктуу иш аракеттердин ылдамдыгы менен масштабы (президенттик шайлоодогу Жапаровдун мурунку эки атаандашы менен мурунку өкмөттүн жогорку кызматтагы аткаминерлерин эске алып) тынчсыздануунун кошумча себебин туудурууда. Конституциялык жыйында болуп өткөн талкулоодон кийин 9-февраль күнү парламент кайрадан каралып чыккан Конституциянын долбоорун жарыялады.[82] “Адилет” юридикалык клиникасы белгилегендей, Конституциялык жыйындын талкулоосунан жана коомдун басымынан улам Баш мыйзамдын долбоорунун октябрь айындагы жарыяланган биринчи вариантына караганда учурдагы нускасында бир нече оң өзгөртүүлөр киргизилгендиги байкалды. “Моралдык баалуулуктардын үстөмдүгүнө болгон көптөгөн шилтемелер өчүрүлүп, балдар эмгегин колдонуу, ошондой эле баланын кызыкчылыктарынын жогорку дэңгээлде камсыздалышы жана кулчулукка жол берилбестиги тууралуу нормалар каралган. Адамдын  маданият, экономикалык жана социалдык укуктардын кепилдигин бекемдеген жаңы жоболор пайда болгон”. [83]  Элдик курултайды түзүү боюнча сунуштары басаңдалганы көрүнүүдө, анткени баштапкы вариантына караганда, оңдолгон мыйзам долбоорунда бул органдын расмий укуктары кыскартылган. Эгерде башында Элдик курултайдын негизги максаты бийлик бутактарындагы мекемелерине кеңеш берүү болгон болсо, азыркы нускасында бул орган өз ишин сотторду тандоодо аткармакчы.  Премьер-министр кызматы толугу менен жоюлуп, ошол эле убакта Конституциянын жаңы мыйзам долбоору боюнча Президенттин Аппарат башчысын “министрлердин кабинетинин төрагалыгына” шайлоо сунушталууда. Ошондо дагы, бей-өкмөт уюмдар менен эл аралык байкоочуларды тынчсыздандыра ала турган эки маселе ортого чыгууда. Биринчиси Баш мыйзамдын доолборунун 8.4 беренесинде камтылган, ал жерде “Саясий партиялар, профсоюздар жана башка коомдук бирикмелердин финансалык жана экономикалык ишмердүүлугүнүн ачык-айкын жүргүзүүгө тийиш” деген талабы коюлуп, ал зыяны жоктой көрүнгөнү менен, бей-өкмөт уюмдардын жүгүн конституциялык жол аркылуу оорлоштуруу аракети бар деген коркунучу жаралууда (ылдыйда талкууланмакчы). “Адилет” юридикалык клиниканын серепчилери “моралдык баалуулуктар” бөлүмү кайрадан каралганы менен, Баш мыйзам долбоорунда дагы деле 10.4 беренеси бар экенине басым жасоодо. Ал берене “Өсүп келе жаткан муунду коргоо максатында Кыргыз Республикасынын элинин коомдук аң-сезими менен моралдык жана этикалык баалуулуктарга карама-каршы келген иш-чараларга мыйзам боюнча чектөө киргизилиши мүмкүн” деген ойду чагылдырган. Конституциялык кеңешменин мүчөлөрүнүн оюна караганда, кайрадан каралып чыккан берене батыштагы порнография сыяктуу зыян тийгизе турган нерселерден балдарды коргоо боюнча конституциялык жоболору менен шайкеш келүүдө.[84]  Буга окшогон беренелер Орусия сыяктуу башка өлкөлөрдө ЛГБТ жана аялдар укуктары  менен башка социалдык-маданий маселелерди ачыкка чыгарып талкуу жургузуугө жана ал маселелери боюнча активдүүлүккө чектөөлөрдү киргизүү үчүн колдонулган. Ошондой эле, максаттуу аудиторияга багытталбаганына карабастан, жаш балдардын психологиясына терс таасирин тийгизерине байланыштуу кээ бир адамдар тарабынан “салттуу” баалуулуктарга карама-каршы келет деп эсептелген контент менен искусствого цензура коюлган. Президент Жапаров 2021-жылдын 11-апрелде Конституциялык референдумду жергиликтүү кеңештерге шайлоолор менен бир күндө өткөрүү ниетин билдирип, кийинки өзгөрүүлөрдү талап кылуу үчүн жарандык коомдун саналуу гана убактысы калган.[85] Бул жыйын биринчи жолу жарык көргөндөн кийин, 2021-жылдын 11-апрелинде болуп өткөн Конституциялык шайлоого шайлоочулардын 35% гана келгенине карабастан, алардын ичинен 79%дын  макулдугу менен Баш мыйзамдын жаңы долбоору кабыл алынган. Жаңы Конституцияга Президент кол коюп, 2021-жылдын 5-май күнү расмий түрдө күчүнө кирген. Учурда Жапаров Кыргызстандын саясий иерархиясынын туу чокусунда болуп турганы талашсыз. Башкаруу системасын өздүк жетектөө таризине ылайыкташтырууга болгон аракетин активдүү жумшап жатканы көрүнүүдө. Бирок, Кыргызстан дагы деле экономикалык, социалдык жана саламаттыкты сактоо жаатында олуттуу көйгөйлөргө дуушар болуп, берилген убадаларынын аткарылышына басым жасалууда.  Жапаровдун президенттикке талапкер болуусу эл аралык коомчулук тарабынан сындуу көз караш менен кабыл алынып, буга байланыштуу анын Орусия, Кытай, Батыш жана эл аралык институттар менен болгон мамилелери анын бийликке келишине чейин эле татаалдашты. Бирок, донорлор менен чет өлкөлүк инвесторлорду тынчытуу максатында өзүнүн экономикалык улутчул иш-аракеттеринин кээ бирлеринен баш тарткан, анткени өлкөнү кыйын абалдан чыгарып кетүү үчүн эл аралык жардамдын маанилүүлүгүн түшүнө баштаган.  Улутчул иш-аракеттерине Жапаровду белгилүү кылган (түрмөгө да отургузган) Кумтөрдү мамлекеттештирүү чакырыктарынан алгачкы маалда алыс болуусу дагы кирет. Бирок, бул басылма жарыялангандан кийин эле, Жапаров кайра өз көз карашын өзгөртүп,  парламент “Кумтөр” тоо кенин убактылуу мамлекеттик көзөмөлгө алган чаралады кабыл улууга добушун берген. Ошондой эле, Кыргызстандын өкмөтү шахтанын канадалык ээлери салыктарды төлөбөй, мамлекетке 170 миллион АКШ доллар карыз болуп калганы тууралуу билдирүү жасаган.[86] Кен байлыктарын казууга уруксат эл аралык компанияларга берилбестиги тууралуу Жапаров бир нече жолу кайталап айтып, бирок учурда түзүлүп калган келишимдер бузулбастыгын белгилеген. Аны менен кошо, Жапаров Кыргызстандын эң маанилүү болуп эсептелген тоо кен секторундагы боштукту толтуруу үчүн жергиликтүү компанияларды керектелген заманбап техникалык каражаттары менен камсыздоо маселелерин көтөрүп чыккан.[87] Мурунку айтылган сөздөрүнө күмөндөрдү жаратып, табигый ресурстардын, кубаттуулуктун жана кен байлыктарын казуу жаатында кеңейтилген кызматташтыкты көздөгөн жаңы алкактык келишими Кыргызстан менен Түркиянын ортосунда түзүлгөндүгү 24-февралда белгилүү болду.[88] Жапаровдун жеке саясий брэндинин өзөгүн анти элиталык улутчулдук негиздеп, учурда жасаган иштеринде пайда болгон этияттык аны реалдуу саясий тобокелге салып, Жапаровдун популисттик көңүлү башка нерселерге бурулабы деген суроо ачык бойдон турат. Аксана Исмаилбекова белгилегендей, этникалык улутчулдук (Бакиевтер менен байланыштары бар болгонуна карабастан) Жапаровдун саясатынында башкы орунду ээлеген эмес, бирок анын онлайн тарапташтары алда канча тереңирээк маданият менен консервативдүү мүнөзгө ээ болгонун эске алуу зарыл. Бирок алардын арасында кээ бирөөлөрү этникалык улутчулду колдоп, диний кызматына от башы менен кирип кеткендер дагы болгондуктан, эгерде иштер начарлай баштаса азчылыктардын топтору өсүп жаткан басмырлоонун таасирин сезиши мүмкүн деген коркунучтар пайда болууда.  Жапаров менен Трамп президенттердин ортосунда аналогиялар бир нече жолу жүргүзүлгөн. Георгий Мамедовдун сөздөрүнө караганда, Трамп жана Жапаров экөө тең “саясатты тирешүү (конфоронтация) катары” түшүнүшүп, “өлкө кичи топтун кызыкчылыктарынан улам сазга батып отурат” деген сөздү айтуу менен мындай түшүнүктү чагылдырган риториканы Жапаров чындап эле колдонгон (бирок өзүн популист деген атка конуудан алыс туруу аракетин жасаган).[89] Күчтүү президент институтун курулушун жан дили менен каалаган Жапаров (бул каалосу анын президентикке келгенге чейин бир топ мурун эле билинчү) жылдап бюрократиялык натыйжасыздык менен ыраатсыздыктан бөлүктөргө ураган өлкөнү бириктирип, күчтөнгөн бир мамлекетти көрүүгө болгон каалоосунун чагылдырып турган. Бул кадам Путиндин өз башкаруусун легитимдештирүү макcатында мамлекетти бекемдөөдө жасаган аракеттерине окшошуп кетээри байкалууда. Биз учурдагы кырдаалга кантип келдик – Системалык көйгөйлөрКыргызстандын учурдагы кырдаалага кептелип калганынын себеби көптөгөн жылдар бою мамлекет ичиндеги иштер аябай эле көп адамдар үчүн туура нукта кетпегенине байланыштуу болушу мүмкүн. Кыргызстанды тегеректеп турган, демократиялык абалы коркунучтуу болгон башка аймактарга салыштырмалуу, Кыргызстан орто дэңгээлде сактай алган ачык-айкындыгы үчүн эл аралык коомчулук кубаттап, мактагысы келгендиги бир нече убакыттын ичинде Кыргызстан дуушар болгон терең түзүлүштүк маселелердин кичирейтилишине же көңүлгө алынбай калышына алып келгендир.  Мындай кырдаалдын түзүлүп калгандыгынын себеби бир гана жакшы жаңылыктарга бай мамлекеттин репутациясын куруу гана болбостон, Кыргызстан салыштырмалуу ачык-айкын өлкө болгонуна байланыштуу көптөгөн уюмдар үчүн аймактык борборго айланып, бул кырдаалды бузууга эч кимдин ниети жоктой эле. “Борбордук Азиядагы жалгыз демократиялуу” өлкөнүн жарандарында мындай “демократия” көбүнчө натыйжасыз жыйынтыктарга алып келүү менен демократиянын кызыктуулугун төмөндөгөнү туурасында ойлонуп чыгууга болгон муктаждык бар. Ошондой эле, мындай көрүнүш кыргызстандыктардын (Кыргызстандагы абалды “башаламандык” деп мүнөздөгөн бул аймактагы башка өлкөлөрдүн жарандарынын дагы) либералдуу институтун куруу мүмкүнчүлүгүнө болгон ишенимин актай алган эмес. Асель Доолоткелдиева менен Жасмин Кэмерон өз иштеринде белгилегендей, мамлекеттин бийлик өкүлдөрү мурунку төңкөрүштөрдөн алуучу сабактарды өздөштүрө албай келе жатат.[90] Ширин Айтматова жана башкалар билдиргендей, Советтер Союзу кыйрагандан кийин тышкы көрүнүшү үчүн гана түзүлгөн институттар өтө көп учурларда жөн гана сырткы фасадды түзүп, чыныгы бийлик ал фасаддын астында иш жүргүзүп, алардын имараттары ижарага берилген. Мындай көрүнүш эл аралык донорлордун миллиарддаган жардамына карабай болуп келсе, кээ бир учурларда бул кырдаал дал ошол жардамдын айынан түзүлгөн.[91] Пандемияга чейинки 8,5 миллиард АКШ долларды түзгөн ички дүң продукциясынын көрсөткүчүнө караганда, жүргүзүлгөн эсептөөлөр боюнча 2017-жылы Кыргызстанга кредиттик жана гранттык негизинде 9 миллиарддан ашык АКШ доллар каражаты бөлүнгөн (бул сумманын ичинен 2,5 миллиарддан ашык АКШ доллар каражаты грант болуп берилген).[92] Cоветтер Союзу кыйраган мезгилден тарта биринин аркасынан бири келген жетекчилер эл аралык каржы институттар берген салттуу (нео-либералдык) саясий сунуштамаларын колдонуп, пайда көрө ала турган (ээликтен ажыратуу менен мамлекеттик мүлктөрүн менчиктештирүү аркылуу), бирок  натыйжасы жок колу буту байланган саясий оюнчулар басып алган склеротикалык жана баарын көзөмөлдөп турган өкмөттү алмаштырышкан. Мамлекеттик институттардын алсыздыгы саясий партиялык системасынын туруксуздуулугунда билинет, анткени саясий топтоолор дегенде чектелген идеологияга байланган айрым адамдардын тарабынан жетектелген бош бирикмелерди гана түшүнсө болот (идеология тууралуу сөз кылганда, айрымдар улутчулдук, либерализм жана орусчул саясат сыяктуу чоң темаларына тийиш амалдарын колдонгону, же президенттик менен парламенттик системаларынын ортосунда жасалчу тандоо сыяктуу конкреттүү саясат темасын колдонушканы кошо белгиленмекчи). Бирок, учурлардын көбүндө (дээрлик баардыгында) партиялардын алгачкы функциясын соцтармактар менен олигархиялык кызыкчылыктарынын ырастоо механизми катары түшүнүүгө болот.[93] Дайыма кайталанып, калкып чыккан маселе 500 000 баштап 1 миллион долларга чейин параны талап кылган партиялык тизмеде алгачкы орундар болуп келген, себеби бул орундар мыйзамсыз акча табууга жол ачуу менен сот куугунтугунан коргонууну камсыздамак.[94] Күчтүү президенттик системасына кайтып келүүгө байланыштуу бийликтин бекемделиши тууралуу көптөгөн негиздүү кооптор кандай гана болбосун, мурунку парламенттик система күтүлгөн жыйынтыктарды көргөзө албаганы менен ал убакта бийликтеги мыйзам бузгандарга карата чара көрүлбөгөнү айдан ачык көрүнүүдө. Коррупция жана уюшкан кылмыштуулук Жогоруда айтылып, төмөндө берилген макалалар менен Кыргызстан тууралуу башка көптөгөн маалымат репортаждары мамлекет дуушар болгон көптөгөн көйгөйлөрдүн өзөгүндө паракорчулук жатканын белгилешүүдө. Борбордук Азиянын башка аймактарында тамырлап, бутактап кеткен паракорчулукка өбөлгө тузгөн көптөгөн табигый кең байлыктары Кыргызстанда жок болгонуна карабастан, бул маселеге жергиликтүү дэңгээлден баштап элиталарга чейинки бийлик түзүмдөрү белчесинен аралашкан. Кыргызстандын жайгашуусу бул маселенин маанилүү бөлүгү болуп турат. Орусия, Белоруссия, Казакстан, Армения жана Кыргызстан кирген Евразия экономикалык биримдигинин бажы бирикмесине товарлардын ташылып кирүүсүнүн негизги пункту болуп саналат. Бажы зонасына товарлардын ташылып келиши, өзгөчө Кытайлык товарлардын ташылышы (Орусияга жана Казакстанга жолун Кыргызстандагы “Торугарт” өтмөгү аркылуу улап, Кытайдын түндүк-батышында жайгашкан Кашгарда башталган “Түндүк маршруту”) паракорлукка кенен мүмкүнчүлүктөрүн ачып, таасирдүү оюнчулардын бейрасмий монополиялардын түзүүсүнө жол берет. Расмий бажы өткөрүү-пункттарынан өтүү үчүн төлөнүүчү паранын эсебинен мыйзамсыз киреше табылып, мындай формалдуу иштер көңүлгө алынбаган жерде аткезчилик (контрабанда) мүмкунчүлүктөрүнө кенен жол ачылууда. Товарларды чек-арадан өткөрүү менен алектенген транспорт жана логистика жаатында үстөмдүк кылуу үчүн өлкөгө товарларды өткөрүү ыйгарым укуктарын кыянаттык менен колдонулуусу кирешенин мыйзамсыз табуунун дагы бир жолу болуп эсептелет.[95] Бул маселенин экинчи жагы Орусия менен Европага карай өйдөдө белгиленген “Түндүк маршруту” Кыргызстандан өтүп, баңгизат аткезчилигинин өткөрүү пункту болуп, биринчи кезекте Ооганстандан героиндин Таджикистан аркылуу ташылышы жөнүндө кеп болмокчу.[96] Ширин Айтматова өз баяндамасында билдиргендей, Кыргызстандагы көмүскө экономика эбегейсиз көлөмдүү болуп, болжолдуу түрдө келтирилген эң акыркы анын көрсөткүчү Кыргызстандын ички дүң продукциясынын 42% түзгөн.[97] Эл аралык башкаруучулар менен журналисттер баса белгилегендей, каражаттардын мындай мыйзамсыз табуу булагынын эки түрүн көзөмөлдөп, үстөмдүк кылган таасирдүү күчтөр катары Райымбек Матраимов (бажы) менен Камчы Көлбаев (баңгизат) таанымал болушкан. 2013-жылы Түштүктөгү бажы кызматынын жетекчилигине жетээрден мурда, Кыргызстандын түштүк аймагындагы Бажы башкармалыгынын башкаруучусунун орун басары, кийин 2007-жылы жетектөөчүлүккө келип, Матраимов өз жолун бир нече катардагы кызматтарында иштеп баштаган. 2015-жылы Улуттук Бажы кызматынын башчысынын орун басарлыгына жогорулап, ал убакытка чейин мыйзамсыз киреше табуу айыптарын таануу менен “Раим-миллион” деген атка конуп калган.[98] 2017-жылы президенттик мөөнөтү аягына чыгаардан мурда Алмазбек Атамбаев Матраимовду кызматынан кетиргенине карабастан, ал мезгилде парламентте бийликти кармап турган Кыргызстан Социал-Демократтардын партиясында Матраимовдун агасы өзүнө орун камдап койгон. Натыйжада, жогоруда белгиленгендей Матраимовдордун үй-бүлөсү “Мекеним Кыргызстан” саясий партиясын негиздешкен. Орто беделдүү бажы кызматкеринин көрүнүктүү байлыктары менен олуттуу таасири Кыргызстанда кеңири белгилүү болсо да, дал Эркин Европа Радиосу/Эркиндик Радиосу (RFE/RL), Коррупция менен уюшкан кылмыштуулукту баяндоо долбоору (OCCRP) жана бул долбоордун кыргыз мүчөсү Kloop борборунун биргелешкен журналисттик иликтөөлөрү Матраимовду өлкөдөгү саясий дебаттардын чордонуна чыгарган.[99] Алардын репортаждары алгач Дубайда жашаган казакстан жарандыгына ээ болгон этникалык уйгур Хабибула Абдукадырдын Матраимов менен болгон байланышына басым жасаган. Ошондой эле Хабибула Абдукадыр Лондондо, Вашингтондо жана Германияда көлөмдүү мүлктөргө ээлик кылып, тергөө тобунун сөздөрүнө караганда Борбордук Азиядагы жүктөрдүн аткезчилик империясынын борборунда Абдукадырдын тургандыгы ортого чыккан.[100] Айеркен Саймаитинин берген көрсөтмөлөрүнүн негизинде гана жогоруда айтылган иликтөөлөрдү жүргүзүүгө шарт түзүлгөн, анткени Саймаитинин сөздөрүнөн бул көмүскө тармактарынын атынан 5 жыл бою 700 миллион АКШ доллар каражаттарын которуп, которулган акчалардын изин жашыруу менен алектенгенин жана ортомчунун ролун ойногону белгилүү болгон.[101] Көмүскө иштердин бетин ачкан Саймаитинин сөздөрүнөн Матраимовдордун үй-бүлөсүнүн фондуна 2,4 миллион АКШ долларга жакын каражаттардын түшкөнү жана Дубайда кыймылсыз мүлктүн курулушу боюнча болжол менен Матраимов менен Абдукадырдын кызматташтыгы тууралуу маалымат ачыкка чыккан.  Мыйзамсыз иштердин жүзүн ачкан иликтөө жарыяланаардан бираз гана мурун Саймаити буйрук менен өлтүрүлгөн. Бул иликтөө Бишкекте коррупцияга каршы протесттерди козгоп, бул жыйынга өз салымын кошкон Ширин Айтматова  баш болгон “Үмүт 2020” кыймылы иш жүргүзүп баштаган.[102] 2020-жылдын октябрдагы шайлоолордон мурда бул темадагы талкуулоолор кайрадан жанданган, себеби Матраимовдордун “Мекеним Кыргызстан” партиясы алгачкы орунду ээлөөгө күрөшсө, RFE/RL, OCCRP, Bellingcat жана Kloop уюмдарынын репортаждары “Матраимовдун империясы” деген баш сап менен Матраимовдорго көңүлүн кунт койгон.[103] Репортажды даярдагандардын айтканына караганда, Матраимов өз бизнесин курган механизмдери отчеттордо документтештирилген. Бул иликтөөнүн орчундуу бөлүгүнүн жарыяланышына Матраимовдун жубайы, Аманда Тургунова “элитанын” катарына киргендигин сыланкороздук менен жар салып, соцтармактардагы жеке баракачаларына акылга сыйбаган сатып алуулары менен ысырапкорчулугун көрсөтүүсү салым кошкон.[104] Аманда Тургунова тууралуу чыккан репортаж элдин кыжырын ого бетер кайнатып, 4-октябрь шайлоо күнү “Мекеним Кыргызстан” партиясынын жана башка Матраимовчулдардын добуштарды сатып алуу аракеттери отко май куйгандай болуп, натыйжада президент Жээнбеков кызматынан кеткен.[105] Шайлоо өтөөрү менен бийликке Жапаров келгенден кийин эле дароо жаңы бийлик Матраимов боюнча иликтөө иштери жүргүзүлөөрү тууралуу билдирүү жасаган. Ал билдирүүдө Матраимовдор бажы тармагында көмүскө кирешеси мурун айтылган 700 миллион АКШ доллардан ашкан алда канча ири схемаларга тийиштүү экендиги белгиленген.[106] Ошентип, 2 миллиард сомго жакын (23,6 миллион АКШ доллар) жеке пайда көрүп, мамлекетке зыян келтирген деген айыбы тагылып, 20-октябрда Матраимов камакка алынган. Бирок, жогоруда белгиленгендей Жапаров жана ал койгон УКМКнын жаңы төрагасы Камчыбек Ташиев менен биргеликте экономикалык мунапысты жарыялоо менен түзүлүп калган кырдаалдан чыгуу амалын табышкан. Бул демилгеге ылайык, жасалган кылмыш иштери боюнча орчундуу жазадан кутулуу үчүн мурунку жылдарда паракорчулуктан мыйзамсыз жол аркылуу тапкан кирешесинин бөлүгүн кайтаруу мүмкүнчүлүгү сунушталган. Жарыяланган экономикалык мунапыстын жыйынтыгында мамлекеттин казынасына көптөгөн накталай каражаттар түшүп, убадаланган тез “жыйынтыктарды” көрсөтүү менен өтө эле курч жана ыңгайсыз суроолорду берүүдөн баш тартып, кылдаттыкты талап кылып, түзүлүп келе жаткан аярлуу күчтөрдүн бузулушу эч кимге кереги жоктой эле. Матраимов кайтарып берүүгө макул болгон 2 миллиард сомдон (23,6 миллион АКШ доллардан) 600 миллион сомду Бишкек шаардагы 9 батир жана соода борборун мамлекетке жаздыруу менен кутулган. Акырында, күнөөсүн өз мойнуна алып, (23,6 миллион АКШ долларга кошумча) 3000 АКШ доллар айып пулун төлөөгө макул болуп, Матраимовго карата 2020-жылдын февраль айынан тарта мамлекеттик кызматтарда иштөөгө үч жылдык тыюу салынган.[107] Бул кадамы элдин жүзүнө түкүрүк катары кабыл алынып, коомдо пайда болгон резонанс нааразылык акцияларын кайрадан жанданткан.[108] Бул жыйын жазылып жаткан учурда күтүлбөгөн бурулуу болуп Матраимовдун кайрадан УКМК тарабынан камалышы болду, анткени мындан бир жума мурун эле  анын акчалардын изин жашыруу иштери боюнча тагылган айыптары сотто каралып, эки айга алдын ала абакка киргизүү чечими кабыл алынган.[109] Кыргызстандагы мыйзамдар менен маселелери бар болгонуна карабастан, Матраимов жана анын жубайы 2020-жылдын декабрь айынан баштап паракорчулукка шектелүүнүн негизинде АКШнын Магнитский санкцияларынын тизмесине киргизилишкен.[110] “Камчы” коюлган аты менен таанылган Камчыбек Кольбаев кыргыз саясатына таасирин көп деле тийгизбегени менен 2011-жылдагы АКШда кабыл алынган “Чет өлкөлүк баңгибарондор” тууралуу мыйзам боюнча “олуттуу чет өлкөлүк баңги соодагер” катары таанылып, 2012-жылдын февраль айынан бери АКШнын Каржы министрилиги тарабынан Кольбаевдин бардык финансалык эсептери тоңдурулган.[111] Жыйынтыгында, 2012-жылдын декабрь айында Кольбаев Бириккен Араб Эмираттарынан кайра Кыргызстанга экстрадицияланып, абакка 5 жарым жылга камалып, кийин ал мөөнөтү 3 жылга кыскартылып, 2014-жылы май айында акыры абактагы мөөнөтү аягына чыкты деген корутундунун негизинде эркиндикке чыккан. Уюшкан кылмыш топторун жетектеген деген айыптары дагы алынган.[112] Эркин Европа Радиосу/Эркиндик Радиосу (RFE/RL), Коррупция менен уюшкан кылмыштуулукту баяндоо долбоору (OCCRP), Kloop борборунун жана Bellingcat уюмунун биргелишкен Матраимовдорго карата журналисттик иликтөөлөрү Кольбаев менен Матраимовдун ортосунда байланыштары бар экендигин аныктап, Матраимовдун үй-бүлөсү болжол менен Кольбаевге таандык болгон Ыссык-Көлдөгү вилласында токтошкону белгиленди.[113] Жапаров менен Ташиевдин ашыкча жарнамаланган коррупцияга каршы кампаниясынын алкагында 2020-жылдын октябрь айында Кольбаев кайра камакка алынган, бирок ага карата чаралардын көрүлүшү белгисиз.[114] Аксана Исмаилбекова өз эссесинде белгилегендей, мындай ири оюнчулар түптөлүп, тамырларын терең кетирген паракорчулук маданиятынын эң жогорку дэңгээлинде отуруп, бул маданият кылмыштуу таптар менен мамлекеттин бүтүндөй ишмердүулүгүнө сиңип калган. Ишкерлер мамлекет менен кылмыш топтордун аралашма симбиотикалык кызматташуусуна мажбур болуп, жергиликтүү дэңгээлден баштап улуттук дэңгээлге чейин пара берүү менен (расмий жана бей расмий) коргоонууга жана экономикалык мүмкүнчүлүктөргө ээ болууда. Кольбаев менен Матраимов сыяктуу чоң фигуралардан баштап жергиликтүү саясатчыларга чейин өздөрүнүн жеке жактоочу жана кардарлык тармактарына ээ. Мамлекет ийгиликке жете албай калган учурларда анын ордуна ишке киришүүгө даяр болгон социалдык камсыздандыруунун өз схемаларын ири оюнчулар натыйжалуу түрдө иштетишет. Мисалы, социалдык программаларды жүргүзүп жана Оштогу университке барып, окуганга студенттерди колдогон Матраимовдун үй-бүлөсүнүн фондунун Кара-Суу аймагында таасири кыйла эле жогору.[115] Эрика Марат белгилегендей, пандемия учурунда мамлекет өз милдеттерин аткара албай калганда өзү чыккан Ыссык-Көл районуна Кольбаев колдоо катары керектелген дары-дармектер менен башка керектелген жабдуулардын жеткирилишин камсыздаган.[116] Жергиликтүү дэңгээлде болсо, өзгөчө Ош жана анын тегерек аймактарында жайгашкан спорттук клубдар менен машыгуучу залдар каржылай турган конкреттүү бир жактоочунун атынан иш жүргүзчүдөй жергиликтүү күчтөр (спортсмендер) менен камсыздоосун улантууда. Бул жигиттер саясий партиялардын атынан шайлоолордо байкоочу болуп берип, ошо жактагы участоктордо аларды каржылап турган кишинин саясий партиясынын атынан добуштарды сатып алуу схемаларын башкарууда пайдаларын көрсөтүшөт. Жогоруда айтылгандай, ар бир келген президент кабинетте ээлеген бийликти жеке чөнтөгүн мүмкүн болушунча толтуруу максатында колдонушкан. 2016-жылы Карнеги фондунан Сара Чейз жүргүзгөн изилдөөсү президенттин (ал убакытта Атамбаев болуп  турган учур) өлкөдө башка клептократтык тармактардын үстүнөн болгон үстөмдүгүн аныктап, ал үстөмдүгү укук коргоо органдар менен соттор президентке баш ийгенинен байкалган.[117] Мындай үмүтсүз абалга дуушар болгондо, Батыш колдогон паракорчулукка каршы күрөшүүгө багытталган институционалдык реформанын жүргүзүү аракеттери болгон күчү менен элден колдоо табууга умтулган. Кыргызстан учурда ачык-айкындуулукту жогорулатуу максатында өкмөттөр менен иштешкен глобалдуу уюмга, “Ачык өкмөт” өнөктөштүгүнүнө мүчө болуп турат. Бирок, кээ бир министриликтерде маалыматтын жеткиликтүүлүгүндө болгон чектелген прогресс менен Жээнбеков маалында киргизилген пайдалуу, бирок жетиштүү түрдө колдонулбаган электрондук сатып алуу системасына карабастан, өкмөт маанилүү реформалардын ордуна эл аралык донорлор колдогон реформа боюнча өкмөт долбоорлоруна жана схемага болгон мүчөлүктүн пиар пайдаларына кобүрөөк маани берген.[118] Аксана Исмаилбекова билдиргендей, президент Жапаров «доля» (мамлекеттик мекемелерге бизнестен түшкөн пайданын бир “бөлүгүн берүү”) аттуу системасын жокко чыгарууга убада берип, өйдөдө айтылгандай октябрда бийликке жаңы өкмөттүн келишинен кийин экономикалык мунапыстын натыйжасында каражаттардын бир бөлүгү жеңил опузалоо түрүндө кайтарылган. Кайра эле Исмаилбекованын сөздөрүнө кайрылсак, Жапаровдун паракорчулук боюнча чараларды көрөөрүнө ишенип, аны колдогондордун арасында кээ бирлердин чындап колдогонун себеби мамлекеттеги коррупцияны толугу менен жоё алат дегендиктен эмес. Бишкектин сырткы кээ бир аймактарындагы эл Жапаровду экономикалык популист катары таанып, мурунку кесиптештерине караганда коррупциянын кыжырды кайнаткан учурларына каршы чараларды көрүп, коомчулуктун кызыкчылыктарын эске алуу менен тамырлап кеткен коррупциянын процесстерин кылдаттык менен башкараар деген ой түзүлүп калгандай. Дал ушул контекстте, жөнөкөй жараандардын жашоосун бузган уюшкан кылмыштуулуктун аракеттерине жана жергиликтүү аткаминерлер менен милиционерлердин майда паракорчулукка каршы көрүнүктүү кадамдары чындап жасалса, анда казынага чектелген каражаттардын кайтарылышы менен мунапыстын алкагында колдун чабылышы Жапаровдун колдоосуна өтө эле терс таасирин тийгизбөөгө тийиш. Эгерде Жапаровдун ишмердүүлүгү жогоруда белгиленген нукта кеткен болгондо, бийликтин тузүмдөрүн бекемдеп, жабык эшиктердин аркасында жүргүзүлгөн эбегейсиз чоң коррупцияга өбөлгө түзүлмөк (мындай иш-аракеттери социалдык тармактарга чыгып таркалып кетпөөнүн шартында гана). Башкаруунун мындай жолуна мисал болуп жакын арада эле уюшкан кылмыштуулктун болжолдуу “көзүрү” Кадырбек Досоновдун камалышын айтууга болот. Анын ири мүлктөрү камерага тартылып, Улуттук коопсуздук боюнча мамлекеттик комитети тарабынан ачыкка жарыяланган.[119] Улутчулдук, салттар, укуктар жана динКоррупциянын өсүүсү менен биргеликте улутчулдук жана ага байланыштуу популисттик, социо-консервативдик жана салттуу кыймылдар кыргыз саясатынын эволюциясынын башкы факторлору болуп саналууда. Советтер Союзунун кыйроо убагында жана андан кийин Кыргызстан жараны болууну түшүнүү процесси ортого чыга баштаган. Кыргыздар өз алдынча этникалык топ болуп жашаганы менен Кыргызстан мамлекети Советтер жана Орусия империяларына толугу менен сиңгенден кийин гана түзулгөн. Ошол мезгилде алгач айтканда Кыргызстандын түштүгүндө жайгашкан өзбектердин жамааты менен империялык жана советтик доордо көчүп келген орустар сыяктуу Кыргызстандын жеринде көптөгөн этникалык улуттар жашашкан.[120] Президент Акаевдин “Кыргызстан биздин жалпы үйүбүз” аттуу демилгесин жүзөгө ашырып баштаганына карбастан, ал жана андан кийинки саясатчылар өз саясий максаттарын көздөп кыргыз этникалык улутчулдугун түзүп, өнүктүрүүгө жана аны башкарууга умтулушат.[121] (Кыргызстандын түштүк бөлүгүндө мамлекеттик түзүмдөрүндө көпчүлүктү тузгөн) Этникалык кыргыздар менен (төмөндө белгиленген окуяларга чейинки түштүктөгү экономиканын жеке секторунда көпчүлүктү тузгөн) этникалык өзбектердин ортосунда чыңалуу Ошто жана анын тегерек четинде эки ири баш аламандык менен аяктаган. Биринчиси 1990-жылы болсо (колхоздогу бийликтин талаш-тартышынын жыйынтыгында 300 ашуун  киши каза табышкан), экинчиси 2010-жылы (бул окуяда курмандыкка чалынгандардын саны эмдигиче такталбай турат, бирок болжол менен 426 киши көз жумгандыгын белгилеген отчетту жергиликтүү серепчилерден турган Улуттук комиссиясы жарыялап, бул маалымат эл аралык серепчилер тарабынан сынга алынып, чыныгы саны бир нече миңдин тегерегинде болгонун кошумчалашкан).[122] 2010-жылы зомбулуктун айынан чыккан чыр-чатак президент Бакиевдин бийлиги кулатылгандан кийин от алып кеткен. Өлкөнүн саясий келечеги боюнча кеңири таралган талаш-тартыштар өзбектер өкмөттун чөйрөсүндө көпчүлүк добушка ээ болуусун талап койгонуна алып келсе, өз кезекте этникалык кыргыздар жер реформасын жүргүзүүгө кайрадан чакырып, кедей жарандарга жерлерин бөлүштүрүп берүү үчүн өзбекетрди өлкөдөн кууп чыгуу чакырыктары дагы кээ бир учурларда орун алган.[123] Чыңалуу апрель менен июнь айларынын ичинде өрчүп, Жалал-Абадда туу чокусуна жеткен баш аламандыкка айланып, 9 жана 10 июнда Ош шаарында жаңжалдын оту өзгөчө жагылган. Баш аламандыктардан кийин, президент Роза Отунбаева Борбордук Азия боюнча ЕККУнун Парламенттик Ассамблеясынын атайын өкүлүн, Киммо Килджуненди жетекчиликке чакыргандан кийин,  жергиликтүү иликтөөгө кошумчаланып Кыргызстан түштүгүндөгү окуяларды иликтөө боюнча көз-карандысыз эл аралык Комиссиясы түзүлгөн.[124] Жаңы тузүлгөн Комиссиянын маалыматына караганда каза болгондордун жана жаракат алгандардын жалпы саны 470 барабар болуп (көбүнчөсү этникалык өзбектер болгон), бирок андан дагы артышы мүмкүндүгү белгиленип, 111 миң кыргызстандык өзбектер Өзбекстанга көчүрүлүп, дагы 300 миңге жакын өзбектер Кыргызстан боюнча ар жакка жеткирилген. Бирок, Кыргызстан өкмөтү өзбекчил деген шектин негизинде бул Комиссиянын жыйынтыктарын четке кагып, Кильджуненди персона нон-грата кылып жарыялаган. Эрик МакГлинчи өз эссесинде өкүнүү менен эстегендей, “2010-жылдагы этникалык зомбулук тууралуу пикирлерин билдирген (Ош шаарынын мурунку мэри) Мырзакматовдун, же башка бир кыргыз улутчулунун бир тараптуу баяндамасына бир дагы кыргыз лидери каршы чыгууга аракет жасаган жок. Бул баяндамага каршы чыгуу өзүнө саясий кол салууга барабар эле. Демек, 2010-жылдагы баш аламандыктардан кийин этникалык өзбектерге карата кыргыз сот системасынын тарабынан жасалган одоно сот катасын оңдоого аткаруу бийлигинин эч кимиси аракет кылбаганы таң калаарлык эмес”. 2010-жылдагы каргашалуу окуялардан кийинки жылдардын ичинде этникалык кыргыздардын жамааты түштүктүн жергиликтүү экономикасында өз ролун керек болушунча кеңейткен. Исмаилбекованын ишинде белгиленгендей, зомбулуктун андан нары өрчүп, жалындап кетпеши жана саясий кысымга алынбаш үчүн өзбек калкы өзүн коргоо тактикасын колдонууга мажбур болгон. Мындай тактика шайлоолордун божомолдуу жеңүүчүлөрүн колдоо менен өзбек жамаатынын орчундуу бөлүгү Орусияга жана Өзбекстанга миграцияга кеткенин камтыган. Өсүп жаткан улутчулдуктун фонунда кыргыздарга да, өзбектерге да бир дэңгээлде кыргыз жарандык (этникалык эмес) идентүүлүк демилгесин алдыга сүйрөп чыгаруу аракеттери оңунан чыкпай калган. Басылманын башында белгиленгендей, акыркы он жылдык убакытта өсүп жаткан кыргыз улутчулдук маанайы жергиликтүү өзбек азчылыгына багытталбастан, ар кандай талаш-тартышты туудурган батыш баалуулуктарына каршы пикирлерде, (жогоруда айтылгандай) Кытайдын өсүп жаткан таасири боюнча коркунучтарда жана кыргыз тилин илгерилетүүдө билинген. Тил маселеси кыргыз иденттүүлүгү боюнча талаш-тартыштардын талаасын кеңейтип, шаардыктар менен айылдыктардын ортосунда чоң өксүк менен коштолуп келет, анткени Бишкекте билим алгандар кыргыз тилинин ордуна орус тилине басымдуулук жасаса, айыл жергесинде окуп, чоңойгондор жалаң кыргыз тилинде сүйлөп, орус тилин окуп, колдонууга шарт түзүлбөй, кээ бир учурларда такыр эле жокко тете.[125] Ошентип, кыргыз тил жана адабиятынын илгерилеши улуттук саясаттын долбоорунун бир бөлүгү гана болбостон, ошондой эле таптык жана аймактык бөлүнүүсүнө негиз болуп, бул учурда кыргыз тилдүүлөр кээ бир орус тилдүү райондордо эмдигиче “артта калган” деп эсептелүүдө. Учурдагы Конституция боюнча кыргыз тили “мамлекеттик тилдин” милдетин аткарса, орус тили дагы деле “расмий тилдин” статусуна ээ. Баш мыйзамдын жаңы долбоорунда орус тилин “расмий статусунан” ажыратуу боюнча бир нече сунуштары тушкөн, бирок бул жасалган аракетке Москва көңүлүн буруп баштаганы негизги себеп болбосо да, 2021-жылдын февраль айында жарыяланган Баш мыйзамдын долбооруна мындай өзгөртүүнүн киргизилишине тоскоолдуктар жаралган.[126] “Батыш баалуулуктарына” өсүп жаткан терсаяктык акыркы жылдардын ичинде кыргыз улутчулдугунун эң күчтүү кыймылдаткычы болушу ыктымал. Көптөгөн башка мамлекеттер сымал,  улутчулдук көбүнчө ЛГБТ жана аялдардын укуктарын коргоо маселесине келип такалып, орусчул пропагандасы менен кээ бир жерлерде шайкеш келип, “салттуу” кыргыз баалуулуктар менен улуттук иденттүүлүк тууралуу жаңы пайда болуп келе жаткан талаш-тартыштарда улутчулдукутн түп-тамыры жергиликтүү мүнөздө экени айдан ачык көрүнүүдө.[127] Кыздарды уурдоо (ала-качуу), күйөөсүнүн үйүндө ата-энесине кызмат кылууга мажбурланып, келиндерге карата жасалган орой мамиле, үй-бүлөдөгү зомбулук сыяктуу көйгөйлөрдү чечүү боюнча жасалган эл аралык аракеттери улутчулдуктун таасиринин алдында каралып, салттуу кыргыз эрдиктин жана үй-бүлөнү патриархалдык көз-караш менен куруу концепциялары тыгыз байланышта болууда.[128] 2011-жылдан баштап үй-бүлөлүк зордук-зомбулуктун катталган саны 400%га өстү.[129] Мамлекетте жек көрүүнү козутууга же басмырлоого каршы чараларды көргөн орчундуу мыйзам жок болуп, жергиликтүү практикада болсо учурдагы Конституциянын 16-беренеси колдонулат.[130] “Салттуу” гендердик милдеттерине күчтүү социалдык басым жасалганына карабастан, башка Борбордук Азиянын мамлекеттерине салыштырмалуу Кыргызстандагы саясий табында аялдарга көбүрөөк маани берилип, партиялык тизмелерде 30%дык гендердик квота бөлүнүп, Жогорку Кеңештин учурдагы чакырылышында (2015-2020) 23 аял депутаттык кызматында иштеп келүүдө.[131] Жогоруда айтылгандай, 2000-жылдарда Отунбаева алдыңкы саясий фигура болуп, президенттин милдеттерин дагы аткарган. Ал эми Жапаровдун 16 кишиден турган өкмөтүндө, болгону экөөсү гана аялдар, алар – юстиция министри Асель Чинбаева менен транспорт, архитектура, курулуш жана коммуникациялар министри Гульмира Абдралиева. “Labrys” (Лабрис) сыяктуу бейөкмөт уюмдардын колдоосу менен жана 2019-жылы аялдардын эл аралык күнүндө түстүү желектерди көтөрүп, “баардыгы үчүн тең-укуктуулук” деген талаптарын коюу менен ЛГБТ коомчулугунун укутарын коргоо боюнча чектелген аракеттердин жасалышына Жылдыз Мусабекова сыяктуу депуттатар жана улутчул топтордун тарабынан олуттуу саясий реакция көрсөтүлгөн.[132] Ал фэйсбук баракчасына төмөнкүдөй сөздөрдү жазып чыккан: “чай куйгусу келбеген кыздарга жана балалуу болгону ниеттенбеген эркектерге ... каргышка калганы аздык кылат, андайларды ур-токмокко алыш керек... Алардын башынан ушул сыяктуу жиндиликти уруп чыгарыш керек, жакшынакай жигиттер [бул ишти жасоого даяр болгондор] барбы?”, кийин дагы кошумчалап жазган “эгерде биз унчукпай отура берсек...Кыргызстан “Гейстанга” айланып калат”. Коомдун кеңири катмарында мындай мамиле көнүмүш адатка айланып, кичи ЛГБТ коомчулуктун мүчөлөрүнө карата зомбулук кеңири кездешүүдө. Ошондуктан, ЛГБТ коомчулугу чогулуп турган “Лондон” деген коомдук клубу 2017-жылы жабылып, ачык бири бири менен жолугуша албай калышкан.[133] ЛГБТ коомчулугунун мүчөлөрүн зордуктагандарга карата милиция эч кандай чара көрбөгөнү белгилүү, анткени алар тескерисинче зордукталып калгандардын ата-энелерине алардын “жеке жашоосун” билдирбөө үчүн алардан акча талап кылгандары чындап эле көп кездешет. Баш мыйзамдын учурдагы жана каралып чыккан долбоорунда нике аял менен эркектин ортосунда гана кыйылып, 2016-жылы референдумга коюлган Баш мыйзамдын долбоорунда жубайлардын үйлөнүшү бир жыныстык никелерге тыюу салуу мүмкүнчүлүгү катары кабыл алынган.[134] World Values изилдөө борборунун 2017 – 19 жылдарда  жүргүзгөн изилдөөсүнө караганда, кыргызстандыктардын 73% гомосексуал коңшулардын жанында жашаганды каалабагандыгын билдирсе, 83% мындай катнаштарды туура эмес деп көрсөтүшкөн (бир гана 1,3% гомосексуалдык мамилелерди нормалдуу эсептеген).[135] Мааданияттын салттуу көз-караштары элдин аң-сезимине терең сиңип калгандыктан, ЛГБТ коомчулугунун укуктарын коргоо боюнча иш-аракеттери бейөкмөт уюмдар менен эл аралык коомчулук үчүн өтө эле татаалдашып, элди дүрбөтүү максатында иш алып барган, коомдук тартиптин сакталышын көзөмөлдөгөн “Кырк Чоро” сыяктуу улутчулдук уюмдун жеңил олжосуна айланып калган.[136] Кыргызстандагы социалдык-консервативдүүлүктүн ири бөлүгү салттуу жана улутчул маанайда түп-тамырланса, бул мамилелер өсүп жаткан диний көз-караштарга мындан да бекем байлана баштап, Борбордук Азиянын башка аймактарына караганда бул көрүнүш ачык-айкын көрүнүп турган.  Борбордук Азиянын башка жергесиндей эле, советтер доорунда диний маселелер Борбор Азиядагы мусулмандардын Руханий Башкармалыгы тарабынан катуу көзөмөлгө алынып, бул уюм өз ишин кийин Кыргызстандагы мусулмандардын Руханий Башкармалыгы катары уланткан. Расмий диний жамаатынын үстүнөн көзөмөл өйдөдө турган уюмдан болуп жатканына карабастан, Ислам дининин маңызы кеңири Мусулмандык Умма менен болгон катнаштарды кеңейтүү аркылуу ачылып, араб, пакистан жана түрк фонддорунун каражаттары бир гана мечиттердин курулушуна гана жумшалбастан (мечиттердин саны 1990-жылы 39 болсо, 2019-жылына 2600гө чейин өскөн) сууга жеткиликтүүлүктү камсыздоо менен мектептерди куруу сыяктуу диний социалдык долбоорлорго дагы көңүл бурулуп, Ислам диндин өнүгүүсүнө  өбөлгө түзүлгөн.[137] Натыйжада, түшкү маалдагы намаз окуу, үй-бүлө жана салттардын түшүнүктөрүндө негизделген ислам иденттүүлүгүнүн маданияттуу формасынан бул динди катуу кармоо түрүнө өтүү иши башталып келе жатат. Борбордук Азиянын аймагында Кыргызстанда хиджаб ачык-айкын кийилет, бирок бүткүл жерде мектептерде атайын формалардын киргизилгенине карабастан, хиджабды мектепте кийүүгө салынган тыюу де-факто эмдигиче сакталып келүүдө.[138] “Аггрессивдүү прозелитизацияга(бирөөнү кандайдыр бир динге жыгылтуу)” каршы иштелип чыккан эрежелер иш-жүзүндө чындап Кыргыз Республикасынын Дин иштери боюнча мамлекеттик комиссиясында расмий түрдө катталбаган мусулман азчылыктар менен протестанттардын топторуна гана карата колдонулган.[139] 2020/21 жылдардын Баш мыйзам долбоору каралып жаткан учурда, мамлекет “светтик” болуу талабын (1-берене) жокко чыгаруунун кереги бары жогу тууралуу сөз жүрүп, диний коомчулуктун өзгөрүшүнө басым жасалып, коомдук аң-сезимде секуляризмдин советтик үлгүдөгү атеизм менен болжолдуу аралашмасы талкууланган.[140] Жыйынтыгында, 2021-жылдын февраль айында жарыяланган Конституциянын долбоорунда мамлекетти “светтик” катары мүнөздөгөн 1-беренеси ордунда калган. Ошентип, улутчулдук менен социалдык консервантизм бара бара күчтөнүп, коомдук либералдык кыймылдарына жасалган басым артып жатты. Кыргыз президенттеринин көпчүлүгү кандайдыр бир дэңгээлде улутчулдук негиздүү шайлоолорду көздөсө, Жапаровдун саясий мүнөзүн популисттик улутчул деп аныктоого мүмкүн. Бирок, социалдык консерватизмдин стандарттуу аныктамаларына карабастан, Жапаровдун саясий көз-карашы экономикалык улутчулдукка байланыштуу болуп, анын негизинде антиэлитардык популизм менен “Кумтөр” кең булагын мамлекеттештирүү боюнча кампаниясынын алкагында жасалган иш-аракеттери жатканы көрүнүүдө. Экономикалык туруксуздуктун шартында эл аралык инвесторлордун (синофобия көрүнуштөрүнүн пайда болгонуна көңүл салып байкап отурган кытайлык инвесторлордун дагы) басымынан улам мамлекеттештирүү маселесине кайтууга мажбур болгонун эске алуу менен популисттик мүнөздүү президент аппараты өз жинин ЛГБТ коомчулугунун жана аялдардын укуктары маселесинен, же бул маселелердин үстүнөн иштеген либералдык жана батышчыл бейөкмөт уюмдарынан чыгаруу ыктымалдыгы жогорулоодо. Жарандык коом Жогоруда жана төмөндө белгиленип кеткен маселелерге карабастан, азыркы маалда Кыргызстан жарандык коомдун ишмердүүлүгүнүн аймактык борбору болуп, мындай абал Кыргызыстандык да, калган Борбордук Азиянын аймактарындагы уюмдар үчүн да тең түзүлгөн. Андай болсо да, акыркы жылдары Кыгызстандагы жарандык коом токтобой кысымга алынганы байкалууда. Башка аймактарда бул жаатта начар болуп турган кырдаал эл аралык байкоочулардын Кыргызстан тушугуп жаткан көйгөйлөрүн терең түшүнүүсүнө жолтоо болушу ыктымал. Жергиликтүү бейөкмөт уюмдар 2000-жылдары күчтүү позицияларга ээ болуп, анын мурунку ишкерлери 2005 жана 2010-жылдардагы митингдерге жана алардын кийинки окуяларга активдүү катышкан деп саналып, жада калса өлкөдөгү өзгөрүүлөрдөн пайда көрүп, алар үчүн күрөшкөн саясатчылардын дагы ишинде тыныгуу алышына себепкер болгон. 2011-жылы өкмөткө караганда, бейөкмөт уюмдарга болгон элдин ишеними алда канча жогору болгон, мисалы – сурамжылоого  катышкандардын 77% бейөкмөт уюмдар социалдык өнүгүүнү аркалап, иштеп жатышат десе, 62% мамлекет дал ошол максатты көздөп иш алып барганына күмөн санашкан.[141] Бирок, акыркы он жылдын ичинде бейөкмөт уюмдар үзгүлтүксүз басымга жана мыйзамсыздаштыруу кампаниясына кабылып, Эрнест Жанаевдин ишинде бул көрүнүштүн өсүүсү 2014-жылдан тарта байкалып, белгиленген. Мурун документтерде бекитилгендей, жарандык коом аларга карата бюрократиялык жүгүн оорлоштуруу боюнча бир нече аракеттерге дууушар болгон. Ал аракеттеринин бири 2016-жылдагы чет өлкөлүк агенттерге тиешелүү кабыл алынган орусиялык мыйзамды кайталоо болсо, экинчиси 2019 – 2020-жылдары киреше боюнча деталдуу отчет берүүнүн олуттуу жаңы талаптарын киргизип, убактылуу кызматчылардын кабыл алынуусуна тоскоол жаратуу болгон.[142] Жергиликтүү бейөкмөт уюмдардын активисттери коопсуздук кызматтардын тарабынан күчөп жаткан басым тууралуу кабар берип, алар коопсуздук кызматкерлер тарабынан суракка чакырылып, расмий түрдө да, белгисиз адамдардын жардамы менен да активисттердин аркасынан аңдуу жүргүзүлүүдө. Мындай негизсиз басымга карабастан, жарандык коомдун көптөгөн активисттери калктын адам укуктарынын бузулушунан кабардар болгондугун жогорулатуу боюнча өтө маанилүү ишин аткарууга үлгүрүп, эң азынан азыркы убакытка чейин орун алган системадагы элдин жинин кайнаткан учурларын жөнгө сала алган басымды кайтарып жасай алышты десе болот. Жогоруда айтылгандай түз иш аракеттер жашыруун топтор менен улутчулдук топтор тарабынан мыйзамсыздаштыруунун үзгүлтүксүз аракеттери мындан да кеңири жайылган контексттин алкагында жүзөгө ашууда. Бул аракеттери көрүнүктүү массалык маалымат каражаттарынын колдонулушу жана соцтармактарда түбү белгисиз болгон кампаниялар менен коштолуп, активисттерде бул иштерге атайын кызматтардын (кыргыздардын жана кээ бирөөлөрдүн айтымы боюнча орустардын дагы) тиешеси бар деген шектерди туудурууда. Жергиликтүү көйгөйлөрдүн отун жагып, козгогон бейөкмөт уюмдарга каршы баяндамаларды аймактарда таркатуу иштеринде Орусия кандайдыр бир деңгээлде аралашканы күмөнсүз. Жогоруда белгиленип кеткендей, активисттер салттуу көз-караштар сиңип калган коомду аралаштырууда көптөгөн кыйынчылыктар менен алпурушуп, аялдардын жана ЛГБТ коомчулугунун укуктарын коргоо маселесин чечүү менен алектенген бейөкмөт уюмдар алардын кызыкчылыктары жергиликтүү калктын кызыкчылыктарына дал келбестен батышчыл болуп жатканын баса белгилеген оппоненттердин куралына айланып калышкан. Мындай кырдаал бейөкмөт уюмдарга “грант жегичтер” деген экинчи айыпты тагып, бейөкмөт уюмдар жергиликтүү калктын маселелерин биринчи кезекке койбостон, ар кандай максатта донорлук каражаттарды топтоого гана кызыкдар кишилер катары кабылдоосун мындан дагы жогорулатат. Ошондой баяндоолордун жыйынтыгында ачык-айкын отчетторуна болгон талаптарга ого бетер басым жасалат. Кыргыз Республикасынын Жогорку Кеңеши жакын арада эле “Кесиптик бирликтер жөнүндө” мыйзам долбоорун кайрадан карап, бардык аймактык жана тармактык профсоюздарды Кыргызстандын профсоюздар федерациясына кирүүсүн мажбурлоо аркылуу профсоюздук ишмердүүлүк үстүнөн көзөмөлдү күчөтүүгө багытталган. Ошентип, Кыргызстандын профсоюздар федерациясы Өкмөт тааныган жалгыз жалпы мамлекеттик профсоюздук органдын статусуна ээ болмокчу.[143] Бул кадам Федерациядагы көзөмөлгө болгон саясий негизделген күрөш менен уланып, саясий байланыштарга чөмүлгөн мурунку баш катчы кызматынан бошотулуп, калган профсоюздагы аткаминерлер менен активисттер өкмөт тарабынан куугунтук кампаниясына кабылган. Адам Укуктарын Байкоо уюмунун (Human Rights Watch) жана Борбордук Азиядагы Эмгек Укуктарын көзөмөлдөгөн Миссиянын мааалыматына таянуу менен аларга карата 50гө жакын кылмыш иштери козголгон. 2020-жылдын аягында жаңы төрагасын шайлоо максатында жыл сайын өткөрүлүүчү конгрессинин өткөрүүсүнө тыюу салынган.[144] Кыргызстандагы жарандык коомго багытталган акылга сыйбаган күнөөлөөлөрдүн агымында эл аралык коомчулук коргонуу позициясын алууга умтулуп, толгон-токой айыптардан качуу менен өз ишин аткарууга аракеттенип, саясатчылар жасап жаткан терс кылыктары менен күрөшүүдө дипломатиялык басымды колдонушкан.  Акыркы 15 жылдын ичинде үчүнчү төңкөрүш болгондон кийин саясий кысымга каршылык көрсөтүлүшү туура болуп, бир гана ал күрөштү улантуу зарылчылыгы ортого чыкпастан, стратегияны кайрадан ойлонуп чыгууга дагы убакыт келгендей. Эссенин көптөгөн авторлору учурдагы түзүлүп калган шарттарда донорлордун приоритеттерин жана ишмердүүлүгүн өнүктүрүүнүн жолдору тууралуу өз пикирлерин жана идеяларын бул жыйында сунушташкан. Асель Доолоткелдиева чектелген таасирдин факторун эске алуу менен саясий чөйрөдө жарандык коомдун тийгизген таасиринин тереңдигин кайрадан карап чыгууга болгон муктаждык тууралуу мурун эле сөз көтөргөн. Акыркы окуялардын контекстинде, ошол чектелген таасирдин тийгизгендиги бир нече “эр жүрөк активисттер” жетишсиз деп айтуу менен жакынкы келечекте көңүлдү демократизациянын ордуна экономикалык теңдүүлүк долбоолоруна көбүрөөк бурууга чакырыктарда билинүүдө.[145] Бул жыйынга кошулган Доолоткелдиеванын эмгегинде иштөөнүн жаңы ыкмаларын сунуштоо менен жогоруда белгиленген темасы кеңири ачылууда.  Өз докладында Ширин Айтматова Кыргызстандагы бейөкмөт уюмдардын тармагы өзгөртүлөөргө муктаж болгондугун түздөн-түз белгилеп, жаңы үндөрдү, жаңыча ой-жүгүртүүнү жана каржылоонун механизмдерин жаңыча иштетүүнүн жолдоруна шарт түзүү позициясын коргогон. Көптөн бери созулуп келген жергиликтүү деңгээлдеги отчеттордун маселелерин чечүү үчүн кийинки кадамдардын жасалышы керектелип, жада калса кээ бир донорлор өз өнөктөштөрүнүн жергиликтүү көйгөйлөргө ийкемдүү чара көрүү менен стратегиялык приоритеттери үчүн мейкиндикти камсыз кылууга мажбур болушат.[146] Буга кошумча болуп, жаңы пайда болуп келе жаткан активисттердин топтору менен баарлашуунун эң ыңгайлуу жолдорун табуунун үстүнөн ой-жүгүртүү керектелеттир. Мындай активисттердин топторуна таажы вирусунун маалында жардамын көрсөткөн ыктыярчыларды, болжолдуу төңкөрүштөн бизнести коргоп, сактап калган кошуундардын мүчөлөрү жана сунушталып жаткан Баш мыйзамдын жаңы долбоорунун кээ бир бөлүктөрүнө каршы кампанияларды уюштурган протесттик “Баштан Башта” аттуу активисттердин бирикмелерин киргизсек болот. Бирок, булардан да сырткары бар болгон инститтутардын ордуна көбүнчө соцтармактар аркылуу уюшуп, башкарылган жаңы социалдык кыймылдары пайда болуп, жарандык жана социалдык активизмге болгон ачкалыгын туруктуу түрдө көрсөтүүдө.[147] ММК жана интернеттеги эркиндикБорбордук Азиянын башка малекеттерге караганда Кыргызстандагы массалык маалымат каражаттары жана интернет талаалары салыштырмалуу эркиндикке ээ болгону менен терең түзүлүштүк маселелерге кезиккенде, алар билинбей калууда. Аудиториянын ири бөлүгүн мамлекеттик телевидениелер өздөрүнө тартканын улантып, алардын артынан орусиялык каналдар элдин назарына ээ болуп, айыл жергесинде жаңылыктардын жана көңүл ачуунун негизиги булагы дагы деле телевидениелер эсептелет. Ал эми шаардыктардын арасында интернет кеңири таралганына байланыштуу салттуу массалык маалымат каражаттарынан ашып онлайн-каналдар популярдуулугун арттырууда. ММК сектору чалдыккан эң ири маселелердин бири дүйнөлүк журналистика кезиккен маселелердин жергиликтүү өрнөгү болуп, жергиликтүү экономиканын алсыздыгынын жана үстөмдүгү өсүп жаткан онлайн-жарнамалардын (жана алардын соцтармактар менен издөө провайдерлерди каптап кетүүсү) фонунда көз карандысыз массалык маалымат каражаттары пайда көрө баштаган. ММКны каржылоо жана анын менчик маселелери цензуранын жана журналисттик өзүн-өзү цензурага салуунун негизин түзүшөт. Көптөгөн басмаканалардын макалалар жана редакторлук көз-караштары аларды каржылай турган адамдардан көз-каранды болгон “жүргүзгөн оюн үчүн акча төлө” деген саясатын карманганы ММКнын татаал экономикасын ого бетер оорлоштуруп жатат.[148] Кыргызстан үчүн мындай кырдаал уникалдуу болбосо да, анын таасири көптөгөн тармактарда билинүүдө, мисалы саясий элиталар менен жергиликтүү ишкерлердин тарабынан окуялардын чагылдырылышына тийгизген таасиринен баштап көз карандысыздыкты чектей алган демөөрчүлүккө жана өндүрүмдүн жайгаштырылуусуна жасалган басымдуулукка чейин. Демөөрчүлүккө ишмердүүлүгү тууралуу кабардар болгондукту жогорулатуу максатында ЮНИСЕФ сыяктуу эл аралык уюмдар менен болгон өнөктөштүк мамилелер киргизилип, ММКнын чагылдыруусуна таасирин тийгизишет делген каржылоонун башка булактарына караганда, жогоруда айтылган уюмдар кыйла ишенимдүүрөөк деп эсептелүүдө. Эл аралык колдоо (донорлор менен социалдык тармактык компаниялар тарабынан) жергиликтүү басмаканаларды каржылоонун жаңы булактарын аныктоого жана табууга, ошондой эле жаңылыктарды окуп жаткан аудиториянын көңүлүн тартуу максатында массалык маалымат каражаттарынын жашоо таризине жана ар түрдүү көңүл ачуучу иш-чараларга кызыктырууга керектелиши мүмкүн. Тренингдердин болуп туруу үчүн уюштурулган көптөгөн тренингдерден баш тартуу керектиги айтылса да, жөндөмдүулүктө болгон айырмачылык дагы деле сакталууда, өзгөчө кыргыз тилдүү жана жергиликтүү журналистиканын жаатында. Балким, эл аралык жаңылыктарын кыргыз тилдүү аудиториясына даярдап, жарыялоодо эл аралык өнөктөштөр жергиликтүү басмаканаларга өз жардамын мыдан ары да көрсөтө алаттыр. Бейөкмөт уюмдардай эле, көз карандысыз массалык маалымат каражаттарына жасалган басым бир гана каржылоо маселесине байланыштуу болбостон, саясатчылар, атайын кызматтар, бай жана таасирдүү инсандарга байланыштуу көмүскө күчтөрдүн тарабынан дагы кошумча басым жасалууда. Ковид пандемиясы саясатчыларга “Маалыматты манипуляциялоо жөнүндө” жаңы мыйзамды киргизүү аракетине өбөлгө тузүп берди.[149] Бул мыйзамдын долбооруна мурунку президент Сооронбай Жээнбеков кол койбой, парламентке кайрадан карап чыгууга жөнөткөн. Бирок, бийлик алмашкан соң жаңы түзүлгөн өкмөт бул мыйзам долбоорун кайра кайтаруу ниетин билдиришкен.[150] Пандемияга байланыштуу жалган маалыматтын таралышы менен күрөшүү максатында түзүлүмүш болгон мыйзамды эл аралык байкоочулар бул мыйзам долбоорду так эмес жана өтө кеңири деп сыпатташкан. Мыйзам чыгаруу ыйгарым укуктарынан кыянаттык менен пайдалануусу боюнча ачык коркунчутар жогоруда айтылгандай пандемиянын учурунда мамлекеттин көргөн чараларына каршы чыккандарга карата мыйзамдар коопсуздук кызматтар тарабынан бузулганы күчөй баштаган.[151] 2020-жылдын октябрдагы өткөн шайлоолордо болжолдуу орун алган тартип бузуулар боюнча чыгарган репортаждары үчүн журналисттер онлайн дагы, физикалык дагы басымга кабыл болушкан.[152] Эрик МакГлинчи өз ишинде белгилегендей, президент Жапаров “Массалык маалымат каражаттары менен сөз эркиндиги кол тийгис баалуулук бойдон кала берет” деген убаданы берген. Бирок, шайлоодогу жеткен жеңиштен кийин жүрөктүн үшүн алган сөзүн кошумчалаган: “ММКнын укугун коргойм, бирок менин же башка саясатчылардын жана чиновниктердин сөзүн бурмалабай, айтылган билдирүүлүрүбуздү контексттен үзүп алып колдонбогонуңарды өтүнөм. Эгерде муну аткарсаңар, силерге эч кандай куугунтуктар жасалбайт.”[153] Азаттык Радиосуна, жана өлкөдөгү онлайн-жаңылыктар менен радионун негизги булагына маалыматтын таркашына бөгөт коюууну көздөгөн саясатчылар элдин көзүнчө асылып, журналисттер болсо атайын кызматтардын жана мүмкүн алар жүргүзгөн иликтөөлөрүнүн негизги каармандарынын да тарабынан басымга кабылышкан.[154] Уюшкан кылмыштуулукка тийиштүүлөр менен болжолдуу байланыштары тууралуу жасалган билдирүүлөрдү чагылдырганы үчүн президент Жапаров “Азаттыкты” элдин алдында сынга алган.[155] Бул кадамы Трамптан кийинки Эркин Европа Радиосу/Эркиндик Радиосу менен жүргүзгөн  стратегиясын кайрадан кененирээк жаңыртуунун жана Жапаровдун администрациясы менен жаңы мамилелердин алкагында Эркин Европа Радиосу/Эркиндик Радиосунун саясий аймагын активдүү коргоодо жана журналисттердин коопсуздугун камсыздоодо Байден администрациясы үчүн чоң мааниге ээ. Учурда Би-Би-Сидеги Кыргыз Кызматы жергиликтүү медиарыногунда жергиликтүү өкүлдөр тарабынан маанилүү оюнчу катары кабыл алынбай, Би-Би-Синин башкармалыгы бул кырдаалды өзгөртүү үчүн жаңы жолдорун (мисалы жеригликтүү басмаканалар менен өнөктөштүктү түзүү) ойлонуп чыгуу зарыл. Интернет-троллинг журналисттерге (жана бейөкмөт уюмдардын активисттерине) карата жасалчу басымдын олуттуу куралы болуп калгандай. Бул троллингдин эки көрүнүктүү булагы билинүүдө. Биринчиси Орусиялык кесиптештердин масштабына жетпесе да, журналисттерге бут тосуп жана аларды аңдуу үчүн төлөнүп, колдонулган уюшкан троллдордун фабрикалары өз ишин жүргүзө башташкан. OpenDemocracy жарыялаган иликтөө репортаждары интернет-троллдор төлөөгө даяр болгондордун атынан жүргүзгөн операцияларын байкап, аныктаган. Каржылагандардын бирисин кээ бирлер Матраимовдор менен байланыштырып, “Kloop”, “Азаттык” жана башка көз карандысыз басылмалардын журналисттерине чабуул жасалгандыгы анын буйругу менен экен деп божомолдоодо.[156] Бул троллдордун тармагы башында 2020-жылкы октябрдагы шайлоолордо “Мекеним Кыргызстан” партиясынын саясий кампаниясын уюштурууда, жана Жапаровдун шайлоолордон кийинки убакыттагы Конституцияга киргизилүүчү өзгөртүүлөрдү колдогон кампаниясы менен 2021-жылдын январдагы Президенттик шайлоолордо колдонулганы анык.[157] Экинчи булагын болсо күчү өсүп жаткан улутчул топтор менен Жапаровдун чыныгы колдоосун көргөн популисттик жана улутчул интернет-коомчулугу түзгөн. Башка өлкөлөрдөгү популисттердей эле, мындай көрүнүш убакыттын өтүшү менен кымбат жана тез ылдамдыкта троллдорду түзүүгө муктаждыкты азайта ала турган жол аркылуу төлөнмө троллдордун ишин толуктап, күчөтө алган ээн-эркин жандуу троллдордун пайда болушуна алып келген. Бул жыйынга кирген Гульзат Баялиеванын, Жолдон Кутманалиевдин, Бегаим Усенованын, 19-Макала жана доктор Элира Турдубаеванын эмгектери куугунтуктун көбү жайгашкан кыргыз тилдүү ММКларда пайда болгон онлайн-кыймалдарын жана троллингдин кампанияларын изилдемекчи.[158] Кыргызстандагы эң көп колдонулган билдирүү кызматтарынын жана социалдык тармактарынын ишин камсыздаган Facebook (Facebook, Instagram жана WhatsApp), Азия-Тынчокеандык аймагына тиешелүү коомдук саясатынын алкагында Кыргызстанды кошо камтыган Борбордук Азия аймагында да көзөмөл жүргүзүүдө. Коомдук саясаттын командасы “Фэйсбук” компаниясынын Борбордук Азияда ишин жүргүзүү үчүн компаниянын коомчулук менен ишин жүргүзгөн (контентентти текшерип, көзөмөлдөгөн командасы) жана юридикалык командалары кошумча өбөлгө болуп берет. “Фэйсбуктун” коомчулук менен ишин жүргүзгөн командасы машиналык окутууга чоң басым жасоодо. “Фэйсбук” компаниясы негизги ишинен тышкары “Ишенимдүү өнөктөштөр” (Trusted Partners) аттуу программасынын серепчилери болуп саналууда.[159] Mашиналык окутуунун негизги маңызын эске алуу менен жасалма интеллекттин жергиликтүү маданиятты жана анын өзгөчөлүктөрүн түшүнбөгөнү үчүн каталарга жана кээ бир маселелерине көңүл бурулбай калышына алып келиши ыктымал. Ошондуктан, шайлоо жана референдум сыяктуу “курч” темаларга тийиштүү контентти көзөмөлдөө максатында кыргыз тилдүү рецензенттерин көбүрөөк санда ишке аралаштыруу жана ишмердүүлүктү кыргыз тилде жүргүзүү мүмкүнчүлүктөрүн кеңейтүү жолдорун “Фэйсбук” компаниясынын ойлонуп чыгышына маани берилет. Ошондой эле, уюшкан куугунтукка кабылган журналисттер менен активисттер үчүн адам тарабынан башкарылган текшерип чыгуу процесстерине тез жана оңой жеткиликтүүлүктүн камсыздалышы да иштелип чыгышы керек. Мыйзам үстөмдүгүКыргызстандын коомдук жашоосунун башка тармактарындай эле, укук системасынын ишмердүүлүгү жергиликтүү коррупция менен бийликтегилерге кызмат кылуунун айынан токтоп калууда. Бул көрүнүштөрдүн мыйзам үстөмдүгүнө тийгизген начар таасири жыйынга кирген Жасмин Кэмерондун эмгегинде баса белгиленген. Президенттин Аппаратынан баштап жергиликтүү саясатчыларга чейин Башкы прокуратура, укук коргоо органдар жана сот системасы учурдагы мезгилде бийликти башкарып тургандардын орчундуу саясий таасиринин алдында ишин жүргүзгөнү айдан-ачык. Жогорку бийлик тарабынан так аныкталган саясий багыты белгиленбеген учурларда төмөнүрөөк даражада коррупциянын кошумча мүмкүнчүлүктөрүнө жол ачылууда. “Адилет” юридикалык клиникасы сыяктуу жергиликтүү бейөкмөт уюмдар прокурорлор менен сотторго расмий көзөмөл жана тартип механизмдери натыйжасыз болгонун айтып, жазасыздык маданиятын туудурган буйруктарды аткарган чиновниктердин учуруна өзгөчө басым жасалган.[160] Коррупция менен саясий фаворит кишилердин ишке келгени соттук бийликтин тандалышына таасирин тийгизгени анык. Мисалы, (шарттуу түрдө парламенттик көпчүлүк менен оппозицияга бөлүштүрүлгөн) үчтөн эки бөлүгүн “өз” саясий адамдардан тузүлгөн Сотторду тандоо Кеңеши аркылуу шайлангандар жана Жогорку сотко караштуу адилеттүүлүктүн жогорку мектебинде сотторду даярдоо үчүн тандоодон өткөндөр болуп бере алат. Судьяларды тандоо реформасы 2021-жылдын февраль айындагы Баш мыйзамдын долбооруна киргизилген. Анда, жаңы түзүлө турган “Сот адилеттиги иштери боюнча кеңеши аны түзгөн үчтөн эки бөлүгүнөн кем эмес судьялардан куралышы (куралат) абзел. Бул курамдын үчтөн бир бөлүгү Президенттин, Жогорку Кеңештин, Элдик Курултайдын жана юридикалык коомчулуктун өкүлдөрүнөн түзүлүшү керек” деген маалымат чагылдырылган.[161] Бир жагынан мындай өзгөрүүлөр саясатчылар менен сот органдарынын ортосунда формалдуу аралыкты кеңейтүү үчүн келечекте өз пайдасын көргөзүшү мүмкүн, бирок учурда болуп турган судьялардын бирикмелеринин жана алардын байланыштарын эч өзгөртө албайт. Жада калса алар дагы деле саясаттагы мыйзам бузууларга карата жана коррупцияны жою боюнча бир да ишти жасабастан бүгүнкү күнгө тузүлүп калган укук маданиятын кийинкиге бекемдей алат. Баш мыйзамга киргизилчү маанилүүлүгү төмөнүрөөк болуп саналган прокуратуранын ыйгарым укуктарын кеңейтүү сунуштамасы болууда. Бул өзгөртүү боюнча “прокуратурага жарандарды, коммерциялык уюмдарды, башка чарбачылык субъекттерди, бейөкмөт жана коммерциялык эмес уюмдарды, мекемелерди, ишканаларды ж.б.у.с. текшерүүгө укук берилмекчи”. Буга “Адилет” юридикалык клиникасы “мындай кадам башка мамлекеттик жана укук коргоочу органдардын ишмердүүлүгүн кайталап калмак”, алгач “Коррупция менен күрөшүүнүн Улуттук коопсуздуктун мамлекеттик комитетинин” жана  жогоруда айтылган органдардын функцияларынын советтик доордогудай кудуреттүү прокуратурада топтолушун мүмкүн кылмак деген түшүндүрмө берүүдө.[162] Мындай өзгөртүүлөр режим ичинде талаш-тартышууларда ар түрдүү ведомстволорду колдонуу мүмкүнчүлүгүн кыскарта алса дагы, прокурорлор керексиз басым жасоо үчүн көптөгөн баскычтар менен камсыздандандырылууда, анткени Кыргызстандын тарыхында мындай өзгөртүүлөр киргизилген эмес, жана бул кадам чоң этияттык менен гана жасалып, күчтүү кепилдиктердин пайда болушу керек эместей эле. Кэмерон белгилегендей, былтыр милиция кыматкерелеринин колуна түшкөн адамдардын 61%зы пара берүү керектигин билдирип, коррупцияга каршы күрөшүү жаатында укуктардын тебеленишин жана көзөмөлдүн жоктугун ачык айткан. Бул жыйындагы бир катар авторлор ЛГБТ коому жана өзбек ишкерлер сыяктуу аялуу коомчулуктарынын укук коргоо кызматкерлеринин тарабынан опузаланганын конкреттүү мисалдарын келтирүүдө. Ошол эле автордун айтканына көңүл бурсак, коррупция менен бийликти кыянаттык менен колдонулушу биргелешип күмөндүү укук маданиятын жаратып, жарандардын соттук процесстереге ишенбей калышына алып келүүдө. Андай учурларда маселени чечүүнүн башка амалдарын табууга аргасыз кылып, жада калса сот залында каршы тарапка, адвокаттарга жана сот бийлигинин өкүлдөрүнө карата зомбулукка чейин жетүүдө. Башкы прокуратуранын алдында иштеген таасирдүү прокурорлорго караганда коргонууну жүргүзгөн адвокаттардын статусун жогорулатуу боюнча чоң иштерди аткарып чыгуу зарыл, алардын ичинен бирден бир болуп сурактын маалында шектүүлөрдүн жанында адвокаттардын отурушун камсыздоо.[163] Мындан сырткары, ачык-айкындык менен отчеттуулукту камсыздоо максатында сот залдарына камералардын колдонулушун маанилүүлүгунө басым жасоо менен аларды орнотуу боюнча аракеттери жасалып жатат. Ал эми ABA (American Bar Association – Америкалык юридикалык ассоциациясы) жана Клунинин “Trial Watch” Фонд сыяктуу эл аралык уюмдар талаштуу сот иштеринин каралуу шарттарынын үстүнөн байкоо жүргүзүү максатында расмий байкоочуларды жөнөткөнү далалат кылууда.[164] Ошондо дагы, бир нече серепчилер билдиргендей, Кыргызстандагы мыйзамдын үстөмдүгүн реформалоого эл аралык уюмдар инвестицияларын тартканына карбастан (мисалы Европа Биримдиги тарабынан 2014-2020 жылдардын ичинде жалпы 38 миллион евронун бөлүнгөнү) азыркы күнгө чейин чектелген гана натыйжалары көрүнүүдө, тартыштуу иштерди өзгөчө белгилей кетүү зарыл.[165] Кэмерон белгилегендей, үй-бүлөлүк зомбулук кеңири таралган кубулуш болгон өлкөдө 2019-жылы жалпы жонунан үй-бүлөлүк зомбуллуктун 9000 учуру катталган. “Алардын ичинен орто ченем менен алганда 5456 учуру укук коргоо кызматкерлери тарабынан административдик иштер катары катталып, бир гана 784 учуру кылмыш учурлары болуп белгиленген”. Мындай көрүнүш укук коргоо системасына болгон ишенимсиздикти чагылдырып, абдан терең кеткен маданий тоскоолдуктарды көрсөтүүдө.[166] Жарандык жана саясий укуктар боюнча эл аралык пакт менен байланыштуу болгон кишилерге карата укук бузууларын жана сот иштерин караган серепчи орган Адам укуктары боюнча БУУнун Комитети адам укуктар жаатында талаштуу иштерди кайрадан карап чыгуу өтүнмөлөрүнө жооп берүүдө маанилүү сырткы ролду ойногон. Жалпысынан 25 ишти карап, алардын арасында төмөндө берилген Азимжан Аскаровдун да иши болгон.[167] Кыргызстанда эл аралык укуктук органдар тарабынан сынга алынган жергиликтүү иштерди кайрадан карап чыгууга талаптарды жокко чыгаруу аракеттери жасалганына карабастан, Аскаровго карата жасалган эл аралык басымга жооп кайтаруу менен Орусия, Улуу Британия жана өзгөчө АКШ тарабынан жасалчу эл аралык көзөмөлгө каршы жүргүзүлгөн иш-аракеттер колдоого алынууда.[168] 

Азимжан Аскаров

Айдар Сыдыковдун баяндамасы

 Азимжан Аскаров Кыргыз Республикасынын укук коргоочу жана журналист катары кеңири таанымал болгон.  Азимжан Аскаров Эл аралык Мунапыс уюму тарабынан абийир туткуну катары жарыяланып, прессанын эркиндиги үчүн ыйгарылган Эл аралык CPJ (Committee to Protect Journalists – Журналисттерди коргогон комитети) сыйлыгына ээ болгон. 1996-жылы адам укуктарын коргоо жаатында ишин баштап, 2002-жылы “Воздух” аттуу бейөкмөт уюмун түзгөн. Бул уюмдун негизги максаты жергиликтүү милиция менен пенитенциардык мекемелер тарабынан адам укуктарын бузуу фактыларын каттоо жана аларды иликтөө болгон. 2010-жылы Аскаровго жергиликтүү бийлик массалык баш аламандыкты уюштуруу жана ага катышуу, эл аралык чырды козутуу менен Базар-Коргондо (Жалал-Абад облусу) июнь айындагы кыргыз-өзбек тирешүүнүн учурунда милиция кызматкерин өлтүрүү айыптарын моюнуна тагып, эркиндигинен өмүр бою ажыраткан. Көптөгөн укук коргоо уюмдардын пикирине караганда, Аскаров өзү жүргүзгөн укук коргоо ишмердүүлүгү үчүн айыпталган. 2010-жылдагы коогалаңдын учурунда орун алган талкалоолорду, өрттөлгөн субъекттерди, каза тапкандар менен жаракат алгандар (жаңжалга катышпаган жарандарды дагы) тууралуу маалыматты тактап, топтоп жүргөнү айыптоолордун негизин түзгөн. Азимжан Аскаровдун тергөө иши көптөгөн адам укуктарынын одоно бузулушу менен коштолгон. Абакта Аскаров бир нече ирээт кыйноого алынып, катаал мамилеге кабылган. Ал эми мамлекеттик органдар болсо соттук коргоо укугун колдонулушуна жана анын ишин соттун адилеттүү карашына тоскоолдук жараткан. Аскаровдун адвокаты Азимжанга карата жасалган катаал мамиле, кыйноо жана башка бузуулар боюнча бир нече доо арыздарын жазганына карабастан 2010-жылдын 15-сентябрында коюлган айыптар боюнча күнөлүү деп табылып, өмүр бою эркининен ажыратуу өкүмү чыгарылган. Бул өкүмү жогорку соттор тарабынан күчүндө калтырылган. Денесине келтирилген зыянды, кармоо учурунда кыйноо фактыларын тастыктаган бардык медициналык документтер жана эл аралык медициналык серепчилер жүргүзгөн эки медициналык экспертизаларынын жыйынтыктары соттун бардык инстанциялары, прокуратура жана башка мамлекеттик органдар тарабынан бир да көңүлгө алынган эмес. Кыргыз Республикасынын Жогорку Сотунун акыркы чыгарган өкүмүнөн кийин Аскаров жеке доо арызын БУУнун адам укуктары боюнча комитетине узаткан. Ал доо арызында башынан өткөргөн кыйноону, укуктук коргоонун эффективдүү каражаттардын Кыргызстан тарабынан камсыздалбагынын, абактагы зомбулук менен адамгерчиликсиз мамилени, ишин адилеттүү сот текшерүүгө жана өз оюн эркин чагылдырууга болгон укуктарын тебеленгенин билдирген. 2016-жылы БУУнун Адам укуктар боюнча Комитети өз чечиминде Жараандык жана саясий укуктар боюнча эл аралык Пактка ылайк Аскаровдун укуктары бузулганын далилдеген. Комитет токтомунда Кыргызстан Аскаровго келтирген зыядын ордун толтурууга, дароо абактан бошотууга, өкүмүн күчүнөн чыгарып, керек болсо анын ишин адилеттүү каралуу кепилдиги менен кайрадан карап чыгууга милдеттендирген. 2016-жылдын 12-июньда БУУнун Адам укуктар боюнча Комитетинин чечимин жаңы ачылган факттар катары кабыл алып, Кыргызстандын Жогорку Соту мурунку сот өкүмдөрүн жокко чыгарып, анын ишин кайрадан биринчи инстанциядагы сотко карап чыгууга буйрук берген. Тилекке каршы, Аскаров даярдап берген бардык далилдерге жана БУУ чыгарган чечимине карабай, жергиликтүү соттор кыйноо боюнча фактыларын кайрадан карап чыгуудан баш тартып, бул далилдерди окуп-изилдеп чыгууга жана күнөлүүлөрдү табып, жоопкерчиликке тартууга эч кандай аракетин көрбөй коюшкан.  2020-жылдын май айында Жогорку сот жергиликтүү соттордун ишти кайрадан карап чыгуудан баш тартуу чечимин күчүндө калтырып, айып өкүмүн жокко чыгарбастан Азимжан Аскаровду өмүр бою түрмөгө отургузуу чечими күчүнөн ажыраткан эмес. Тилекке каршы, 2020-жылдын 25-июлда адвокатынын жөнөткөн арызына жана Аскаровдун ден-соолугунун начар абалына байланыштуу ага шашылыш түрдө медициналык кароо менен дарылануу керектиги эл аралык деңгээлде коңгуру кагып чыкканына карабастан, COVID-19 пандемиясынын учурунда Азимжан Аскаров абакта көз жумган.

 Адам укуктары2020-жылы Аскаровдун кайгылуу өлүмүнө чейин анын иши кыргыз сот системасынын оңунан чыкпай калган эң чуулгундуу иши болуп саналат. Бул иш укук коргоочунун куугунтукталганын олуттуу учурунун жана түштүктөгү этника аралык чыңалууну акыйкаттуу чечүү жолун таба албай калгандыктан пайда болгон саясий “шал оорусунун” уланып жаткан символу катары эсептелет. Бирин бири алмаштырып келген алдыңкы саясатчылар түштүктөгү жергиликтүү таасирдүү адамдарга милдеттүү болуп калып, бул аймактагы этникалык кыргыз калкынын кыжырын кайрадан келтирүүдөн коркушкан.  Кыргызстандагы адилеттүүлүк Аскаров каза болгондон кийин жетишсиз болуп калса да, соттун Аскаровдун жесир жубайына анын аппеляциялык арыз берүү укугунан четтетсе дагы акыйкатыкка жетүү мүмкүнчүлүгүн колдо кармоо менен эл аралык коомчулук тарабынан дагы кандай кадамдар жасоого мүмкүн болушу жөнүндө ой жүгүртүү зарыл.[169] Азимжан Аскаровдун учурунда анын камакка алынышына болгон системалык жоопкерчиликтин анык эмес болгондугу бул иштин көйгөйлөрүнүн бири болгон. Бирок, бул ишке тиешелүү болгон кызматкерлерге карата Улуу Британия, АКШ, Европа Биримдиги жана башка мамлекеттер тарабынан Магнитскийдин санкцияларын колдонулушуна орчундуу аргумент бар, мисалы мындай кадам бул ишке тиешеси бар болгондордун көпчүлүгү мыйзам ченемде тийгизген таасири аз болгон учурда деле жогоруда айтылган өлкөлөр жазасыздыкка каршы белгини берүүдө. Кыйноо боюнча арыздар катталган учурлардын арасында Азимжан Аскаровдун иши биринчи эмес, мисалы 2019-жылдын биринчи жарым жылында Башкы прокуратурада орун алган кыйноолор боюнча 171 арыз келип түшкөн.[170] Адвокаттар болобу, бейөкмөт уюмдардын өкүлдөрү болобу, укук коргоочулар атайын кызматтар тарабынан куугунтукка жана интернет талаасында улутчул троллинге үзгүлтүксүз түрдө дуушар болууда.[171] Бир катар эл аралык укук коргоочулар менен көз карандысыз журналисттердин Кыргызстанга кирүүсүнө эмдигиче тыюу салынган. Алар –  Human Rights Watch (“Адам укуктарынын сакчысы”) бейөкмөт уюмунун өкүлү Михра Риттман, AFP (Agence France-Presse – Франс-пресс агенствосу) журналисти Крис Риклтон жана орусиялык “Мемориал” аттуу укук коргоо бейөкмөт уюмунун Борбордук Азия боюнча бөлүмүнүн директору Виталий Пономарев.[172] Ошондой эле, кыйноого кабылуу коркунучтарына карабастан  Өзбекстандын журналисти Бобомурод Абдуллаевдин (мурун өзбек бийлик тарабынан кыйноого алынган) экстрадициялоо өтүнмөсүн Кыргызстан күмөн саноо менен кабыл алган.[173] Эл аралык байланыштар жана алардын Кыргызстанга тийгизген таасири Кыргыз Республикасы кичи жана араңжан экономикага ээ болгон өлкө болгондуктан, Кыргызстандын туруктуулугунун жана жетишкендиктеринин маанилүү фактору болуп, аймактык коңшу өлкөлөр жана эл аралык державалардын ортосундагы болгон мамилелер эсептелүүдө. Мурунураак айтылгандай, Кыргызстан Орусия башкарган Евразия экономикалык бирикмесине мүчө болгону Орусия жана Казакстан менен экономикалык интеграциясынын андан аркы кеңейүүсүнө түрткү берип, ал өлкөлөргө (орто эсеп менен 513 000 Орусияга жөнөгөн мигранттар) ири санда багыттаган экономикалык мигранттардын координациясын кандайдыр бир деңгээлде жакшыртты.[174] Акыркы жылдары өлкөдө Кытайдын экономикалык кызыкчылыктары кичине карама-каршылыктары менен өсүп, коопсуздук жаатында кызматташтыка басым жасап, Пекин башкарган Шанхай кызматташтык уюмуна да Кыргызстандын мүчө болгонун кошумчалай кетиш керек. Фергана өрөөнүндөгү Өзбекстан жана Тажикистан менен кылдаттыкты талап кылган чек-ара жана суу маселелери Кыргызстандын түштүгүндө жашаган өзбек жана башка азчылыктарынын жамаат аралык  мамилелерде дүрбөлөң атмосферасын күчөтүүдө.[175] “Манас” авиабазасы Ооганстанда операцияларды жүргүзүү максатында 2014 жылы колдонулганы токтотулгандан кийин, чектелген экономикалык мүмкүнчүлүктөрдүн шарттарында Батыштын стратегиялык кызыкчылыктары көбүнчө баңгизат соодалашуу жана терроризм менен күрөшүү маселелеринде камтылган. Кандай болсо да, Борбордук Азия аймагында орноп калган стандарттары боюнча Кыргызстан ачык өлкө болуп саналып, Батыштын эл аралык жардамы менен ишмердүүлүктүн борборуна айланып калган. Жапаровдун бийлике капыстан келиши Кыргызстандын эл аралык өнөктөштөрүн чочулатты. Батыш мамлекеттердин тынчсыздануу боюнча жасалган билдирүүлөрүнө кошумчаланып мурунку президенттин ордуна келген кишиге карата Путиндин салкын мамилеси, өзгөчө 10-ноябрда өткөн КМШ өлкөлөрүнүн жолугушуусундагы Жапаровду ачык капарга албаганында билинди. Бирок, кийин 10-январдагы президенттик шайлоодон кийин ортодогу мамилелер өз нугуна түшкөн.[176] Шайлоолук баш аламандыктарга чейин Кыргызстандын тышкы карызынынын 43% на, дээрлик таасир этүүнүн маанилүү баскычтарына ээлик кылган Кытайга карыз маселеси боюнча кайрылган, анткени COVID пандемиясынан улам кырдаал начарланганына карабастан Бишкек карызын жабуу боюнча болгон аракетин жумшаганын көрүп, Кытай карызды төлөө мөөнөтүн жылдырууга макул болгон.[177] Жапаровдун бийликке келгенден кийин жана ага байланыштуу кытайлык башкаруучулардын баштапкы тынчсыздануусун жою үчүн Кырргызстан эл аралык инвесторлорду (өзгөчө кытайлык) жаңы президенттин мурунку ресурстук улутчулдугуна жана анын кээ бир тарапташтарынын кытайга каршы маанайда (Карнеги Москва Борборунда эмгектенген Темур Умаровго караганда, Жапаров Кытай менен үй-бүлөлүк жана иш байланыштарына ээ) болгонуна карабастан алардын тынчсызданууларына эч кандай негизи жок экенине ынандыруу үчүн мүмкүн болгон бардык аракетин жасады.[178] Батыш мамлекеттер менен расмий мамилердин алкагында Европа Биримдиги менен Кыргызстандын кеңейтилген өнөктөштүк жана кызматташтыгы боюнча түзүлгөн келишими 2019-жылдын июль айында кол коюлганына карабастан, дагы деле ратификацияланган эмес. Себеби анын котормосу кечигип, ага да кошумча жана маанилүүрөөк болуп Европа парламентинин ратификациясына таасир этүүчү адам укуктары жаатында тузүлүп калган кырдаал сыяктуу потенциалдуу көйгөлөр болгон.[179] Азыркы маалда Улуу Британия Европа Биримдиги менен Кыргызстандын ортосунда өнөктөштүк жана кызматташтык боюнча 1999-жылда түзүлгөн келишимдин негизинде өнөктөштүк келишимди түзүү боюнча талкуулоолорду жүргүзүүдө. Бирок, бул келишимдин түзүлүшү Улуу Британия үчун пайдасын көбүрөөк тийгизе турган макулдашууларга (Кыргызстан үчүн эң актуалдуу жана кыжырланткан Казакстан менен түзүлгөн келишими болууда) кол коюлгандан кийин гана ыктымал. Албетте, Улуу Британия 1999-жылкы келишимдин ордуна Европа Биримдиги менен Кыргызстандын ортосунда 2019-жылы түзүлгөн келишимдин негизинде макулдашууга кол коюуну сунуштоо менен бул макулдашууну тездетүүгө басым жасап, ордуна башкаруу стандарттарын жакшыртуу жана адам укуктарын коргоодо белгилүү бир чараларды көрүүнү камсыздоо менен өз ак көңүлдүүлүгүн билдирип, таасир кылуунун чектелген баскычтарына ээ боло алмак.[180] Европа Биримдиги жана анын мүчө-мамлекеттери жардам катары Кыргызстанга 2007-2020 жылдардын аралыгында жалпысынан 907,69 миллион евро (эң ири донор катары Европа Комиссиясы 391,3 миллион евро сарптап, андан кийин 349,69 миллион евро жөнөткөн Германия болгон) каражаттарын которушкан.[181] Европа Биримдигинин эки тараптуу  өнүктүрүү кызматташтыгынын эң акыркы келишими “2014-2020 жылдардын аралыгында жалпы 174 миллион евро бюджети менен Көп жылдык индикативдик программасына” негизделип, бул программа төмөнкүдөй үч негизги тармакатарга басым жасаган – “Билим берүү (71,8 миллион евро), Мыйзам үстөмдүгү (37,8 миллион евро) жана Айыл жергелерин комплекстүү өнүктүрүү (61,8 миллион евро)”. Кийин, COVID пандемиясына байланыштуу өзгөчө кырдаалдагы жардамдын пакетинин алкагында 2020-жылы кошумча 36 миллион евро бөлүнгөн.[182] Акыркы убакытка чейин Европа Биримдигинин ичинен Германия эң ири эки тараптуу донор болуп келген, бирок 2020-жылдын май айында Кызматташтык менен экономикалык өнүктүрүүнүн Федералдык министрлиги (BMZ) өз аракеттерин дүйнөнүн башка мамлекеттерине багыттоонун алкагында Кыргызстанды өнүктүрүү максатында эки тараптуу сарптоолорду токтотуу чечимин жарыялаган.[183] ЮСАИД (USAID) уюмунун 2020-жылда жардамга бөлүнгөн каражаттары 40,17 миллион долларга барабар болду. Чыгашалардын эң ири статьясы башкаруу, демократия жана адам укуктарын коргоо тармагы болгон – 13,3 миллион доллар сарпталып, бюджеттин 33% тузгөн; андан кийин Билим берүү тармагы болгон – 9,07 миллион доллар, 23%; акыркы  экономикалык өнүктүрүү менен саламаттыкты сактоо тармактары болушкан.[184] Улуу Британия тарабынан 2020/2021 финансылык жылы үчүн түз жардамга бөлүнгөн каражаттарынын саны 7,47 миллион фунт стерлингге жеткен, бирок бул сан 2022/2023 финансылык жылына 5,15 миллион фунт стерлингге чейин төмөндөшү күтүлүүдө, анткени COVID пандемиясынан улам жардамга бөлүнгөн жалпы каражаттардын Улуу британиянын ички дүң продукциясынан 0,7%дан 0,5%га кыскартылганына туздөн түз байланыштуу.[185] Улуу Британия өкмөтүнүн учурдагы приоритеттери төмөнкүдөй: мамлекеттик каржы маселелерин башкаруунун ачык-айкындыгы; коррупция менен күрөшүү жана натыйжаларын жакшыртуу; көзөмөлдү жакшыртуу максатында өкмөт кызматкерлери менен иш жүргүзүү; жеке секторго инвестицияларды тартуу үчүн укук-ченемдик чөйрөнү жакшыртуу. Бул жыйынга кирген бир катар эмгектерде жана аягындагы корутундусунда белгиленгендей, учурда иштеп жаткан схемаларда жеткен прогресстин деңгээлин кайрадан карап чыгууга жана системадагы саясий партиялар менен формалдуу институттарда колдонулган жашыруун саясат менен алардын контекстинде донорлордун приоритеттерин болжолдуу түрдө карап чыгууга орчундуу негиз бар. Эң аз дегенде бүгүнкү күнгө чейин чыныгы чечимдерди чыгаруу укуктарынын көбү бул системадан сыртта, башка жактарда болгон. Өз мүмкүнчулүктөрүн узак-мөөнөттө кеңейтүүнү көздөгөн донорлордун приоритеттерин эске албаганда, маанилүү кызматтарда тез тез өзгөрүп турган кырдаал ансыз деле Кыргызстандагы чектелген эркиндиктин жолунан таюуну алдын алуунун жаңы жолдорун табууга мажбур кылат. Image by Sludge G under (CC). [1] Кыргызстан, Таджикистан жана Казакстанды камтыган эмгектердин сериясынын биринчи жыйыны.[2] Европа Тышкы иштер Кызматы (EEAS), Европа Биримдигинин 2019-жылдын дүйнөдөгү демократия жана адам укуктары боюнча жылдык доклады, өлкөлөр боюнча жаңы маалыматтар, https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/201007_eu_country_updates_on_human_rights_and_democracy_2019.pdf[3] Бул окуянын так деталдары кээ бирде талаш-тартышууларды туудурууда.[4] Франциско Олмос (Francisco Olmos),  Борбордук Азиядагы мамлекет негиздөөчү уламыштар, октябрь 2019, Форэйн Полиси Центр (FPC – Тышкы саясаттын борбору), https://fpc.org.uk/state-building-myths-in-central-asia/. Манас баатырдын тарыхта жашап өткөндүгү көп талаш-тартыштарды туудуруп келе жатат. Бирок, “Манас” эпосу XVIII-кылымда кагаз бетине түшүрүлүп баштаганга чейин оозеки кеп түрүндө сакталып, муундан муунга өтүп келген. Ага карабастан, Манастын ата теги жазууларда белгиленген убакыттан алда канча кийин пайда болгонун белгилеп, Манасты окумуштуулар тарыхый каарман катары кабыл албастан, Артур падышасына жакындаштырып, окшоштурууда.[5] BBC Жаңылыктардын Каналы, профиль баракчасы: Аскар Акаев, апрель 2005, http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/4371819.stm[6] Катэрина Путц, Кыргызстан жана Белоруссия: Куттуктоолор жана протест ноталары, август 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/08/kyrgyzstan-and-belarus-congratulations-and-notes-of-protest/  https://eurasianet.org/lukashenko-appears-alongside-dead-ex-kyrgyz-pm-after-protests; Бермет Талант, Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, август 2020, https://twitter.com/ser_ou_parecer/status/1292758150333059072?s=11[7] ЕККУнун Адам укуктары жана демократиялык институттар боюнча Бюросу, ЕККУ, октябрь 2017, https://www.osce.org/odihr/elections/kyrgyzstan/333296[8] Эл аралык каатчылык тобу,  Он жылга толгон Кыргызстан: “Демократиянын аралчасындагы” маселе, август 2001, https://www.crisisgroup.org/europe-central-asia/central-asia/kyrgyzstan/kyrgyzstan-ten-trouble-island-democracy[9] Кызматка Отунбаева дайындалган.[10] Дүйнөлүк Банк, калктын жан башына эсептелген ИДП (учурдагы АКШ доллар боюнча) – Кыргыз Республикасы, https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.PCAP.CD?locations=KG; Дүйнөлүк Банк, жеке акча которуулардан түшкөн каражаттардын саны (ИДПнын %) –  Кыргыз Республикасы, https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/BX.TRF.PWKR.DT.GD.ZS?locations=KG[11] Transparency International, Коррупцияны кабылдоо индекси – 2020, https://www.transparency.org/en/cpi/2020/index/kgz#; Freedom House, Nations in Transit 2020, Kyrgyzstan, https://freedomhouse.org/country/kyrgyzstan/nations-transit/2020; Freedom House, 2020-жылдагы дүйнөдөгү эркиндик,Кыргызстан  https://freedomhouse.org/country/kyrgyzstan/freedom-world/2020[12] Анна Лелик, Талаштуу “Тышкы агент” аттуу мыйзам долбоору Кыргызстандын парламенти тарабынан четке кагылды, The Guardian, май 2016, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/may/12/foreign-agent-law-shot-down-by-kyrgyzstan-parliament. Кошумча маалымат: FPC, Начар тажрыйба менен бөлүшүү: Мурунку Советтик Союздагы мамлекеттер жана институттар репрессиянын расмий ыкмаларын иштеп чыгууга көрсөткөн жардамы, май 2016, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/sharingworstpractice/[13] Форэйн Полиси Борборунун (FPC) 2018-жылкы басылмасында каралган өлкөдөгү улутчул менен дин маселелери: ‘Мурунку Советтер Союзунун мамлекеттеринде либералдык эмес жарандык коомдун өсүшү’, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/the-rise-of-illiberal-civil-society-in-the-former-soviet-union/[14] Камила Эшалиева, Кыргызстанда Кытайга каршы маанайлар өсүудөбү?, openDemocracy (оупен демокраси – көз карандысыз глобалдык медиа платформасы), март 2019, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/anti-chines e-mood-growing-kyrgyzstan/; Нурлан Алиев, Кыргыстандагы кытайлык мигранттарга каршы протест: Синофобиябы же социалдык адилеттикке талабыбы?, Борбордук Азия-Кавказ институту, апрель 2019, http://www.cacianalyst.org/publications/analytical-articles/item/13568-protest-against-chinese-migrants-in-kyrgyzstan-sinophobia-or-demands-for-social-justice; Дэвид Триллинг, Изилдөө көрсөткөндөй, өзбектердин жана башка коңшу мамлекеттердин кытайлык инвестицияларга болгон ишеними кичирейүүдө, Eurasianet, октябрь 2020, https://eurasianet.org/poll-shows-uzbeks-like-neighbors-growing-leery-of-chinese-investments; Рэйтерс(Reuters) жамааты, Кыргыз милициясынын кытайларга каршы митингди кууп таратышы, Reuters, январь 2019, https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-kyrgyzstan-protests-china-idUKKCN1PB1L7[15] Катэрина Путц,  Кыргыз алтын кениндеги чыңалуунун күчөшү, The Diplomat, август 2019, https://thediplomat.com/2019/08/tensions-flare-at-kyrgyz-gold-mine/[16] RFE/RL’s(Эркин Европа/Эркиндик радиолорунун) Кыргыз кызматы, Кыргыз протестчилер алтын кендеги чоң жолду кайрадан тосуууда, RFE/RL, октябрь 2013, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-kumtor-gold-nationalization/25129980.html; RFE/RL’s Кыргыз кызматы, Кыргыз протестчилер негизги алтын кендин мамлекеттештирилүүсүн кайрадан талап кылууда, RFE/RL, июнь 2013, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-kumtor-mine-protest/25029473.html; RFE/RL Кыргыз кызматы, Мурунку депутат Жапаров адамды барымтага алуу айыбы боюнча камакка алында, август 2017, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-japarov-hostage-taking-charge-jailed/28655237.html; Сэм Бутия,  Кыргызстандын экономикасы жакшы темп менен өсүп келе жатканы айтылууда. Чын элеби?, Eurasianet, ноябрь 2019, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-says-its-economy-is-growing-at-a-healthy-clip really#:~:text=The%20Kumtor%20mine%20alone%20contributed,remained%20stable%20in%20recent%20years.&text=Apart%20from%20depending%20on%20one,Kyrgyzstan's%20exports%20are%20not%20diversified[17] Катэрина Путц, Кыргыз-Кытай биргелишкен ишканасы протесттерден кийин жабылышы,The Diplomat, февраль 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/02/kyrgyz-chinese-joint-venture-scrapped-after-protests/[18] Офелиа Лай, Бишкектеги феминист искусствосунун көргөзмөсүнө тыюу салынышы, ArtAsiaPacific, декабрь 2019, http://www.artasiapacific.com/News/BishkekFeministArtExhibitionCensored[19] Мохира Суяркулова, Дурус чыкпаган Feminnale: Кыргызстандагы феминисттик искусствосунун “талаштуу”көргөзмөсү тууралуу ички адамдын (инсайдердин) көз карашы, openDemocracy, январь 2020, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/fateful-feminnale-an-insiders-view-of-a-controversial-feminist-art-exhibition-in-kyrgyzstan/[20] Ак-калпактын символдуулугу тууралуу кененирээк маалымат алуу үчүн: Ак-калпакты жаратуунун колдонулушу; Эркек кишинин баш кийиминин кийилишинин жана жаратуунун салттуу билими жана ыктары, Материалдык эмес маданий мурасы, UNESCO, https://ich.unesco.org/en/lists[21] Кыргызстандын борборунда аял укуктары үчүн марш болуп өттү, BBC дүйнөлүк мониторинг бөлүмүнүн алкагындагы BBC Борбордук Азиядагы мониторинг бөлүмү, март 2020, https://advance-lexis-com.mutex.gmu.edu/api/document?collection=news&id=urn:contentItem:5YD2-42T1-DYRV-33TC-00000-00&context=1516831[22] Рэйтерс(Reuters) жамааты, Таажы вирусунун таркалышы менен Борбордук Азия чектөөлөрдү күчөтүүдө, Рэйтерс, март 2020, https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-centralasia/central-asia-tightens-restrictions-as-coronavirus-spreads-idUSKBN218090; AFP (Agence France-Presse – француз маалымат агентствосу), КРдын Саламаттык сактоо министри жана вице-премьер пандемияга көрүлгөн начар даярдыктын айынан кызматынан алынышты, Business Standard (“Бизнес стандард” – Индиядагы бизнес жаатындагы жаңылыктардын басмасы), апрель 2020, https://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/kyrgyz-health-minister-vice-premier-sacked-over-coronavirus-response-120040100745_1.html[23] Бермет Талант,  Коронавирустук пневмониянын катталган учурларынын өсүшү менен Бишкекте ооруканалардагы орундар азаюууда, Medium, июль 2020, https://medium.com/@ser_ou_parecer/bishkek-running-out-of-hospital-beds-as-coronavirus-pneumonia-cases-surge-4817a7a41e1d. Мындай маселелери бүткүл дүйнө жүзү боюнча ортого чыккан, бирок Кыргызстандагы ансыз деле кыйналып жаткан саламаттык сактоо секторун пандемия ого бетер алсыратты.[24] AFP (Француз маалымат агенствосу),  КРнын Саламаттык сактоо министри жана вице-премьер пандемияга көрүлгөн начар даярдыктын айынан кызматынан алынышты, Business Standard, апрель 2020,  https://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/kyrgyz-health-minister-vice-premier-sacked-over-coronavirus-response-120040100745_1.html[25] Бактыгуль Осмоналиева, Саламаттык сактоонун мурунку министри Космосбек Чолпонбаев шалакылыкка шектелип, камакка алынды, 24.kg, сентябрь 2020, https://24.kg/english/165292__Ex-Minister_of_Health_Kosmosbek_Cholponbaev_detained_on_suspicion_of_negligence/[26] RFE/RL’s Кыргыз кызматы, Коррупция иликтөө боюнча Кыргызстандын премьер-министри кызматын бошотууда, RFE/RL, июнь 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyz-prime-minister-abylgaziev-resigns-corruption-probe/30672225.html[27] Руслан Харизов,  маска тагынуу талабын бузган үчүн Министрлердин кабинетинин мүчөлөрүнө 140 000 сом өлчөмүндө айып пул салынды, 24.kg, июнь 2020, https://24.kg/english/157124_Members_of_Cabinet_fined_140000_soms_for_violation_of_mask_requirement/[28] Мария Зозуля, Кыргызстандагы өзгөчо кырдаал: маскасыз өкмөт жана баалуу пропусктар, КАБАР, апрель 2020, https://cabar.asia/en/emergency-in-kyrgyzstan-government-without-masks-and-the-precious-passes[29] Камила Эшалиева, Кыргызстан таажы вирусу менен күрөштө жеңилип жатабы?, openDemocracy, июль 2020, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/kyrgyzstan-losing-fight-against-coronavirus/[30] Айзирек Иманалева, Кыргызстан: COVID-19 илдети менен күрөшүүдө ыктыярчылардын эрдиги, Eurasianet, июль 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-volunteers-play-heroic-role-in-battle-against-covid-19[31] Замира Кожобаева, Кыргыз Республикасындагы  COVID-19 пандемиясы: каза тапкандардын чыныгы саны расмий көрсөткүчтөрүнөн үч эсе жогору болушу ыктымал, Азаттык Радиосу, январь 2021, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/covid-19-v-kr-realnaya-smertnost-vyshe-ofitsialnyh-dannyh-v-tri-raza/31053269.html[32] Aйзирек Иманалиева, Кыргызстан:  Баш мыйзам долбоору бейөкмөт уюмдарды дубалга такоо коркунучун чагылдырууда, Eurasianet, May 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-draft-bill-threatens-to-drive-ngos-against-the-wall; Адам укуктары боюнча эл аралык өнөктөштүгү (IPHR),Борбордук Азия: COVID-19 пандемиясынын учурунда өкмөттүн ишин сындагандардын укуктарын чектөө, ноябрь 2020, https://www.iphronline.org/central-asia-tightening-the-screws-on-government-critics-during-the-covid-19-pandemic.html[33] Бул эки макала өзгөрүү динамикасын атаандашуунун эки башка  бурчтан чагылдырууда: Брюс Панниер, Кыргызстан шайлоолорунда азыркы убакытка чейин лидерлери да жок, таажы вирусун дагы эч ким жое элек, RFE/RL, август 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/no-coronavirus-postponement-and-no-front-runners-so-far-in-kyrgyz-elections/30771625.html жана Айзирек Иманалиеванын эмгеги, Кыргызстандагы шайлоо: Келбети менен жаңыланган парламент, бирок эски тариздеги саясат, Еurasianet, сентябрь 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-vote-new-look-parliament-but-old-style-politics[34] ЕККУнун шайлоодо жүргүзгөн байкоонун жыйынтыгы төмөнкүдөй маалыматты берген – “Банк отчетторуна таянсак, “Биримдик” саясий партиясы жалпы үгүт кампаниясына 104.6 миллион сомго тете чыгымдарды тарткан, “Кыргызстан” – 123.6 миллион сом жана “Мекеним Кыргызстан” партиясы жалпы жонунан 142.5 миллион сомду короткон. Калган башка пратиялардын отчетторуна карасак, алардын ар бирөөсүнүн чыгымы 53 миллион сомдон ашкан эмес”. ЕККУга караштуу Адам укуктары жана демократиялык институттар боюнча Бюросунун Шайлоолордо чектелген байкоо жүргүзүү Миссиясы, Жыйынтыктоочу отчет, Кыргыз Республикасы, Парламменттик шайлоолор, 4-октябрь 2020, ЕККУ, декабрь 2020, https://www.osce.org/files/f/documents/7/a/472461.pdf[35] Катэрина Путц,  Мушташуулар менен протесттерди кечирген Кыргызстандагы үгүт кампаниялары Шайлоо күндүн алдында, The Diplomat,  сентябрь 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/09/after-brawls-and-protests-kyrgyzstans-campaigns-near-election-day/[36] Мисал үчүн бул шилтеме менен өтүңүз: Chris Rickleton (Крис Риклтон), Твиттердеги пост , Twitter, October 2020, https://twitter.com/ChrisRickleton/status/1312649397168201729?s=20[37] Адам укуктары жана демократиялык институттар боюнча Бюросунун Шайлоолордо чектелген байкоо жүргүзүү Миссиясы, Жыйынтыктоочу отчет, Кыргыз Республикасы, Парламменттик шайлоолор, 4-октябрь 2020, ЕККУ, декабрь 2020, https://www.osce.org/files/f/documents/7/a/472461.pdf[38] Шайлоо боюнча маалыматтык система, Кыргыз Республикасынын Жогорку Кеңешине депутаттарды шайлоо, 4/10/2020, добуштарды эсептөөнүн алгачкы жыйынтыктары, https://newess.shailoo.gov.kg/en/election/11098/ballot-count?type=NW_ROOT[39] Эл аралык изилдөө институту (IRI – International Research Institute), Кыргызстандагы сурамжылоо боюнча парламенттик шайлоолордун алдында шайлоочулардын добуш берүү ниети жогору болорун божомолдонууда, сентябрь 2020, https://www.iri.org/resource/kyrgyzstan-poll-suggests-high-voter-intent-ahead-parliamentary-elections[40] Colleen Wood (Коллин Вуд), Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, октябрь 2020, https://twitter.com/colleenwood_/status/1313086167248760832?s=20[41] Бермет Талант, Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, октябрь 2020, https://twitter.com/ser_ou_parecer/status/1313195446463016963?s=20; Joanna Lillis (Джоанна Лиллис), Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, октябрь 2020, https://twitter.com/joannalillis/status/1313129376976953344?s=20[42] Bermet Talant, Twitter Post, Twitter, October 2020, https://twitter.com/ser_ou_parecer/status/1313234787029725186?s=20[43] Peter Leonard (Питер Леонард), Кыргызстанда таң атаары менен өкмөт имараттары протестчилердин көзөмөлүнө өткөн, Eurasianet, октябрь 2020, https://eurasianet.org/as-dawn-breaks-in-kyrgyzstan-protesters-control-government-buildings[44] Спорттук клубдарда машыккан жаш балдардын топтору социалдык тармактардын ролун аткарып, алар кездешкен учурлардын көбүндө уюшкан кылмыш топтор менен байланышта болгондору айтылууда.[45] Айзирек Иманалиева, Кыргызстан: Баатырлар аз болгон көтөрүлүштө, элдик кошуундагы ыктыярчылар жаркырашты, Eurasianet, октябрь 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-in-an-uprising-low-on-heroes-defense-volunteers-shine[46] Эрика Марат,  Кыргызстандын таң калаарлык бекемдиги, openDemocracy, октябрь 2020, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/incredible-resilience-kyrgyzstan/[47] RFE/RL’s Кыргыз Кызматы,  Кыргызстандын мыйзамчыгаруучулары түрмөдөн бошонуусунан бир нече күн өткөндөн кийин Жапаровду жаңы премьер-министр кылып дайындашты, RFE/RL, октябрь 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyz-japarov-new-prime-minister-political-turmoil-atambaev-arrest/30885681.html; DW (Deutsche Welle – немис эл аралык телерадиокомпаниясы), Кыргызстандын парламенти Жапаровду жаңы премьер-министр катары кабыл алды, октябрь 2020, https://www.dw.com/en/kyrgyzstans-parliament-taps-sadyr-zhaparov-as-new-premier/a-55270788; Адам укуктары боюнча эл аралык өнөктөштүгү (IPHR), Шайлоолордон кийинки протесттер Кыргызстанды каатчылыкка тушуктурууда, октябрь 2020, https://www.iphronline.org/post-election-protests-plunge-kyrgyzstan-into-crisis.html[48] Брюс Панниер, Кыргызстандагы маселелерди Жээнбеков чече албагандыгынан өз кызматынан кетти, RFE/RL, октябрь 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-jeenbekov-resignation-analysis-qishloq-ovozi/30896794.html[49] Питер Леонард, Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, октябрь 2020, https://twitter.com/Peter__Leonard/status/1313052691610951680?s=20; Kaktus Медиа, Толекан Исмаилова: Парламентке эч кандай үмүт жок, жер астына кирип кеткен президент элдин алдына чыгышы керек, октябрь 2020, https://kaktus.media/doc/423327_tolekan_ismailova:_na_parlament_nadejdy_net_prezident_doljen_vyyti_iz_podpolia.html; Аксана Исмаилбекова, Кыргызстандагы башаламандыктардын өзөгүндө жаткан муундар аралык келишпестик, The Diplomat, October 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/10/intergenerational-conflict-at-the-core-of-kyrgyzstans-turmoil/[50] Брюс Панниер,  Ири өзгөрүүлөрдү көздөгөн оппозициянын каалоосу Кыргызстандагы үчүнчү күчтөрдүн тарабынан уурдалышы, A Hidden Force In Kyrgyzstan Hijacks The Opposition’s Push For Big Changes, RFE/RL, October 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/a-hidden-force-in-kyrgyzstan-hijacks-the-opposition-s-push-for-big-changes/30891583.html[51] Темур Умаров,  Кыргызстандагы үчүнчү төңкөрүшкө ким жооп берет?, The Moscow Times (Москва шаарында жайгашкан эл аралык англис тилдүү онлайн гезити), октябрь 2020, https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2020/10/26/whos-in-charge-following-revolution-in-kyrgyzstan-a71856[52] Сэм Бутия, Кыргызстандын экономикасы жакшы темп менен өсүп келе жатканы айтылууда. Чын элеби?, Eurasianet, ноябрь 2019, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-says-its-economy-is-growing-at-a-healthy-clip-really#:~:text=The%20Kumtor%20mine%20alone%20contributed,remained%20stable%20in%20recent%20years.&text=Apart%20from%20depending%20on%20one,Kyrgyzstan's%20exports%20are%20not%20diversified[53] Заирбек Бактыбаев, Ак үйдүн алынышы алдын ала пландалган иш аракетпи? Азаттык Радиосу, октябрь 2012, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/kyrgyzstan_power_opposition/24736283.html; https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-nationalist-mps-and-rioters-attempt-to-storm-parliament[54] Дэвид Триллинг,  Кыргызстан: Улутчул депуттар менен козголоңчулардын өкмөттү басып алуу аракети, Eurasianet, октябрь 2012, https://cabar.asia/en/who-is-acting-president-of-kyrgyzstan-sadyr-zhaparov-here-s-the-explanation[55] RFE/RL’s Кыргыз кызматы, Күмтөрдү мамлекеттештирүүнү талап кылып чыккандардын кыргыз милициясы тарабынан кууп таркалышы, RFE/RL, октябрь 2013, https://www.rferl.org/a/kumtor-kyrgyzstan-gold-mine-hostage/25129053.html[56] Нуржамал Джанибекова, Кыргызстан: Оппозициячылдарга карата эки сот иши узак-мөөнөттүү өкүмдөр менен аяктады, Eurasianet, август 2017, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-two-opposition-trials-conclude-with-lengthy-sentences; Emilbek Kaptagaev, Facebook post, Facebook, August 2017, https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=728676047334502&id=100005763398264[57] Гулзат Баялиева жана Жолдон Кутманалиев,  Камакта отурган саясатчынын эс оодарылчу ылдамдыкта бийликке келишине социалдык тармактардын тийгизген таасирси, openDemocracy, October 2020, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/how-kyrgyz-social-media-backed-an-imprisoned-politicians-meteoric-rise-to-power/;  Гулзат Баялиева жана Жолдон Кутманалиев, Кыргызстандагы социалдык тармактарда орун алган жек көрүүчүлүккө көзөмөл жүргүзүлбөйт, openDemocracy, декабрь 2020, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/kyrgyzstan-social-media-hate-goes-unchecked/; Елена Короткова, “Абакта отуруп, төңкөрүш жасады.” «Коммерсантка» берген интервьюсунда Садыр Жапаровдун сүйлөгөн сөзу, Кloop, январь 2021, https://kloop.kg/blog/2021/01/11/sdelal-revolyutsiyu-iz-tyurmy-o-chem-rasskazal-sadyr-zhaparov-v-intervyu-kommersantu/[58] Асель Доолоткелдиева, Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, декабрь 2020, https://twitter.com/adoolotkeldieva/status/1342036354335715332?s=11; Форэйн Полиси Борбору (FPC), Мурунку Советтер Союзунун мамлекеттеринде либералдык эмес жарандык коомдун өсүшү, июль 2018, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/the-rise-of-illiberal-civil-society-in-the-former-soviet-union/[59] Юрий Копытин, Камчыбек Ташиев Улуттук коопсуздуктун мамлекеттик комитетинин төрага кызматына дайындалды, 24.kg, откябрь 2020, https://24.kg/english/169646_Kamchybek_Tashiev_appointed_Chairman_of_SCNS/[60] Оксана Гут, “Коррупционерлерди отургузбаш керек, анын ордуна уурдаганын кайра ордуна келтирүүсү жетишиүү болот”, vb.kg, октябрь 2020, https://www.vb.kg/doc/393327_korrypcionerov_ne_nado_sajat_v_turmy_dostatochno_vernyt_ykradennoe.html[61] Оксана Гут,  Макулдашуу боюнча Матраимовго айып пулу салынуусу күтүлүп, мамлекеттик кызматтарды иштөөгө 3 жылдык тыюу салынат, vb.kg, октябрь 2020, https://www.vb.kg/doc/393320_matraimova_po_soglasheniu_jdet_shtraf_i_zapret_zanimat_gosdoljnosti_3_goda.html; Radio Azattyk, УКМКнын кызматкерлери Матраимовдун жакын чөйрөсүнөн 40 чукул кишини анын коррупциондук схемаларына тийиштүү экендигин аныктап чыккан, октябрь 2020, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/30900569.html[62] RFE/RL’s Кыргыз кызматы,  Таасирдүү олигарх үй камагына алынгандан кийин президенттин милдетин аткаруучусу “Экономикалык мунапысты” жарыялады,  RFE/RL, октябрь 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-economic-amnesty-japarov-matraimov-house-arrest-oligarchs/30905101.html; Здравко Любас (Zdravko Ljubas), Кыргызстандагы жаңы бийлик пара берүүгө каршы чыгууда, Матраимов, OCCRP, октябрь 2020, https://www.occrp.org/en/daily/13272-new-kyrgyz-authorities-act-against-graft-matraimov?fbclid=IwAR20RcpzFEsE7Af_pFDWvvyus77DYUIfx5MyL1eKkiLBERmsQ5d5uw3nnlo[63] Камила Эшалиева, Чыныгы фэйктер: Кыргызстандагы троллдордун фабрикасы кантип иштейт, openDemocracy, ноябрь 2020, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/troll-factories-kyrgyzstan/?source=in-article-related-story; Kaktus Медиа, Матраимов жана Жапаров. Эки киши үчүн иштеген «троллдордун бир фабрикасы», февраль 2021, https://kaktus.media/doc/432331_matraimov_i_japarov._kogda_na_dvoih_odna_fabrika_trolley.html[64] RFE/RL, Бишкек шаарынын мурунку мэри коррупцияга шектелип, абакка алынды, июль 2013, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-bishkek-mayor-corruption/25060829.html; АКИпресс, Нариман Тюлеев Бишкектин мэрин милдетин аткаруучусу болду, октябрь 2020, https://akipress.com/news:649885:Nariman_Tuleev_became_acting_mayor_of_Bishkek/;  Kaktus Media, Twitter Post, Twitter, October 2020, https://twitter.com/kaktus__media/status/1318467547138789376. Бирок, 22-октябрда ал өз талапкерлигин алып салганf: Мария Орлова, Нариман Тюлеев кызматтан баш тартты. Бишкектин мэри: топтордун кир күрөшү, 24.kg, октябрь 2020, https://24.kg/vlast/170262_nariman_tyuleev_otkazalsya_otpostaio_mera_bishkeka_gryaznaya_borba_gruppirovok/[65] Өкмөт мүчөлөрү, Кыргызстан өкмөтү, https://www.gov.kg/ky/gov/s/103[66] Убактылуу президенттин каалоосуна ылайык Борбордук шайлоо комиссиясынын шайлоолорду кайрадан өткөрүү боюнча чечими соттор тарабына жокко чыгарылган.[67] Бермет Талант, Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, ноябрь 2020, https://twitter.com/ser_ou_parecer/status/1324370570507620352?s=20[68] Eurasianet, Кыргызстан: Парламенттеги орун алмашуулар Жапаровдун бийилигинин бекемделишине жол ачууда, ноябрь 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-parliament-reshuffle-paves-way-for-japarov-to-cement-power?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter[69] Бул жерде белгиленген Жогорку Кеңештин сайтында жайгаштырылган Баш мыйзамдын жаңы долбоору азыр башка, 2021-жылдын февраль айындагы каралып чыккан варианты менен алмаштырылган: Кыргыз Республикасынын Конституциясы жөнүндө" Кыргыз Республикасынын мыйзам долбоору боюнча референдумду (бүткүл элдик добуш берүүнү) дайындоо тууралуу”  Кыргыз Республикасынын мыйзам долбоору 2020-жылдын 17-ноябрынан тарта коомдук талкууга коюлат, ноябрь 2020, http://www.kenesh.kg/ru/article/show/7324/na-obshtestvennoe-obsuzhdenie-s-17-noyabrya-2020-goda-vinositsya-proekt-zakona-kirgizskoy-respubliki-o-naznachenii-referenduma-vsenarodnogo-golosovaniya-po-proektu-zakona-kirgizskoy-respubliki-o-konstitutsii-kirgizskoy-respubliki; Kaktus Медиа, Жогорку Кеңештин депутаттары референдум боюнча мыйзам долбоорун биринчи жана экинчи окуусунда кабыл алышты, декабрь 2020, https://kaktus.media/doc/427740_depytaty_jogorky_kenesha_priniali_zakonoproekt_o_referendyme_srazy_v_dvyh_chteniiah.html[70] Катэрина Путц, “Кыргызстандын “Ханституциясында” эмнелер сунушталган?”, The Diplomat, ноябрь 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/11/whats-in-kyrgyzstans-proposed-khanstitution/[71] Бул принциптерин Жапаров төмөнкү интервьюда белгилеген: Kaktus Медиа, Садыр Жапаров конституциялык реформанын долбоору даяр экенин айтты (видео), октябрь 2020, https://kaktus.media/doc/424039_sadyr_japarov_skazal_chto_y_nego_gotov_proekt_reformy_konstitycii_video.html[72]Айдай Токоева, “Президент өкмөттүн мыйзамдык жана юридикалык тармактарын талкалап жатат.” Өкмөттүн мурунку мүчөсү, Шер-Нияздын Баш мыйзамга киргизилчү өзгөртүүлөр боюнча пикири, Кloop, ноябрь 2020, https://kloop.kg/blog/2020/11/18/prezident-podminaet-pod-sebya-zakonodatelnuyu-i-sudebnuyu-vetvi-vlasti-eks-deputat-sher-niyaz-o-popravkah-v-konstitutsiyu/[73] Аби Гоял, Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, ноябрь 2020, https://twitter.com/goyal_abhi/status/1328780940777230340?s=21[74] RFE/RL's Кыргыз кызматы, “Конституциялык кеңешме реформаларды жүзөгө ашыруу үчүн түзүлөт” деп президенттин милдетин аткарган Жапаров айтты, RFE/RL, ноябрь 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/acting-kyrgyz-president-says-constitutional-council-will-be-established-to-implement-reforms/30927703.html;  Азаттык радиосу, Эдиль Байсалов Жогорку Кеңештин аталышын “Курултайга” же “Элдик Ассамблеясына” алмаштыруусун сунуштады, ноябрь 2020, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/30975946.html[75] Бектур Искендер, твиттердеги пост, ноябрь 2020, https://twitter.com/bektour/status/1332613244310200320; Human Rights Watch, Кыргызстан:  Баш мыйзамды карап чыгуунун ынтасыз иш аракети, ноябрь 2020, https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/11/21/kyrgyzstan-bad-faith-efforts-overhaul-constitution#; татьяна Кудрявцева, 2021-жылдын 10-январга коюлган өкмөттүн формасын тандоо боюнча референдуму, 24.kg, декабрь 2020, https://24.kg/english/176489_Referendum_on_form_of_government_scheduled_for_January_10_2021/[76] Адам укуктары жана демократиялык институттар боюнча Бюросу, 2021-жылы 10-январда мөөнөтүнөн мурун өтө түрчү президенттик шайлоо, ЕККУ, https://www.osce.org/odihr/elections/kyrgyzstan/473139[77] Шайлоочулардын маалыматтык системасы, https://newess.shailoo.gov.kg/en/[78] RFE/RL’s Kyrgyz Service, Парламент кабыл алагандан кийинки кыскартылган Министрлердин Кабинетинин ант берүүсү, RFE/RL, февраль 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyz-lawmakers-approve-new-government-/31084236.html[79] AFP (Agence France-Presse – француз маалымат агентствосу), Кыргыз коалициясы жаңы премьер-министрди сунуштады, Barron’s, февраль 2021, https://www.barrons.com/news/kyrgyz-coalition-puts-forward-new-pm-01612174805?tesla=y; Kaktus Медиа, Сурабалдиевасыз калган өкмөт. Улукбек Мариповтун сунуштаган өкмөттүн жаңы курамы, февраль 2021, https://kaktus.media/doc/431074_pravitelstvo_bez_syrabaldievoy._novyy_sostav_predlojennyy_ylykbekom_maripovym.html; Айзирек Иманалиева, Кыргызстан:  Парламент жаңы түзүлгөн жана тартипке келтирилген өкмөттү кабыл алды,  Eurasianet, февраль 2021, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-parliament-approves-new-streamlined-government[80] Kaktus Медиа, Сурабалдиевасыз калган өкмөт. Улукбек Мариповтун сунуштаган өкмөттүн жаңы курамы, февраль 2021, https://kaktus.media/doc/431074_pravitelstvo_bez_syrabaldievoy._novyy_sostav_predlojennyy_ylykbekom_maripovym.html[81] Гульмира Маканбай, Бишкектеги Улукбек Мариповдун премьер-министр кызматына дайындалышына каршы болуп өткөн митинги, 24.kg, февраль 2021, https://24.kg/english/182213_Rally_against_appointment_of_Ulukbek_Maripov_as_Prime_Minister_held_in_Bishkek/[82] Кыргыз Республикасынын Жогорку Кеңеши,  Кыргыз Республикасынын Баш мыйзамдын долбоору Жогорку Кеңештин расмий баракчасында жайгаштырылды, февраль 2021, http://kenesh.kg/ru/news/show/11009/proekt-konstitutsii-kirgizskoy-respubliki-razmeshten-na-ofitsialynom-sayte-zhogorku-kenesha; Конституциянын мыйзам долбоорунун жаңыланган варианты тиркелүүдө: Кыргыз Республикасынын Конституциясы жөнүндө "Кыргыз Республикасынын мыйзам долбоору боюнча референдумду (бүткүл элдик добуш берүүнү) дайындоо тууралуу” Кыргыз Республикасынын мыйзам долбоору 2020-жылдын 17-ноябрынан тарта коомдук талкууга коюлат”, November 2020, http://kenesh.kg/ru/article/show/7324/na-obshtestvennoe-obsuzhdenie-s-17-noyabrya-2020-goda-vinositsya-proekt-zakona-kirgizskoy-respubliki-o-naznachenii-referenduma-vsenarodnogo-golosovaniya-po-proektu-zakona-kirgizskoy-respubliki-o-konstitutsii-kirgizskoy-respubliki[83] “Адилет” юридикалык клиникасы, Кыргыз Республикасынын Конституциясынын мыйзам долбоорун талдоо, февраль 2021, https://adilet.kg/tpost/2i09a01nu1-analiz-proekta-konstitutsii-kirgizskoi-r[84] Бул мисалда Германиянын Негизги Мыйзамынын 5.2 беренесине шилтеме берилген. Сөз эркиндиги боюнча берене кошумча тактоо менен берилүүдө: “Бул укуктар Жалпы мыйзамдардын, жаш муунду коргоо жана адамдын жеке намысы боюнча жоболор менен чектелет”, Gesetze-im-internet.de, https://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_gg/englisch_gg.pdf[85] АКИпресс, Конституциялык референдум жана жергиликтүү шайлоолор 11-апрельге коюлду: Жапароов, февраль 2021, https://akipress.com/news:654513:Constitutional_referendum_and_local_elections_set_for_April_11__Japarov/[86] Крис Риклтон, Кыргызстан:  Тоо кең казуу сектору мыйзам чыгаруучулардын соккусуна даяр, Eurasianet, ноябрь 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-mining-sector-braces-for-regulatory-blow?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter[87]Канат Шаку, Чет өлкөлүк инвесторлордун Кыргызстандагы тоо кен казуу секторунун келечек долбоорлорго катышуусуна тыюу салынды, BNE News, February 2021, https://intellinews.com/foreign-investors-banned-from-future-mining-projects-in-kyrgyzstan-201724/[88] Дэйли Сабах (Daily Sabah), Түркия, Тоо кен казуу секторунда Кыргызстан кызматташтык боюнча алкактуу келишимге кол койду. Февраль 2021, https://www.dailysabah.com/business/energy/turkey-kyrgyzstan-to-sign-framework-deal-for-cooperation-in-mining[89] Георгий Мамедов,  “Жапаров биздин Трамп”: эмне үчүн Кыргызстан глобалдык саясаттын келечеги болуп саналат, openDemocracy, январь 2021, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/japarov-is-our-trump-kyrgyzstan-is-the-future-of-global-politics/; Эрика Марат, Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, январь 2021, https://twitter.com/Ericamarat/status/1348273098370519040; Токтосун Шамбетов, Кыргызстандын президенттигине талапкерлер мамлекетти башкаруунун кайсы формасын тандашат?, Азаттык Радиосу, декабрь 2020, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/31011983.html; «Экономист» (The Economist) гезити, Шайлоочулардын көпчүлүгүнүн добуштарына ээ болуп, Садыр Жапаров Кыргызстандын президенти болуп шайланды, январь 2021, https://www.economist.com/asia/2021/01/14/sadyr-japarov-is-elected-president-of-kyrgyzstan-in-a-landslide[90] Асель Доолоткельдиева, Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, январь 2021, https://twitter.com/ADoolotkeldieva/status/1348230029906489344?s=20[91] Асель Доолоткельдиева, Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, январь 2021, https://twitter.com/ADoolotkeldieva/status/1348312032337133569?s=20[92] Рыскелди Сатке,  Кыргызстанга берилген чет өлкөлүк жардамдын тескери жагы,  The Diplomat, June 2017, https://thediplomat.com/2017/06/the-downside-of-foreign-aid-in-kyrgyzstan/; Дүйнөлүк Банк, Кыргыз Республикасы, https://data.worldbank.org/country/KG[93]“Кландар” деп бир катар байкоочулар кимдерди сүрөттөйт: RFE/RL’s Service, OCCRP, Kloop, and Bellingcat, Кыргызстанда белгилүү үй-бүлөлүк кландын ойногон саясий оюну, RFE/RL, октябрь 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/30870040.html[94] Омурбек Ибраев,  Кыргызстандагы саясаттын баасы, WFD, сентябрь 2019, https://www.wfd.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Cost-of-Politics-Kyrgyzstan.pdf; Эрика Марат, Кыргызстандагы протесттердин коррупциялашкан криминалдарды саясаттан четтетүүдө натыйжасыздыгы, Форэйн Полиси (Foreign Policy), октябрь 2020, https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/10/22/kyrgyzstans-protests-wont-keep-corrupt-criminals-out-of-politics/[95] RFE/RL’s Кызматы, OCCRP, Kloop, жана Bellingcat, Матраимовдун империясы, RFE/RL, октябрь 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/the-matraimov-kingdom/30868683.html[96] БУУнун Кылмыштууулук жана баңгизат боюнча бөлүмү (UNODC), Түндүк маршруту менен  ооган апийимдин ташылышы, июнь  2018, https://www.unodc.org/rpanc/en/Sub-programme-4/afghan-opiate-trafficking-along-the-northern-route.html[97] Эл аралык SHADOW долбоору жүргүзгөн изилдөөнүн жыйынтыктарынын Бишкекте жарыяланышы, IBC Members’ News, декабрь 2020, http://ibc.kg/en/news/members/4807_results_of_a_research_of_the_international_shadow_project_presented_in_bishkek[98] Элеанор Бейшенбек, “Райым-миллиондун” ийгилигинин сыры, Азаттык Радиосу, август 2015, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/27215390.html[99] Али Токтакунов,  Кыргызстандан чыгарылып кеткен миллиондогон доллардын изине түшүү, Азаттык Радиосу, май 2019, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/29971887.html; OCCRP, RFE/RL, жана Kloop, 700 миллион АКШ долларга тете адам, RFE/RL, November 2019, https://www.rferl.org/a/the-700-million-man/30284812.html[100] OCCRP, RFE/RL, жана Kloop, Көмүскө каражаттардын жардамы менен курулган мүлктөрдүн империясы, OCCRP, декабрь 2019, https://www.occrp.org/en/plunder-and-patronage/a-real-estate-empire-built-on-dark-money[101] OCCRP, RFE/RL, Kloop, жана Bellingcat, “Аны өлтүрүү керек”: Кыргызстандагы акчаны чыгарып кетүү схемасын ачыктаган кишинин аркасынан жалганчы киллердин түшүшү, RFE/RL, ноябрь 2010, https://www.rferl.org/a/man-who-exposed-kyrgyz-smuggling-scheme-was-hunted-by-contract-killers/30940261.html[102] Нуржамал Джанибекова, Кыргызстан: Импровизацияланган митинг коррупцияга каршылыкты көрсөтүүнүн дагы бир ыкмасына шилтеме берүүдө, Eurasianet, ноябрь 2019, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-impromptu-rally-signals-new-way-of-opposing-corruption[103] RFE/RL’s Service, OCCRP, Kloop, жана Bellingcat, Матраимовдун империясы, RFE/RL, октябрь 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/the-matraimov-kingdom/30868683.html[104] OCCRP, RFE/RL’s Азаттык Радиосу, Kloop жана Bellingcat, “Кыргыз бажыдагы чиновниктин кооз жашоосу”, OCCRP, декабрь 2020, https://www.occrp.org/en/the-matraimov-kingdom/the-beautiful-life-of-a-kyrgyz-customs-official[105] OCCRP командасы, Ошентип, силердин репортаждарыңар уланып жаткан төңкөрүштүн факторуна айланды, эми эмне кыласыздар? Медиум, октябрь 2020, https://medium.com/occrp-unreported/so-your-reporting-became-a-factor-in-an-ongoing-revolution-what-do-you-do-next-54b993a11a39[106] Здравко Любас, Кыргыз өкмөтү Райымбек Матраимовду абакка киргизди, OCCRP, октябрь 2020, https://www.occrp.org/en/daily/13282-kyrgyz-authorities-arrest-matraimov-the-700-million-man[107] Настоящее время (Currenttime),  Кыргыз бажы кызматынын башчысынын мурунку орунбасары коррупция иши боюнча 6 миллион долларды мамлекеттик казынага төктү, ноябрь 2020, https://www.currenttime.tv/a/matraimov-kazna-6-mln/30956200.html; OCCRP, Кыргыз бажы кызматынын мурунку кызматкери паркорчулук айыбын моюнуна алып, 3000 долла айып пулун төлөөгө даяр, февраль 2021, https://www.occrp.org/en/daily/13850-kyrgyz-ex-customs-official-matraimov-pleads-guilty-to-graft-fined-3000; Оксана Гут, Макулдашуу боюнча Матраимовго айып пулу салынуусу күтүлүп, мамлекеттик кызматтарды иштөөгө 3 жылдык тыюу салынат Matraimova, according to the agreement, will be fined and banned from holding public office for 3 years, vb.kg, октябрь 2020, https://www.vb.kg/doc/393320_matraimova_po_soglasheniu_jdet_shtraf_i_zapret_zanimat_gosdoljnosti_3_goda.html; Азаттык Радиосу, Radio Azattyk,Матраимов Бажы кызматында коррупциялык схемалдарды түзгөнүн моюна алды. Ага карата сот 260 миң сом өлчөмүндө айып пулун төлөө өкүмүн чыгарган, февраль 2021, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/31097620.html[108] RFE/RL’s Кыргыз кызматы, Кыргыз активисттери коррупцияга каршы митингге чыгууда, RFE/RL, февраль 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyz-activists-rally-against-corruption/31102170.html[109] Катэрина Путц,  Кыргызстандагы Бажы кызматынын мурунку кызматкери Матраиомв кайрадан камакка алынды, The Diplomat, февраль 2021, https://thediplomat.com/2021/02/in-kyrgyzstan-controversial-former-customs-official-matraimov-rearrested/; Катэрина Путц,  Акчаны адалдоо жана өлкөдөн чыгаруу боюнча козгологон иши уланып, Матраимов сотко чейин абакка киргизилди, The Diplomat, февраль 2021, https://thediplomat.com/2021/02/matraimov-placed-in-pretrial-detention-as-money-laundering-investigation-moves-ahead/[110] АКШнын Казына департаменти, Казына департаменти Африка менен Азиядагы коррупционерлерге карата санкцияларды таңуулады, декабрь 2020, https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm1206[111] Лидия Осборн, Камчыбек Кольбаев, OCCRP, июнь 2018, https://www.occrp.org/en/goldensands/profiles/kamchybek-kolbayev[112] RFE/RL’s Кыргыз кызматы, Белгилүү крим төбөл түрмөдөн чыгат, RFE/RL, май 2014, https://www.rferl.org/a/reputed-kyrgyz-crime-boss-to-be-released-from-prison/25389844.html[113] RFE/RL’s Кыргыз кызматы, OCCRP, Kloop, жана Bellingcat,  Кольбаевдин байланыштары, RFE/RL, December 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/matraimov-kolbaev-kyrgyzstan-corruption/30996468.html[114] RFE/RL’s Кыргыз кызматы, Белгилүү кримтөбөл Бишкекте кармалды, RFE/RL, октябрь 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/notorious-kyrgyz-crime-boss-detained-in-bishkek/30906562.html[115] Крис Риклтон жана Бекполот Ибраимов, Кыргызстан: Саясий аренада абал курчаганда көшөгөнүн артына бекинген, Eurasianet,  июль 2019, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-kingmaker-lurks-behind-curtain-as-politics-heat-up[116]Эрика Марат Erica Marat, Кыргызстандагы протесттердин коррупциялашкан криминалдарды саясаттан четтетүүдө натыйжасыздыгы,Форэйн Полиси (Foreign Policy), октябрь 2020, https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/10/22/kyrgyzstans-protests-wont-keep-corrupt-criminals-out-of-politics/[117] Сара Чейз, Коррупциянын түзүмү: Евразиялык өлкөлөрдүн мисалында системалык талддоо (анализ), Карнеги эндоумент (Carnegie Endowment), июнь 2016, https://carnegieendowment.org/files/CP274_Chayes_EurasianCorruptionStructure_final1.pdf[118] “Ачык өкмөт” өнөктөштүгү (Open Government Partnership), Кыргыз Республикасы, 2017-жылы “Ачык өкмөт” демилгесине мүчө болгон, Иш-аракет плаы 1, https://www.opengovpartnership.org/members/kyrgyz-republic/[119] Юрий Копытин,  Кадырбек Досонов кримтөбөлдүн Ош шаарынан Биишкек шаарына жеткизилиши,  24.kg, февраль 2021, https://24.kg/english/183136_Crime_boss_Kadyrbek_Dosonov_brought_to_Bishkek_from_Osh_city/; Kloop, Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, февраль 2021, https://twitter.com/kloopnews/status/1361950547486646274?s=20[120] Ошондой эле “империялык жана советтик доордо көчүп келген орустар” деген аталышка этникалык казактар дагы кирген.[121] Алишер Хамидов,  Этника аралык чыңалуунун өрчүшү Кыргызстандын түштүк аймагын тынчсыздандырууда, Refworld, ноябрь 2002, https://www.refworld.org/docid/46cc322dc.html[122] Эрика Марат,  Оштогу каргашалуу окуялардын улуттук иликтөөсүнун жыйынтыгы аз болууда, Refworld, январь 2011, https://www.refworld.org/docid/4d469cb52.html; Human Rights Watch, “Адилеттик кайсыл жерде?” Кыргызстандын түштугүндөгү кайгылуу окуялар жана анын кесепеттери, август  2010, https://www.hrw.org/report/2010/08/16/where-justice/interethnic-violence-southern-kyrgyzstan-and-its-aftermath[123]  ЕККУнун улуттук азчылыктар боюнча Жогорку Комиссииясы,  “Кыргызстан боюнча билдирүү”, Вена, 6-май 2010, www.osce.org/documents/hcnm/2010/05/45132_en.pdf[124] Эрика Марат,  Оштогу каргашалуу окуялардын улуттук иликтөөсүнун жыйынтыгы аз болууда, Refworld, январь 2011, https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/Full_Report_490.pdf[125] Тодар Прусс,  Кыргызстандын борбор шаарында кыргыз тилинде сүйлөө укугу үчүн күрөш, Оксус коому (The Oxus Society), ноябрь 2020, https://oxussociety.org/the-fight-for-the-right-to-speak-kyrgyz-in-kyrgyzstans-capital/[126] АКИпресс,  Кыргызстандын Баш мыйзам долбоорунда орус тилинин “расмий тил” статусу сакталып калды, ноябрь 2020, https://akipress.com/news:651503:Russian_language_kept_as_official_language_in_draft_of_Constitution_of_Kyrgyzstan/[127] Форэйн Полиси Центр (FPC), Начар тажрыйба менен бөлүшүү: Мурунку Советтик Союздагы мамлекеттер жана институттар репрессиянын расмий ыкмаларын иштеп чыгууга көрсөткөн жардамы, май 2016, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/sharingworstpractice/[128] Адам Хьюдж, Киришүү: Либералдык эмес жарандык коом өсүүдөбү? Форэйн Полиси Центр (FPC), July 2018, https://fpc.org.uk/introduction-the-rise-of-illiberal-civil-society/; Асылай Акишева, Кыргызстандагы “Келинизм”: Аял укуктары менен салттуу баалуулуктар, Оксус коому (The Oxus Society), январь 2021, https://oxussociety.org/kelinism-in-kyrgyzstan-womens-rights-versus-traditional-values/[129] Улуттук демократиялык институту (NDI-National Democratic Institute), Кыргызстан парламентинин аял-мүчөлөрүнүн форуму үй-бүлөлүк зомбулук менен күрөштү баштоодо, май 2020, https://www.ndi.org/our-stories/forum-women-members-parliament-kyrgyzstan-takes-domestic-violence[130] “Икуэл райтс траст” (The Equal Rights Trust-көз карандысыз эл аралык уюму), Кыргызстан, март 2018, https://www.equalrightstrust.org/sites/default/files/ertdocs/180330%20ERT%20Submission%20to%20CERD%20on%20Kyrgyzstan%20REVISED.pdf; ЕКОМ жаңылыктары, ЕКОМ, “Кыргыз индиго” коомдук уюму жана “Лабрис” ЛГБТ уюму БУУнун Адам укуктары боюнча Комитетине Кыргызстанда ЛГБТ коому үчүн антидискриминациялык мыйзамдардын жоктугу тууралуу билдирүү жасашты, август 2020, https://ecom.ngo/en/kyrgyzstan-unhrc/[131] Валерия Карди,  Бийликтеги аялдар: Кыргызстан парламентинин эң жаш аял өкүлү ала-качуу маселеси менен аялдарга карата жасалган зомбулукту көңүлдүн чордонуна коюууда, Reuters, октябрь 2017, https://www.reuters.com/article/us-women-rulers-kyrgyzstan-idUSKBN1CU01Q[132] Лабрис программалары, https://www.labrys.kg/; Пит Баумгартнер, Түстүү кыжыр:Борбордук Азияда биринчи жолу болуп өткөн “Гей-параддан” кийин Кыргызстан ЛГБТ коомчулугуна каршы чыгууда, RFE/RL, март 2019, https://www.rferl.org/a/rainbow-rage-kyrgyz-rail-against-lgbt-after-central-asia-s-first-gay-pride-march/29825158.html[133] Кэйт Арнольд, Абалдын начарлануусунун жыйынтыгында Бишкектеги жалгыз ЛГБТ клубдун эшиги жабылды, RFE/RL, июнь 2017, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-lgbt-club-closing-gay-rights-homophobia/28561339.html[134] RFE/RL’s Кыргыз кызматы, Кыргыз шайлоочулар Конституцияга бир жыныстуу никелерге тыюу салган өзгөртүүлөрдү кайтарууну колдошту, RFE/RL, декабрь 2016, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-constitutional-referendum-voting/28168872.html[135] Хаерпфер С., Инглхарт Р., Морено А., Вельцель С., Кизилова К., Диез-Медрано Ж, М. Лагос, П. Норрис, Е. Понарин жана Б. Пуранен жана башшкалар (редакторлор). 2020. Дүйнөлүк баалуулуктар боюнча изилдөө борбору (World Values Survey): 7-айлампа - Өлкөлөр боюнча файлдагы берилиштер, Мадрид, Испания жана Вена, Австрия: JD Systems Institute & WVSA Secretariat. doi.org/10.14281/18241.1 https://www.worldvaluessurvey.org/WVSDocumentationWV7.jsp[136] Рыскелди Сатке,  Кыргызстандагы либералдык эмес күчтөрдүн айынан аялдардын укуктары коркунучка кабылууда,  Illiberal forces put women’s rights under strain in Kyrgyzstan, Foreign Policy Centre, July 2018, https://fpc.org.uk/illiberal-forces-put-womens-rights-under-strain-in-kyrgyzstan/[137] Асель Сооронбаева, Кыргызстан: Ийгиликке жетүү үчүн хиджаб тоскоол эмес, КАБАР, февраль 2019, https://cabar.asia/en/kyrgyzstan-hijab-not-an-obstacle-to-success[138]жогорудагы шилтеме[139] Европа Баптист федерациясы, (EBF) жана Дүйнөлүк баптист альянсы,  Универсалдык мезгилдик серептин 35-отурумуКыргыз Республикасы, дин туткандын жана диний эркиндик боюнча доклад,  https://uprdoc.ohchr.org/uprweb/downloadfile.aspx?filename=7401&file=EnglishTranslation[140] Конституция, 2016-жылга чейин киргизилген өзгөртүүлөрдү камтыган 2010-жылкы Кыргыз Республикасынын Баш мыйзамы, https://www.constituteproject.org/constitution/Kyrgyz_Republic_2016.pdf?lang=en[141] Жарандык коомдун жыйынтык маалыматы (Civil Society Briefs), Кыргыз коому, ноябрь 2011, https://www.adb.org/sites/default/files/publication/29443/csb-kgz.pdf[142] Айзирек Иманалиева, Кыргызстан: Баш мыйзам долбоору бейөкмөт уюмдарды дубалга такоо коркунучун чагылдырууда, Eurasianet, май 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-draft-bill-threatens-to-drive-ngos-against-the-wall; Жарандык тилектештик, Жарандык тилектештик платформасынын Кыргызстандагы уюмдарга карата көзөмөлдүн жана отчеттулуктун кошумча талаптарын Баш мыйзам долбооруна киргизүү сунушу боюнча билдирүүсү,февраль 2020,https://www.civicsolidarity.org/article/1644/civic-solidarity-platform-statement-legislative-proposals-impose-excessive-reporting[143] Labour Start Campaigns, Кыргызстан: Профсоюздарга басым жасоону токтоткула, https://www.labourstartcampaigns.net/show_campaign.cgi?c=4639[144] Human Rights Watch, Кыргызстан: Профсоюздардын иштерине кийилигишүүнүн өсүшү, декабрь 2020, https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/12/23/kyrgyzstan-increased-interference-trade-union-activities[145] Асель Доолоткельдиева, Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, декабрь 2020, https://twitter.com/ADoolotkeldieva/status/1336708028859604993?s=20[146] Анара Мусабаева,  Кыргызстандагы социалдык тармактарга багытталган бейөкмөт уюмдардын жоопкерчилиги, ачык-айкындыгы жана мыйзамдуулугу, INTRAC, январь 2013, https://www.intrac.org/wpcms/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Briefing-Paper-34-Responsibility-transparency-and-legitimacy-of-socially-oriented-NGOs-in-Kyrgyzstan.pdf[147] Айзирек Иманалиева, Кыргызстан: Баш мыйзамдын манипуляциялоосуна жүздөгөн киши каршы чыкты, Eurasianet, ноябрь 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-hundreds-rally-against-constitutional-tinkering; Айдай Токоева,  “Ханституцияга жол жок.” Бишкекте өлкөнүн Баш мыйзамына киргизилчү өзгөртүүлөргө каршы тынч маршы өтөт, Кloop, ноябрь 2020, https://kloop.kg/blog/2020/11/18/net-hanstitutsii-v-bishkeke-projdet-mirnyj-marsh-protiv-popravok-v-osnovnoj-zakon-strany/[148] Дүйнө боюнча ММКлардын редакция саясаты таасири чоң ММКлардын ээлеринин саясий көз карштарынан көз каранды, бирок бул көрүнүш кээ бир басмаканалар сындаган ишке байланыштуу  бир жолку мүнөзгө ээ. Мындвй басмаканалар компаниядын сырткы демөөрчүлөр тарабынан түзүлүшү мүмкүн.[149] ARTICLE 19, Кыргызстан: “Маалыматты манипуляциялоо” боюнча мыйзамына вето коюлушу керек, июль 2020, https://www.article19.org/resources/kyrgyzstan-law-on-manipulating-information-must-be-vetoed/[150] Дарья Подольская,  Депутаттар “Маалыматты манипуляциялоо тууралуу” чуулуу мыйзамды түртүп өткөрүүнү көздөөдө,  24.kg, декабрь 2020, https://24.kg/vlast/176430_deputatyi_hotyat_protaschit_skandalnyiy_zakon_omanipulirovanii_informatsiey/?fbclid=IwAR0USXJ0RVvpRQ16pFIUph8qUUew9XpJIl0DygCNNCqN5LCZjJkZTlt-1nk[151] Айзирек Иманалиева, Кыргызстан: Сезимтал бийлик өкүлдөрү комментаторлорду суракка чакырууда, Eurasianet, August 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-thin-skinned-authorities-hauling-in-commentators-for-questioning[152] CPJ, Кыргызстандагы шайлоолордон кийин жана алардын учурунда да журналисттерге кол салынып, жүргузгөн иштерине бут тосуулар болгон, октябрь 2020, https://cpj.org/2020/10/journalists-attacked-obstructed-during-and-after-parliamentary-elections-in-kyrgyzstan/[153] Борбордук Азиянын массалык маалымат каражаттарынан негизги учурлар, вебсайт 12 январь 21, BBC дүйнөлүк мониторинг бөлүмүнүн алкагындагы BBC Борбордук Азиядагы мониторинг бөлүмү, январь 2021, https://advance-lexis-com.mutex.gmu.edu/api/document?collection=news&id=urn:contentItem:61RP-B2W1-JC8S-C51G-00000-00&context=1516831; Айдай Токоева, “Оппозиция тарапты биригүүгө чакырмакмын, азчылык көпчүлүккө баш ийүүсү керек0”--Жапаров, KLOOP.KG - Новости Кыргызстана (блог), январь 2021, https://kloop.kg/blog/2021/01/10/ya-prizyvayu-opponentov-obedinitsya-menshinstvo-dolzhno-podchinitsya-bolshinstvu-zhaparov/[154] Глобалдык массалык маалымат каражаттары боюнча АКШ Агенттиги, RFE/RL Кыргыз кызматындагы иликтөө-репортеру өлүм коркутуу-үркүтүүгө дуушар болду, апрель 2020, https://www.usagm.gov/2020/04/07/rfe-rl-kyrgyz-service-investigative-reporter-receives-death-threat/[155] Айзирек Иманалиева, Кыргызстандын жаңы жетекчиси эркин маалымат каражаттарын каралоодо, Eurasianet, ноябрь 2020, https://eurasianet.org/new-kyrgyzstan-leader-vilifying-free-press?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook&fbclid=IwAR0qz5Pn_RxN7mB_5N6_gqZoqQIYTf_-ulT_QEgD8LWasQVMs4pu1htj90s; Пол Бартлет, Президенттик шайлоолорун Жапаров жеңгенден кийин Кыргызстандагы массалык маалымат каражаттарынын күңүрт келечеги, The Moscow Times, январь 2021, https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2021/01/13/bleak-outlook-for-kyrgyzstans-free-press-after-japarovs-landslide-win-in-presidential-poll-a72594[156] Камила Эшалиева Kamila Eshaliyeva, Чыныгы фэйктер: Кыргызстандагы троллдордун фабрикасы кантип иштейт, openDemocracy, November 2020, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/troll-factories-kyrgyzstan/[157] Эльвира Калмурзаева, Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, ноябрь 2020, https://twitter.com/Ekalmurzaeva/status/1330107952271937536?s=20[158] Бакыт Торегельди, Социалдык тармактардын кыргыз тилдүү бөлүгундөгү коркутуп-үркүтүүлөр, Азаттык Радиосу, ноябрь 2020, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/30964989.html?fbclid=IwAR1JsYHLQsdksWN73HibIdJ1tI-gn0EM4e30gKpxDPCi558ibuJRpGitNwQ[159] Ар кандай контексттеги “Ишенемдүү өнөктөштөрдүн” схемасынын өрнөгү:   An example of the Trusted Partner scheme in a different context: Адам укуктары боюнча Европалык фонду (EFHR - The European Foundation of Human Rights), Адам укуктары боюнча Европалык фонду Фэйсбуктун “Ишенимдүү өнөктөштөрдүн” каналына кошулду, январь 2018, https://en.efhr.eu/2018/01/29/efhr-welcomed-trusted-partner-channel-facebook/[160] Юридикалык клиника “Адилет”: https://adilet.kg/[161] Кыргыз Республикасынын Жогорку Кеңеши, Кыргыз Республикасынын Конституциясы жөнүндө"Кыргыз Республикасынын мыйзам долбоору боюнча референдумду (бүткүл элдик добуш берүүнү) дайындоо тууралуу”  Кыргыз Республикасынын мыйзам долбоору 2020-жылдын 17-ноябрынан тарта коомдук талкууга коюлат, ноябрь 2020, http://www.kenesh.kg/ru/article/show/7324/na-obshtestvennoe-obsuzhdenie-s-17-noyabrya-2020-goda-vinositsya-proekt-zakona-kirgizskoy-respubliki-o-naznachenii-referenduma-vsenarodnogo-golosovaniya-po-proektu-zakona-kirgizskoy-respubliki-o-konstitutsii-kirgizskoy-respubliki (As revised in Febrаuary 2021)[162] “Адилет”, отчет: “Кыргыз Республикасынын адвокатура менен адвокаттары аңдуулар менен сырткы үркүтүүлөргө кабылып, соккунун алдында калууда, март 2020, https://adilet.kg/tpost/2i09a01nu1-analiz-proekta-konstitutsii-kirgizskoi-r[163] Юридикалык клиника “Адилет”, Кыргыз Республикасынын Баш мыйзам долбоорунун талдоосу,  февраль 2021, https://adilet.kg/tpost/escvd3gcr1-doklad-advokatura-i-advokati-kirgizskoi; Кыргыз Республикасындагы адвокатура: http://advokatura.kg/; Кыргыз Республикасынын мамлекеттик ишкананын расмий баракчасы: https://new.prokuror.kg/ru[164] Американын адвокатура ассоциациясы (ABA), Сот ишинин үстунөн жүргүзүлгөн байкоо боюнча отчет: Кыргызстан жана Гульжан Пасанова, май 2020, https://www.americanbar.org/groups/human_rights/reports/kyrgyzstan_vs_Gulzhan_Pasanova1/[165] Автор менен маек жана бир мисал: Eurasianet, Кыргызстан: Аскаровдун өлүмү боюнча элдин жини ошол бойдон маанисиз болуп калабы?, июль 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-will-fury-around-askarov-death-end-up-signifying-nothing[166] Human Rights Watch, Кыргызстан – 2018-жылдын окуялары,  https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2019/country-chapters/kyrgyzstan#e81181[167] ЮриспПруденция, https://juris.ohchr.org/search/results[168] Human Rights Watch, Универсалдуу мезгилдик серептин жыйынтыктарын кабыл алуу,  Кыргызстандын сереби, сентябрь 2020, https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/09/28/adoption-outcome-universal-periodic-review-kyrgyzstan. Мисалы, Орусия адам укуктары боюнча Европа сотунун(ECtHR) чечимдерине өзүнүн сотторунун үстөмдүгүн көрсөтүүчү конституциялык өзгөртүүлөрду кабыл алды, Трамптын администрациясы америкалык аскерий кызмат өтөгөндөрдүн потенциалдуу кылмыштарын тергеген Эл аралык кылмыш сотунун судьяларына карата эл аралык санкцияларын киргизген. Ал эми Улуу Британия болсо Адам укуктары боюнча Европа конвенцияны жумшагыраак колдонуусун билбей, же Адам укуктар боюнча Европа сотунун карамагынан чыгышын билбей, бул маселелер акыркы он жыл бою таалкуулоолордун астында жаткан.[169] Фронт Лайн Дифендерс (Front Line Defenders - укук коргоочуларды коргогон эл аралык фонду), Азимжан Аскаров өкмөттү сотко берди, https://www.frontlinedefenders.org/en/case/azimjan-askarov-brings-lawsuit-against-government[170] Каржы, учет жана аудит жаатында бириктирген кесипкөй адамдардын ассоциациясы (ACCA - Association of Chartered Certified Accountants),Кыргызстанда камакка киргизилгендердин ар бир бешинчиси кыйноо учурларына арызданууда, январь 2020, https://acca.media/en/in-kyrgyzstan-every-fifth-detainee-complains-of-torture/[171] Фронт Лайн Дифендерс (Front Line Defenders), #Kyrgyzstan, https://www.frontlinedefenders.org/en/location/kyrgyzstan[172] Хью Вильямсон, Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, December 2020, https://twitter.com/HughAWilliamson/status/1333784559314354177?s=20[173] RFE/RL, Кыргызстан экстрадициялаган өзбек журналисттин тагдыры боюнча АКШ нын тынчсыздануусу, сентябрь 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/u-s-concerned-over-fate-of-uzbek-journalist-extradited-by-kyrgyzstan/30824802.html[174] Лира Сагынбекова, Евразия экономикалык бирикменин алкагындагы эл аралык эмгек миграциясы: Орусиядагы кыргыз мигранттардын маселелери жана көйгөйлөрү, Борбордук Азия университети, 39 номерлүү иш документи,  2017, https://www.ucentralasia.org/Content/Downloads/UCA-IPPA-WP-39%20International%20Labour%20Migration_ENG.pdf[175] Рыскелди Сатке, Твиттердеги пост, Twitter, февраль 2021, https://twitter.com/RyskeldiSatke/status/1357704117418885121?s=20[176] Крис Риклтон, Твитттердеги пост, Twitter, ноябрь 2020, https://twitter.com/ChrisRickleton/status/1326397172053643266?s=20; TASS, Путин Жапаровду президенттик шайлоолордун жеңиши менен куттуктады, январь 2021, https://tass.com/politics/1243317[177] Дирк ван дэр Клей, Ковид менен Кыргызстан жана Таджикистандын тышкы карыздарынын жаңы динамикасы, Eurasianet, октябрь 2020, https://eurasianet.org/covid-and-the-new-debt-dynamics-of-kyrgyzstan-and-tajikistan; Крис Риклтон, Кыргызстандын Кытайга болгон карызы: Кескин үнөмдөө менен краудфандингдин ортосунда калуу, Eurasianet, ноябрь 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstans-china-debt-between-crowdfunding-and-austerity[178] Нива Яу,  Кытай ишкерлиги боюнча кыскача баяндама: Кыргызстандагы абалы менен нааразыбыз, Eurasianet, ноябрь 2020, https://eurasianet.org/china-business-briefing-not-happy-with-kyrgyzstan; Eurasianet, Негизги инфратүзүмдөрдү куруу боюнча Кыргызстандын Кытайга көбурөөк жардам берүү өтүнүчү  Kyrgyzstan pleads for more Chinese help in building key infrastructure, December 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-pleads-for-more-chinese-help-in-building-key-infrastructure; Темур Умаров,  Кооптуу байланыштар: Борбордук Азия элиталарынын Кытай тарабынан жоошутулушу,Карнеги Москва борбору (Carnegie Moscow Center), январь 2021, https://carnegie.ru/commentary/83756[179] Европа Коммиссиясы, Европа Биримдиги менен Кыргыз Республикасынын ортосундагы кеңейтилген өнөктөштүк жана кызматташтык боюнча алгачкы макулдашуусу, июль 2019, http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/press/index.cfm?id=2046#:~:text=On%206%20July%202019%2C%20the,Asia%20Ministerial%20Meeting%2C%20in%20Bishkek.&text=The%20seventh%20and%20final%20negotiating,on%206%2D8%20June%202019[180] Бул жыйындын киришүү жана корутунду бөлүктөрүндө камтылган мүмкүн болгон сунуштамалардын тизмеси.[181] Европа Комиссиясы, Реципиенттер (бюджетти кабыл алуучулар), https://euaidexplorer.ec.europa.eu/content/explore/recipients_en[182] Европа Тышкы иштер Кызматы (EEAS), Кыргыз Республикасы жана Европа Биримдиги, октябрь 2020, https://eeas.europa.eu/delegations/kyrgyz-republic/1397/kyrgyz-republic-and-eu_en[183] Татьяна Кудрявцева,  Германия Кыргызстан менен кызматташтыгын кыскартуусу тууралуу билдирүү жасады, 24.kg, май 2020, https://24.kg/english/152054_Germany_announces_reduction_in_cooperation_with_Kyrgyzstan/; Кызматташтык менен экономикалык өнүктүрүүнүн Федералдык министрлиги (BMZ), BMZнын 2030-жылга чейинки стратегиялык реформасы: Жаңы ой-жүгүртүү - жаңы багыт,  https://www.bmz.de/en/publications/type_of_publication/information_flyer/information_brochures/Materilie520_reform_strategy.pdf[184] Тышкы жардам, Кыргызстан, https://foreignassistance.gov/explore/country/Kyrgyzstan; Маалыматты USAID уюмунун көз карашы менен кабыл алуу, өлкө боюнча Американын Кошмо Штаттардын тарабынан көрсөтүлгөн тышкы жардам, https://explorer.usaid.gov/cd/KGZ?measure=Obligations&fiscal_year=2020 - негизиги бенефициарлар АКШнын  өнүктүрүү жана саламаттыкты сактоонун FHI 360 (Family Health International - Эл аралык үй-бүлө саламаттыгынын) бейөкмөт уюму, Өнүктүрүү боюнча “Chemonics” консалтинг фирмасы жана Джон Сноу Интэрнэшинал (John Snow International) аттуу фирмасынын саламаттык сактоо системасындагы конультанттар болгону көрүнүүдө. Өнөктөштөрдүн биринчи ондугуна АКШга таандык болгон фирмалар, бейөкмөт уюмдар жана өкмөт мекемелери кирген.[185] Development Tracker, Кыргызстан, Тышкы иштердин, Британиялык улуттардын шериктештигинин жана өнүктүрүү боюнча министрлиги  (FCDO-Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office), https://devtracker.fcdo.gov.uk/countries/KG [post_title] => Кыргызстанда адам укуктарына жасалган басымды изилдөө  [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => %d0%ba%d1%8b%d1%80%d0%b3%d1%8b%d0%b7%d1%81%d1%82%d0%b0%d0%bd%d0%b4%d0%b0-%d0%b0%d0%b4%d0%b0%d0%bc-%d1%83%d0%ba%d1%83%d0%ba%d1%82%d0%b0%d1%80%d1%8b%d0%bd%d0%b0-%d0%b6%d0%b0%d1%81%d0%b0%d0%bb%d0%b3 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-09 12:40:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-09 11:40:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://fpc.org.uk/?p=5845 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )[5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5954 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2021-06-29 11:59:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-06-29 10:59:01 [post_content] => “Күчү жоголуп бараткан укуктар” аттуу басылма бүгүнкү күндө Кыргызстан дуушар болуп жаткан маселелердин масштабын көрсөтүү далалатын ишке ашырды. Саясий аренадагы болуп жаткан окуялар Кыргызстан элине  бир эле “кинону” кайталап көрсөтүп жаткандай сезилүүдө  – тез жана баш аламан өзгөрүүлөрдүн алкагында жаңы жетекчилер чоң убадалар менен келип, бирок мурункулардын жасаган каталарын кайталап эле, мындай кубулуш өз алдынча кийинки кайгылуу өзгөрүүлөргө алып келүүдө. Жапаров мурунку саясатчылардын жолуна түшөр түшпөстүгү учурдагы негизги маселе болуп турат.  2020-жылдын октябрь окуяларынан кийин кээ бир маселелер өрчүп кеткенине карабастан, Кыргызстандын көйгөйлөрүнүн басымдуулугу көп жылдардын ичинде түптөлүп, аларын өзөгүндө өз ара байланышып, бири бирин күчөткөн үч маселе жатат: коррупция, жек көрүүчүлүк жана жазасыздык. Бул үч көйгөйдү чечүүгө жардам берүүнү каалагандар үчүн көптөгөн суроолор жаралышы мүмкүн.[1] Кыргызстан менен иштешкен Батыш өкмөттөрү өлкөдөгү мамлекеттик мекемелердин маселелерине көз жумган эмес, бирок кээ бир учурларда аларды кичирейтип көрсөтүлушүндө кандайдыр бир деңгээлде күнөөсү бардыр. Акыркы убакта адам укуктары жаатында болгон коркунучтуу көрсөткүчтөрү боюнча Кыргызстанды Борбордук Азиянын башка мамлекеттери  менен салыштыруу тенденциясы тузүлүп калган. Анын ордуна Кыргызстанды өзүнүн жетишкендитери менен салыштыруу оң болмок, анткени жогоруда белгиленген маселелерге карата көрүлгөн чаралардын маанилүүлүгү басаңдап калган. Дүрбөлөңдү алдын алуу менен, учурда түзүлүп калган кырдаалды так баамдоого убакыт келип, “терең кабатырланууну” иш-аракеттерге айландыруу максатында мурунку ыкмаларынын жетишкендиктерин (же анын жоктугун) изилдөөгө тийиш. Албетте, чечүүнүн ыңгайлуу жолун сунуштаганга караганда көйгөйдү сыртынан белгилеп коюу алда канча жеңил. Буга карабастан, жыйындын көптөгөн авторлору Кыргызстандагы эл аралык уюмдардын катышуусунун бир нече мүмкүн болгон жолдорун аныктап берүү аракетин жасашты. Корутунду бөлүгү берилген сунуштамаларды ыраатка келтирип, кээ бирлерин кошумчалаганга умтулат. Батыш донорлор көздөгөн максаттарына жана аларды ишке ашырууда колдонулуучу механизмдерине байланыштуу маселелер концептуалдык жана практикалык мүнөзгө ээ. Коомдук жашоонун бардык бөлүктөрүнө жана мамлекеттик тейлөөгө тоскоолдукту жараткан коорупциянын жергиликтүү деңгээли октябрдагы бийликтин кыйрашына жана анын кайрадан түзүлүшүнө алып келген. Буларды жана кыргыз мамлекетинин пандемиянын учурундагы ийгиликсиз иш-аракеттерин эске алуу менен, өкмөттүк министрликтердин, мамлекеттик мекемелердин жана Жогорку Кеңештин (Парламенттин) потенциалын жогорулатууга багытталган долбоорлорду кайрадан карап чыгууга болгон муктаждыгы зарыл болууда. Эл аралык донорлордун колдоосунун (өзгөчө Европа Биримдиги) орчундуу бөлүгү түздөн-түз бюджеттик колдоо түрүндө өкмөткө багытталган.[2]  Өкмөт менен донорлордун ортосундагы ишенимдүү мамилелердин алкагында бюджеттик колдоонун пайдасына карата жергиликтүү жоопкерчилик менен потенциалды бекемдөөнүн маанилүү аргументтери бар. Бирок, жогоруда айтылган мекемелердеги (донорлор тарабынан каржыланган иштер кылдаттык менен көзөмөлдөнгөн учурда дагы, мындай долбоорлор каржылоонун башка булактарын сүрүп чыгарып, пайдасы аз башка максаттарга жумшалышы ыктымал) коррупциянын туруктуу деңгээлин, Кыргызстан жарандарына берилген отчетторунун жетишсиздиги жана ар түрдүү схемалардын өзгөрмө натыйжаларын эске алуу менен учурда колдонулуп жаткан ыкмаларды карап чыгууга себептер бар.[3] Биргеликте жүргүзүлгөн долбоорлордун жыйынтыктарын баамдоодо технократиялык ыкмалардын ашыкча колдонуу тенденциялары бар экенин Эрнест Жанаев белгилейт. Бул процесстерге катышкан серепчи катары Эрнест тенденцияларды жөн гана “галочка” үчүн жасалган иш-аракеттер деп сыпаттаган.[4] 2020-жылдын октябрь айындагы окуялар орун албаган учурда дагы, ушул сыяктуу ачык-айкын обзордун чыгышы күтүлмөк.  Жапаров борбордук мамлекеттин бийлигин бекемдөө жолдорун көздөгөндүктөн, мамлекетти башкаруу системасында чыныгы өзгөрүүлөрдү ишке ашыруу шартында гана эл аралык коомчулук консолидациянын жаңы жолдорун таап чыгууга тийиш. Кыргызстан өкмөтү менен түздөн-түз иштөөдөн сырткары өкмөттүк жана институционалдык донорлор көрсөткөн каржы колдоолорун бюрократиялык механизмдердин англис тилиндеги отчетторун камтыган ири сунуштоолорго бириктирүүдө. Мындай жол жергиликтүү жарандык коомдун (активисттер, уюмдар) потенциалын ар дайым бекемдебейт, жана пайда болуп жаткан маселелерди тез жана жаратмандык менен чечүүгө тоскоолдуктарды туудурат.[5] Натыйжада, контракттарды консультанттар жана бейөкмөт уюмдар сыяктуу ири эл аралык оюнчулар утуп алышына алып келип, жергиликтүү уюмдар кенже өнөктөштөр катары гана пайда көрүү мүмкүнчүлүгүнө ээ болуп калышат. Киришүү бөлүгүндө жана башка эсселерде айтылгандай, Кыргызстандын жарандык коому тууралуу кеп болгондо, жергиликтүү бейөкмөт уюмдар мыйзам-укуктук жана саясий басымдын алдында болгону ачык көрүнө баштаган. Тилекке каршы, коомчулуктун көпчүлүгүнүн көзүнчө аларды коомдон ажыратып бөлүү боюнча кампаниясы ийгиликтүү ишке ашкан. Асель Доолоткелдиева өз эссесин төмөнкү сөздөр менен аяктайт: ‘учурдагы кырдаалда либералдык бейөкмөт уюмдар менен көз карандысыз жалпыга маалымдоо каражаттары коомчулуктун ишениминен чыгып, батышчыл агенттер деген репутацияга кабылышканын түшүнүү керек. Мындай иш-аракеттердин кийинки уланышы либералдык коом болобу, эл аралык коомчулуктун имиджи болобу, эч кимисине пайда алып келбейт. Адам укуктарынын сакталышына (ошондой эле ЛГБТ коомчулугунун укуктарына да) жасалган басым Батыш мамлекеттеринин имиджин бир кыйла начарлатып, батыш идеалдардын жана долбоорлордун жергиликтүү саясатка тийгизген таасири бара бара төмөндөгөн’.  Ошентип, бардык деңгээлде жүргүзүлгөн ишмердүүлүктүн жыйынтыктары жана аткарылышы боюнча негиздүү кооптонууларды эске алганда, өкмөттөр, көп тараптуу мекемелер (өнүктүрүү банктары) жана Кыргызстандагы эл аралык фонддордун короткон бардык донорлук каражаттарын көз карандысыз, ачык жана бирдиктүү карап чыгууга орчундуу себептер бар болуп, фактыларды чогултуунун кеңири процесстери менен негизделүүсү зарыл. Бул процесстерге кеңири коомдун пикирин (коом өз приоритети катары эмнени көргүсү келгенин аныктоого өбөлгө түзүп, мурунку жумшалган аракеттерди эскерүү менен учурдагы кырдаалды канчалык деңгээлде түшүнүп тургандыгын белгилөө) түзүү үчүн көз карандысыз багыттоо группалардын жана коомдук пикирди сурамжылоонун жүргүзүлүшү кирет.[6] Мындай сурамжылоого бир гана донорлордун демилгелерине катышкандар кирбестен, Шаршенова белгилегендей, көз караштары айырмаланган кишилер менен дагы иштешип көрүү керек (демек донорлордун ишин орто деңгээлде жана конструктивдүү сын айткандарды камтып, либералдуу көз караштан алыс болгон эксперттер жана кызыкдар болгон институттар болушу мүмкүн).[7] Кайсыл обзор болбосун, баары жергиликтүү факттарга таянуусу шарт, бирок бул жыйынга кирген эсселердин авторлору өздөрүнүн маанилүү сунуштамаларын бере алышат. Өнүктүрүү жаатында алдыңкы практикага ылайык И. Шаршенова менен А. Доолоткелдиева эл аралык эмес, жергиликтүү деңгээлде  демократиянын жана башкаруунун практикасынын тамырлап кетүүсүнүн жаңы жолдорун табууга чечкиндүү түрдө чакырат.  Шаршенова “демократия мамлекеттин ичинен тузулүп, Европа Биримдиги демократиянын жергиликтүү түшүнүүнүн өзгөчөлүктөрүн жана анын түрлөрүн эске алуусу керек” деп айтса, Доолоткелдиева “Кыргызстанда кенен таралган батышчылдыкка каршы көз карштардын фонунда бейөкмөт уюмдар менен либералдык баалуулуктардын терс образдарын оңго буруу үчүн, батыш өнөктөштөр өздөрү элестеткенинен айырмаланган адам укуктарынын башка образдарын жайылтуунун үстүнөн иштеши керек” деп өз эмгегинде жазган. Бирок, негизги көңүлдү конкреттүү тузүмдөргө эмес, жалпы принциптерге буруу зарыл, анткени батыш институттары менен ишмердүулүгү мисал катары келтирилиши кээде идеяларды чагылдырып, ыкчам түшүнүүсүн камсыздайт. Ал эми Кыргызстанда иштеген система мыйзамдуулукту түзүүдө жергиликтүү баалуулуктарынан, тарыхынан жана башка өнүгүп жаткан өлкөлөрдүн алдыңкы практикаларынан мисалдарды колдонуу мүмкүнчүлүгүнөн пайда көрө алат. Негизги концептуалдык маселелеринин бири болуп эл аралык коомчулуктун приоритеттерин аныктоосу саналууда. Либералдык демилгелерге карата Кыргызстандыктардын көпчүлүгүнө таандык болгон цинизмдин жогорку деңгээлин эске алуу менен, авторлордун кээ бирлери укуктарга эмес, билим берүү менен экономикалык коопсуздук тармактарына артыкчылк берүүнү сунушташкан. Бул маселени бир нече көз караштан баамдоого мүмкүн. Биринчиден, учурда Кыргызстандагы ири донорлук долбоорлордун көбү билим берүүнүн жеткиликтүүлүгүн жакшыртууга жана экономиканын курулушуна багытталып, чектелген аралаш жыйынтыктарына ээ болгон.  Бирок, эгерде жакырчылыкты жоюу жана популисттик нааразычылык менен күрөшүүгө болгон муктаждыкты донорлор стратегиялык приоритет катары кабыл алса, анда  экономикалык теңсиздик маселелерин тикелей чечүүгө көңүлдү буруу мүмкүнчүлүгү пайда болот. Мисалы, жогорку деңгээлдеги бизнес менен ишкерликке басым жасабастан, кирешеси төмөнүрөөк болгон үй-бүлөлөрдүн арасынан муктаждыгы эң чоң болгондорго колдоо көрсөтүү керек. Экинчиден, дүйнө жүзү боюнча  өнүктүрүүгө сарпталган бюджеттерди кыскартуу боюнча глобалдык контекстин баса белгилөө керек. Мисал катары жакырчылыкты жоюу боюнча аракеттер ийгиликтүү аягына чыкты деген билдирүүлөрдүн негизинде жана приоритеттер кайрадын каралып чыкканына байланыштуу Германиянын Кыргызстандагы эки тараптуу донорлуктан чыгып кетиши жана Улуу Британиянын тышкы жардамга бөлүнгөн бюджеттин кескин жана глобалдуу кыскарылышын айтсак болот.[8] Ошондуктан, COVID боюнча колдоо көрсөтүүнүн ыкчам схемалары токтотулгандан кийин, экономиканын инклюзивдүү өсүшүнүн жаңы жана ири долбоордун каржыланышы ресурстарды табуудан кыйналып калышы ыктымал. Үчунчүдөн, жарандык эркиндик менен демократияга глобалдык контекстте басым жасоодон мурда, “Батыш” донорлордун алгач экономикалык өнүктүрүүгө көңүл буруу керектигин баяндаган факттарды изилдеп чыгуусу маанилүү. Мисалы, 1990-жылдардан баштап Уганда жана Руанда сыяктуу өлкөлөргө батыш мамлекеттери өнүктүрүү максатында ири көлөмдө жардамын көрсөтушкөн. Бул өлкөлөрдө билим берүү тармагында жергиликтүү демилгелери ийгиликтүү ишке ашырылып, таза сууга болгон жеткиликтүүлүк камсыздалып, медициналык-санитардык тез жардамдын жакшыртуусу жана микродеңгээлде экономикалык өсүү орун алган. Бирок, бул эки мамлекет (жана башка жардам кабыл алуучу өлкөлөр) азыр деле авторитардык режимде болуп, Уганда жакынкы шайлоолордо репрессияларды башынан кечирип, Transparency International уюмунун коррупция боюнча рейтингде Кыргызстандан да төмөн сапта жайгашып, начар көрсөткүчкө ээ болгон.[9]  Албетте, өнүктүрүү жаатында жогорудагыдай демилгелер адамдардын жашоо шарттарын жакшыртууда чоң мааниге ээ боло албайт, бирок келечекте саясий өнүгүү менен реформалар үчүн плацдармды автоматтуу түрдө камсыздалганы тууралуу чектелген далилдер бар. Ошентип, Кыргызстандын экономикалык өсүшүндө, жакырчылыкты жоюу жана теңдикти камсыздоодо алдыга жылыштын жок болгондугу улутчул жана каршы топторго бейөкмөт уюмдардын каржылануусун текебердик менен салыштырууга мүмкүнчүлүк түзүлгөн. Бирок жакырчылык Кыргызстандын экономикалык өсүшүндө жана теңдикти камсыздоодо алдыга жылыштын жок болгондугун түпкү себеби болгон коррупция менен сарамжалсыз башкаруудан алаксатуу үчүн колдонулуп келет. Автор “өнүктүрүүдө” же жарандык менен саясий укуктардын жаатында ультиматум ыкмасын колдонуудан алыс турууга кеңеш берип кетмекчи. Мындай эскертүүнүн себеби Кыргызстандын көйгөйлөрүнүн түбүндө жаткан отчеттуулук, ачык-айкындык жана башкаруу маселелерин чечүү үчүн эки маанилүү программасынын эффективдүү бириктирилип калышы. Бул кеңеш үмүттү үзүп, эл талыкпай эмгектенген үчүн максаттарынан баш тартып, колун түшүрүп отуруп калуу үчүн берилген жок. Адамдардын жашоосуна оң таасирин тийгизип, өткөн мезгилде орун алган көптөгөн программалар бар, жана өнүктүрүү жаатында белгилүү бир маселелерди чечүүдө жардам кылуу үчүн донорлордун кайсы гана жаңы стратегиясы болбосун, ар бири мамлекет менен иштешүүнүн жолдорун таап кетиши керек; азыр дагы эл аралык тажрыйба менен ири масштабда иш жүргүзүү жөндөмдүүлүгүнө маани берилет; жарандык коомдун түзүлүп калган жана жаңы пайда болуп келе жаткан топтор менен иштешүүгө кырдаалдын кийинки өнүгүүсү үчүн чоң мааниге ээ болот. Көптөгөн басымды башынан кечирген укук коргоочулар менен жарандык коомдун активисттерин өзгөчө баса белгилеп кетүү керек. Алар кыянаттыкты алдын алууга жана өзгөрүүлөргө акырындап мандай тери менен жеткени үчүн көптөгөн жеке азап тартышкан. Узак-мөөнөттүн аралыгында кыжырына тийген таасирдүү күчтөрдөн өздөрүн сактап калуу үчүн жөн гана эркиндик менен камсыз кылуу жетишсиз болот. Бирок, ага карабастан, бул тема тууралуу олуттуу ой-жүгүртүүгө мезгил келди. Бул жыйын бардык суроолорго жоопторду камтыбаса да, кээ бир маселелерге чечүү жолдору боюнча сунуштамаларын берип кетмекчи. Демек, каржылоо приоритеттеринде ар бир орчундуу өзгөрүү жогоруда сунушталган  обзордун жыйынтыктарына негизделип, коомчулуктун ишенимин жогорулатуу максатында жергиликтүү талап менен аныкталышы керек. Ошондуктан, бул жыйын сунуштаган анализдин натыйжасында ортого чыккан бир катар маанилүү темаларын карап чыгуу зарыл. Биринчиден, отчеттуулукка, ачык-айкындыкка жана башкаруу процесстерге басымдын жасалышы бул жыйында белгиленген коррупция, жазасыздык жана жек көрүү (көп учурларда улутчулдук, гомофобия жана аялдарды жек көрүүчүлүккө байланыштуу) сыяктуу системалык көйгөйлөрдү чечүүдө маанилүү рол ойнойт. Экинчиден, бул жыйынга салым кошкон авторлор жана бул изилдөөнүн алкагында жүргүзүлгөн сурамжылоого катышкандардын оюна караганда, алар саясий партиялар менен парламенттин эл аралык кызматташтыгы боюнча мурунку ишин кайрадан ойлонуп чыгууга чакырууда, анткени акыркы окуялар саясий механизмдерде болгон боштукту мурункудан дагы ачык көрсөтүштү. Дипломатиянын бир түрү катары жарандык коом менен биргеликте саясий идеяларды өнүктүрүүгө катышууга тыюу салынышын же өкмөт аралык биргелешкен аракеттердин токтотулушун билдирбейт. Бирок учурдагы саясий система бийликтин чыныгы жайгашкан жерин жана партиялык лоялдуулуктун убактылуу мүнөзүн эске алуу менен, эң аз дегенде кыска мөөнөттүн ичинде потенциалды өстүрүү боюнча аракеттер башка көз караш менен каралып чыгышы керек. Үй-булө зомбулугу менен күрөшүү, аялдардын жана ЛГБТ коомчулугунун укуктарын коргоо боюнча иштери донорлор үчүн эң маанилүү тармак болуп саналууда. Себеби, бул коомчулукту коргоо үчүн бөлүнүүчү ички каражаттардын варианттары аз болуп, алар күнүмдүк жашоодо кабылуучу тобокелдер өсүп жаткандыктан, коркунчтардын үстүнөн мониторинг жүргүзүү жана ыктымалдуу зордук-зомбулукту алдын алуу үчүн аракеттеринин зарылдыгы көрүнүүдө. Бирок, мындай аракеттер толук кандуу саясий “куралга” айланып, көбүнчө либералдык маанайдагы демилеглерге жана жалпысынан “Батышка” каршы багытталганы ачык эле билинди. Бул маселелер боюнча коомдун пикирин өзгөртө ала турган көйгөйдүн жөнөкөй чечүү жолдору жок, бирок донорлор бул маселеге башка көз караш менен мамиле жасай алышат. Мисалы, Кыргызстан калкынын калың катмарлары менен кызыкчылыгы бир болгон тармактарга басым жасаган өздөрүнүн ири катышуусунун тегерегинде баяндамаларын өнүктүрүү жана аны алдыга жылдырууну ойлонуштуруп чыгышы. Жергиликтүү тандоолордун жана либералдык жарандык коомдун (журналисттер, укук коргоочулар, бейөкмөт уюмдардын кызматкерлери жана юристтер) жасаган ишине негизделген позитивдүү, бириктирген жана коомду кызыктырган баяндамалардын жаралышы коомдук пикирин бара бара өзгөрүүсүндө мүмкүн эң эффективдүү ыкмасы болуп калар. Факт-чекинг (факттардын далилденип чыгышы) жана мифтердин жоюлушу саясий элиталарды жарандык коомдун иштери менен тааныштыруу үчүн пайдалуу болушу мүмкүн. Бирок, факт-чекинг менен мифтерди жою туралуу жүргузүлгөн кеңири изилдөөлөр мындай ыкманын скептиктерге карата колдонулушу жетишсиз болуп калышын көрсөткөн. Анда маалыматты жеткирүүчү тарапка эл ишенбей, ал эми туура эмес маалыматты таркаткандар болсо (көбүнчө тааныш адамдар) ишенимдүү маалымат булагы деп эсептелген учурларын өзгөчө белгилей кетүү керек. Демек, Гульзат Байалиева менен Джолдон Кутманалиев билдиргендей, калп маалымат менен күрөшүүдө чабуул жасоо тактикасы элдин каршылыгын басаңдатпастан, тескерисинче кайра күчөтүп, элдин ортосундагы түшүнбөстүк жаракасын тереңдетип, калктын калың катмарына багытталган терс маалыматтар учурлардын көбүндө тез таркалышына алып келүүсү ыктымал. Жаңы талкуулоолордун учурунда ортого чыккан айырмачылыктарга сый мамиле жасоо менен жалпы бир пикирге келүүнүн башка, конфронтациясы жеңилирээк болгон жолдор бар.  Өсүп-өркүндөп жаткан психология боюнча дүйнөлүк адабияттан жана маалымат менен алмашуудан сабак алууга мүмкүнчулүк түзүлүп, бул жаатта алдыңкы практикаларын Кыргызстанда жайылтууга умтулуу керек. Либералдык жарандык коомдун жаңы ыктыярчыларын жана социалдык кыймылдарын колдоодо жогоруда белгиленген жолдор тийгизе турган жана тийгизеер таасирин донорлор карап чыгышат.[10] Доолоткелдиева белгилегендей, өзгөрүүлөрдүн жана бийликтин чыныгы булактары жайгашкан жерин аныктоо максатында жарандык мобилизациянын жандураак формаларынын масштабы менен динамикасын түшүнүү жана чагылдыруу үчүн дагы көп нерселерди жасоого мүмкүн. Бул кыймылдар менен  эл аралык коомчулуктун ортосунда сүйлөшүүлөр активисттердин каалоолорун эске алуу менен жүргүзүлүшү маанилүү. Эл аралык донорлор  менен мамилени тузүүдө (алардын жардамы пайдалуу болгон мезгилде дагы)активисттер кылдаттыкты көрсөтүшү мүмкүн, анткени салттуу көз карашта болгон жарандык коом активисттерди “Батыш” менен болгон байланышы үчүн жетиштүү түрдө каралаган. Донорлордун жарандык коомго багытталган салттуу колдоосу жөнүндө сөз кылганда, жогоруда белгиленгендей реформалардын жасалышы жана башка көз караштан каралып чыгышы керектелет. Бири бирине бираз карама-каршы келсе да, буларды  жүзөгө ашырууда өбөлгө түзүп берүүчү эки сунуштама бар.  Донорлордун өлкөлөрүндө иштелип чыккан стратегияларын колдонгондун ордуна, жергиликтүү керектөөлөрдөн келип чыккан приоритеттерге так багыт алууга жана өзгөрмө жергиликтүү шарттарына көнүп кетүүгө өбөлгө түзгөн донорлордун оперативдүү реакция жасаганынан жана алардын ийкемдүүрөөк мамилесинен жарандык коомдун жергиликтүү топтору пайданы гана көрө алат. Салык төгүүчү-донорлорго отчеттуулукту жана көзөмөлдү орнотуу талабына умтулуусу өсүп жаткан кезде, мындай ийкемдүү ыкма (негизги каржылануу да камтылган) донорлор менен иш мамилелери тузүлгөн жана ыкчам потенциалы шексиз болгон ишенимдүү өнөктөштөрдүн ишине таянат. Бул кеңеш экинчи сунуштама менен толук дал келбей калат, анткени Ширин Айтматованын жана башкалардын “кээ бир донорлордун колдонгон ыкмалары жана өнөктөштүк мамилелери бир нече он жылдыктан мурун эскирип калган” деген сынын эске алуу менен, экинчи сунуштун маңызында жаңы үндөрдү жана ой-жүгүртүүнү колдоо үчүн колдоонун башка түрлөрүн табуу зарылдыгы жатат. Жергиликтүү кыргыз коомчулукта жаратмандыкка, инновацияларга жана тобокелдерди кабыл алууга талабы батыштын салык төгүүчү донорлордун отчет берүү талабы менен дал келбөө ыктымалдуулугу байкалууда.  Ишти “галочка” үчүн жасоону карикатуралык түрдө чагылдыргандын ордуна баа менен сапаттын ара катышын көрсөтүү үчүн маанилүү болгон жыйынтык менен инновациялардын керектигин далилдөө зарыл. Батыштан келген жардам боюнча скептик ойдо болгондор туура сунушталып, жаратман мамилени камтыган демилгелерди кароого макулдугун береер чыгар, анткени алардын көбүнчө негизсиз болгон кооптонуулары жергиликтүүлөрдүн “кадымки шектүүлөр” же “грант жегичтер” деген даттануулары менен окшошуп кетүүсүн өзгөчө эске алуу керек.  Ар бир стратегиялык өзгөрүүлөр боюнча чечимдер чыныгы маалыматтарга негизделип, аягында колдонулуучу ыкма жаңы муундагы уюмдарды тартууну камтып, кээ бир ишенимдүү өнөктөштөрдүн ийкемдүүрөөк болушунун керектигине негизделип калышы мүмкүн. Бирок, эгерде донорлук жардамга болгон күмөндөрдүн жоюулушу керектелсе, колдонулуучу ыкмада “жаңы” бир нерсенин терисин жамынган жөнөкөй иш болбоосу өтө маанилүү. Жогоруда талкуулангандай, ар бир стратегиялык өзгөрүүлөр эл аралык донорлорго кыйын болуп турган учурда орун алууда, анткени COVID пандемиясын кошо эрчип талаптар өсүп, аны менен бирге бюджеттер кыскартылып баштаган. Мындай кырдаалда амалдарды табууга мүмкүнчүлүктөр азайып, чоң мааниге ээ болгон каржылоонун туруктуулугунун жана божомолдоосун камсыздалышы татаалдашууда.  Бирок, эл аралык коомчулукта өзүндө бар болгон таасир этүүчү бир катар куралдар тууралуу бирдиктүү ой-пикири болуусу маанилүү. Европа Биримдиги талкуулоолорду жүргүзүп бүткөнүн, бирок Кыргызстан менен Европа Биримдигинин ортосундагы 2019-жылкы Кыргызстан менен кеңейтилген өнөктөштүк жана кызматташуу боюнча келишимин  эмдигиче ратификациялабаганын, ал эми Улуу Британия болсо өзүнүн жаңы өнөктөштүк макулдашуулар боюнча учурда талкуулоолорду жүргүзүп жатканын эске алуу менен, кээ бир конкреттүү жана өлчөмдүү иш-аракеттердин ордуна  келишимдерди оң жыйынтыктары менен аяктоо мүмкүнчүлүктөрү бар(эгерде Кыргызстан менен Улуу Британиянын ортосунда макулдашуу түзүлсө, анда анын Европа Биримдигинин учурдагы пландарына дал келүүсү). Бул конкреттүү иш-аракеттер өнөктөштөрдү адам укуктары жаатында кийин артка чегинүү болбойт деген ишенимин бекемдөө максатында жасалмакчы. Антикоррупциялык кепилдиктин жана адам укуктарынын жаатында болгон шарттарды эске алуу менен өнөктөштөр соода жана инвестициялык стимулдарын колдонуунун жаңы жолдорун табуу боюнча изилдөө иштерин уланта алмак.  Жогоруда айтылган шарттар өнүктүрүү жаатындагы жыйынтыктарды жакшыртуу жана реформаларды стимулдаштыруу максатында колдонулуп, ыңгайлаштырылмак. Так аныкталган стандарттар менен шартталуусу сөзсүз маанилүү болот, бирок Кыргызстандын стратегиялык приоритеттер жагынан “Батыш” ачык эле Орусия менен Кытайдан артта калган абалда, резонанска күчөтүлгөн стимул менен коштолуусу керектелет.  Мындай күчөтүлгөн стимул катары карыз жүгүн жеңилдетүү жолдорун табылышын кароого мүмкүн (проценттик ченин төмөндөтүү), мисалы Кыргызстандын көп тараптуу банктарга жана башка батыш өнөктөштөргө таандык болгон карыз жүгүн (жалпы тышкы карыздын көлөмүнөн 44% түзүп, 1,7 миллиард АКШ долларга барабар болуп, дүйнөлүк стандарттар боюнча чоң эмес сан катары эсептелүүдө)  кыскартуу жана жеңилдетүү.[11] Ушундай багытта иш-аракеттер кызматтарды каржылоосуна мамлекеттик киреше бюджетинен  акчанын бөлүнүшүнө өбөлгө тузүп, мамлекетке капиталдык салымдардын жаңы долбоорлорун карап чыгуу үчүн саясатта ар кандай амалдарын табууга мүмкүнчүлүктөрдү жаратмак (карыз жүгүн учурдагы жеңилдетүүгө болгон комплекстүү иш-аракеттер Кытай жана башка өнөктөштөр тарабынан берилген жаңы кредиттерге тиешелүү ачык-айкындыктын жана отчеттулугунун жогорулатуу жолдорун табууга байланыштуу болушу мүмкүн). Кыргызстан системасынын ичинде болгон кемчиликтерди жокко чыгарууда өлкөнүн сыртында жайгашкан эл аралык коомчулуктун аткара алчу так аныкталган ролу бар. Бул АКШ, Улуу Британия жана Европа Биримдиги тарабынан жеке санкциялардын киргизилишин билдирет (анын ичинде активдердин жана банк системаларынын тоңдурулушу, визалык тыюулардын киргизилиши), ошондой эле Улуу Британиянын “Келип чыгышы түшүнүксүз болгон байлыктар” аттуу буйрук сыяктуу коррупцияга каршы механизмдери иш жүзөгө ашырылышы мүмкүн.[12] Ал эми АКШ коррупция айыбы боюнча Райымбек Матраимовго карата Магнитский санкцияларын киргизүүгө үлгүргөн.[13] Улуу Британия менен Европа Биримдигинин схемалары мындай санкцияларды киргизүү үчүн коррупция боюнча айыптар негизди тузө албастыгын белгилешүүдө, бирок Кыргызстандагы коррупциялык чатактарда ачыкка чыккан активдерин табууга мүмкүн болгон юрисдикцияларда коррупция менен күрөшүүдө башка куралдары ыңгайлуу болуп чыгаар.[14] Бирок, Азимжан Аскаровдун түрмөгө камалышына жана аны кыйноого тиешеси бар расмий өкүлдөрү бардык үч механизмде катышуу укугуна ээ болуу керектиги менен жазасыздыкка каршы белги жиберилүүдө. Бул механизмдердин алкагында шектелген кылмышкерлерге түздөн-түз тийүүчү таасири болжолдуу төмөнүрөөк болот. Албетте, кыргыз элиталар тарабынан эл аралык кыймылсыз мүлк рыноктордун, компаниялардын түзүлүшү жана башка куралдардын колдонулушу Батыштын коррупцияга каршы багытында ири реформаларга болгон муктаждыгы бар экенин далилдөөдө.  Бул тема тууралуу Foreign Policy Center (Тышкы саясат борборунун) башка басылмаларында жана башка көптөгөн адабияттарда сөз болмокчу.[15] Жергиликтүү аймактарда кырдаалды жөнгө салууда социалдык тармактардын эл аралык компаниялары сөзсүз өз ролун ойноп коюшу мүмкүн. Алар жек көрүүнү чагылдырган онлайн пикир билдирүүлөр менен күрөшүү максатында кыргыз тилин колдоонун жана модерация жеткиликтүүлүгүн кеңейтүү жолдорун карап чыга алышат. Мисалы, шайлоо, конституциялык референдум сыяктуу саясий чыңалуусу туу чокуда болуп турган маалына же аялдардын Эл аралык күнү сыяктуу чуулуу темаларына өзгөчө басым жасай кетүү зарыл.  ARTICLE 19 уюму жана Бегаим Усенова билдиргендей, социалдык тармактардын келтирилген зыянды калыбына келтирүүнүн ички механизмдери кийинки жакшыртылышына муктаж болуп, гендердик зомбулук менен күрөшүүгө өзгөчө басым жасоо менен кол коюу петициялардын эффективдүүрөөк жайгаштырылышынын керектигин айтышат. Учурдагы ээ боло алган жетишкендиктерди эске алуу менен, зордукка бир нече ирээт кабылгандар үчүн обзор механизмдерин тездетүү боюнча кийинки кадамдары жасалышы керек. Краудфандингден, жарнамадан түшкөн кирешенин жаңы ыкмаларын жана монетизациянын башка ыкмаларын  иштеп чыггууда журналисттер менен активисттерге жардам көрсөтүү максатында социалдык тармактардын компаниялары жана донорлор кызматташуунун жолдорун таба алаары шексиз. Интернетте маалымат таркатуучу каналдарын жана социалдык тармактарды колдонуунун эң мыкты жолдорун дагы камтып, кыргыз тилдуу жана жергиликтүү журналисттерди колдоодо жана иликтөө репортаждарды дайындоо боюнча окутуу процесстерге салттуу донорлук каржылоо жардамды көрсөтө алат жана көрсөтүшү керек. Интернетте катаал мамиленин (жеке коркутуп-үркүтүүгө кошумча алардын күчөшү) өсүп жаткан санын эске алуу менен социалдык тармактардын компаниялары жана донорлор (социалдык компаниялар менен байланышы бар донорлор дагы) ырайымсыздыкка кабылгандарга карата психосоциалдык колдоо көрсөтүү жаатында көбүрөөк иштерди жасоо керек. Аны менен бирге айыл жерлерде колдоосуз калгандарга өзгөчө көңүл буруу менен адвокаттар, бейөкмөт уюмдардын кызматкерлери, укук коргоочулар жана журналисттерге карата катаал мамилелерди бирдиктүү документтештирүүдө көмөкчү болуп берүүлөрү керектелет. Батыш өнөктөштөр бул кырдаалды жөнгө салууда жасай алчу иш-аракеттери боюнча абдан көп маалымат бар, жада калса жогоруда айтылган же жалпысынан бул жыйынга кирген маалыматтан да ашат. Бирок, Кыргызстандын жаңы өкмөттүн саясий курамы көз жаздымда калып кетпөөсү маанилүү. Президент Жапаровдун мурунку өмүр баяны жана анын бийликке келиши келечекте дагы кандай нерселер болуп кетиши мүмкүн деген ой боюнча негиздүү кооптонууларды туудурду. Ошондуктан, мурунку кесиптештеринин бийликке келгенден кийин уланткан жолун унутпастан, келечектеги перспективалар боюнча толук түшүнүктүү скептицизм пайда болгон. Берген убадаларын жүзөгө ашыруу үчүн шыктандыруу менен басымдын туура айкалышын таап, Жапаров алдына койгон максаттарына жараша конструктивдүү кызматташтыктын ылайыктуу ыкмаларын табуу чоң мааниге ээ. Эл аралык өнөктөштөр ансыз деле кыскартылган жарандык коомду кыскартуу боюнча кийинки аракети же анын кыжырын келтирген аярлуу топтор менен журналисттерге багыт алуусу ири масштабдагы макулдашылган жооп соккусуна алып келээрин так аныктап, түшүнүүгө тийиш. Жапаровдун коррупция маселесине көрсөткөн мамилеси тууралуу бул жыйында берилген көптөгөн эскерүүлөргө карабастан, өзүн колдоочуларына  иштеп жаткансыгандай көрсөтүү каалоосу айдан ачык байкалып турат. Мансапкорлорду “кустуруу” боюнча аракеттер Жапаровдун саясий оппоненттерине багытталбайт деген шарт менен гана мындай кубулуш саясий аренадагы күчтөрдүн дүйнөнүн ар кайсы өлкөлөрдө катылган мыйзамсыз табылган байлыктарын эки тараптуу аныктап чыгууга өбөлгө түзүп берет. Мурунку жылдарда орун алган саясий башаламандыкты жөнгө салуу үчүн президент Жапаровдун бийликти борборлоштуруунун жана мамлекетти консолидациялануунун маанилүүлүгүнө болгон ишеними көп убакыттан бери туруктуу. Саясий өнүгүүнүн мындай жолу коом үчүн кандайдыр деңгээлде кызыкчылыкты жаратышы мүмкүн, бирок “президент катары күчтүү адамдын” бийликти башкаруусуна (2005 жана 2010-жылкы төңкөрүштөрдүн негизги фактору) донорлор менен жергиликтүү жарандык коомдун каалабаганына карама каршы келип, алар бийликти Жогорку Кеңеш менен жергиликтүү коомчулуктардын колуна берүү менен ири плюрализмди куруу ниетин көздөгөн. Мактарлык ниетин көздөө менен акыркы он жылдын ичинде жасалган мамиле бийликти кандайдыр бир деңгээлде кайрадан башкача  бөлүштүрүп, бул бөлүштүрүү жашыруун жана түшүнүксүз жолдор аркылуу жасалып, чечимдердин кабыл алынуусуна таасир эткен сырткы оюнчулар жана коррупцияланган парламент менен коштолгон (2020-жылкы октябрь окуяларынын негизги фактору болгон). Жыйындын автору аркасынан түшө түрган, баардыгына туура келген бир да эл аралык модели жок болгондугун таалкуулап, форма менен өкмөттүн функцияларынын, түзүмдөр менен отчеттуулуктун ортосунда так белгиленген байланыш ар дайым боло бербестигин билдирет. Бул кырдаалды идеалдуу болбосо да, бирок кеңири таанылган демократиянын эки моделдердин мисалында чагылдырууга болот. Учурда деле АКШнын Президенти дүйнөдөгү эң таасирдүү киши катары аталганы менен, өлкөнүн президенттик системасы орчундуу “кармоо жана карама каршы механизмдердин” ролун ойногон Конгресс менен соттук системасын эске алуу менен курулуп, иш жузүндө Президент өзүнүн күн тартибинин ири бөлүгүн алдыга чыгарууда чыныгы маселелерге дуушар болот.  Анын үстүнө, штаттардын  деңгээлиндеги олуттуу бийликти эске алуу менен  федералдык өкмөт үстүртөн гана катышкан саясат менен практиканын кеңири тармактары бар. “Парламенттердин энеси” болуп саналган Улуу Британиянын Вестминистер парламенти демократиялык дүйнөдө чындыгында бийликтин орчундуу бөлүгүн борбордук жана аткаруу бийликте консолидациялаган жалгыз мамлекет болуп турат.[16] Шайлоого келип, добуш бергендердин саны төмөн болгонуна карабастан, Жапаровдун президенттик шайлоодо жеңиши жана парламенттик системасынан башкаруунун президенттик формасына өтүүсү анын мамлекетти консолидациялоо жана бийликти борболоштуруу боюнча долбоорун алдыга сүйрөп чыгарууга өбөлгө түзүп берет. Жапаровдун ою боюнча бул кадамы Кыргызстан өкмөтүнүн ишбилгилигин жогорулатууга жана коомчулугу үчүн мыкты жыйынтыктарга жетүүгө шарт түзүп берет. Консолидация процесси өлкөнү толук авторитардык режимине алып келүү тобокелдерин катмыгандыгы анык. Бирок, бийликтин ыйгарым укуктары парламенттен президентке өткөрүп берүү боюнча референдумдун чечими кабыл алынгандан кийин түзүлгөн кырдаалга көз салуу менен чыныгы ачык-айкындыкты жана отчеттуулукту орнотуунун жаңы жол-амалдарын табууга далалат жасоо керек. Референдумдун жыйынтыктарын жана Жапаровдун так аныкталган максаттарын эске алганда, таасири чоң көзүрлөр менен байланышкан же байланышып калышы мүмкүн деп шектелген саясатчыларга бийликти (ошондой эле коррупция менен саясий соодага мүмкүнчүлүк) берген “тең салмактуулукту” сактоо талабына караганда, коомчулук менен кеңешүү (Жапаров сыяктуу популистке реалдуу убактын режиминде элдин чыныгы оюн билүү, аны менен катар Жапаровго көйгөйлөрдү жарата ала турган суроолордон качуу  мүмкүнчүлүгү берилүүдө) жана киргизилип турган өзгөрүүлөрдүн баш айланган ылдамдыгын мезгил мезгил менен токтотуу талаптарын чагылдырган “текшерүүлөрдү” ордунда калтыруу боюнча аргументтер эл арасында колдоо табуу ыктымалдыгы жогорураак.[17] Ортого чыккан маселелердин бири бул “Курултай” маселеси болууда. Бул сунуштун колдоочуларын, анын түзүлүү таржымалын жана  бул мекеменин Борбордук Азияда парламенттик көзөмөлүн начарлантуу же андан айланма жолунун президенттик бийликтин аспабы катары пайдаланган схемалардан кыянаттык менен колдонулганын  эске алуу менен эмне үчүн көптөгөн актвисттер Курултай мекеменин Баш мыйзам долбооруна киригизилүүсүн токтотуу боюнча аракеттерди жасагандыгы түшүнктүү болууда. Бул сунуштама кыскартылган вариантында болсо да, Конституциянын 2021-жылдын февраль айынан каралып чыккан мыйзам долбооруна кирип калган. Ал эми Жапаров президентинин кээ бир тарапташтардын шайлоо коалициясы үчүн маанилүүлүгүн эске алганда, аягында жаңы Конституция шайланып, толук ыктымалдуулук менен кабыл алынгандан кийин, “Курултай” аттуу  мекемеси түзүлчүдөй болуп сезилүүдө. (Бул басылма жарыялангандан кийин, 2021-жылдын 11-апрель күнү “Элдик курултай” түзүү талабын камтыган Баш мыйзам долбоору кабыл алынган) Ошондуктан, Баш мыйзамдын долбооруна кирген “Курултай” боюнча жобосун жокко чыгарууну көздөгөн аракеттер уланышы мүмкүн, бирок жарандык жана эл аралык коомчулугунун Кырыгызстандагы жергиликтүү жамааттардын практикасынан жана дүйнө жүзү боюнча өнүгүп келе жаткан өлкөлөрдөгү консультативдик органдардын модельдеринен өздөштүрүүчү сабактарын карап чыгуусу маанилүү, анткени ал жактагы идеялар учурда кыргыз коомунда таралып жаткан ойлорго караганда алда канча пайдалуураак болушу мүмкүн. Эгерде батыш моделдери талкуулоодо пайдасын тийгизе алса, анды мисал катары Европа экономикалык жана социалдык комитетин алып карасак болот. Бул мекеме Европа Биримдигинин “социалдык өнөктөштөр” боюнча жай иштеген жана бюрократиялык кеңешме (консультативдик) органдын ролун ойнойт. Негизинен, Европа Биримдигин демократиялык түзүмдөрүнө кээ бир учурларда пайдалуу жана залалы тийбеген толуктоо болуп берет, жада калса “Жарандык ассамблеясынын” модельдерин дагы толуктап, булар Ирландия мамлекетинде көп колдонулуп, Канада жана Дания сыяктуу өлкөлөрүндө да өмүр сүрөт.[18]  Сөз жок, инклюзивдүү жамааттык талкулоо жана чечимдерди кабыл алуу үчүн бир катар ар түрдүү ойлор бар, бирок эгерде мыкты идеялардын ээлери бул кеңешменин ишмердүүлүгүнө катышпай калса, анда ал өзүн өзү жарыялаган, сүйлөй алган дүкөндүн ролун ойногон мекеме уулгайган чалдар жана бийликти кармап тургандардын каалоолорунун чексиз мөөрү катары колдонулуп калаары толук ыктымал. “Курултайдын” тегерегинде болгон талаш-тартышуулардан сырткары Баш мыйзамдын февраль айында жайрыяланган долбооруна кирген башка талаш маселелерге аракеттерди жумшоо керек. Автор 4 өзгөчө маселелерди белгилөөдө. Учурдагы Баш мыйзамдын 8.4 беренеси “саясий партиялар, профсоюздар жана башка коомдук бирикмелер өздөрүнүн каржы-экономикалык ишмердүүлүктөрүнүн ачык-айкындыгын камсыздоого тийиш” деген талабын камтып, бейөкмөт уюмдарын жөнгө салуу боюнча аракеттери конституция менен күчтөлүп, бюрократиялык басымды камсыздоодо. Бул басым “Өсүп келе жаткан муунду коргоо максатында Кыргыз Республикасынын элинин коомдук аң-сезими менен моралдык жана этикалык  баалуулуктарга карама-каршы келген иш-чараларга мыйзам боюнча чектөө киргизилиши мүмкүн” деген 10.4 беренесинде бираз жумшартылса да, сакталып калган “моралдык баалуулууктардын” критерийи туруктуу тынчсызданууну жаратууда.  Бул критерийлер “салттуу” сезимдерди кемсинткен ЛГБТ жана аялдардын укуктары боюнча маселелерин талкуулоосун басаңдатууга жол ачкандан көрө, порнография сыяктуу жаш курак боюнча туура келбеген нерселерден жаш муунду коргоодо гана колдонулаарын камсыздалуусуна бардык аракеттерди жумшоо керек. Бул жаатта коркунучтуу прецедент катары “жаш балдарды үй-бүлөлүк салттуу баалуулуктарын четке каккан маалыматтан сактоо жөнүндө” Орусиянын федералдык мыйзамдын колдонуу тажрыйбасын айтсак болот, анткени бул мыйзам ЛГБТ коомчулукту басмырлоодо колдонулган.[19] Сардорбек Абдухалилов сунушталып жаткан Баш мыйзамдын жаңы долбоорунда учурдагы Конституциянын  38-беренесинде берилген “ар бир жаран өзүнүн этникалык таандыгын өзү эркин аынктоого укугу бар. Өзүнүн этникалык таандыгын белгилеп жана көрсөтүүгө эч ким мажбурлай албайт” деген талабы жок экенин белгилеп кеткен. Акыркы убакта паспорттордо жана башка өздүк документтердин түрлөрүндө жарандын каалоосу боюнча этникалык таандыгын белгилөө тилкенин мамлекет тарабынан киргизилүүсү үчүн бул талап жумшарганына карабастан, ар кандай кооптонуулар бар.[20] Мисалы, бул маселе Конституцияда каралбай калган болсо, жакын арада эле сунушталган 1.5  беренесинде “Кыргызстандын эли Кыргыз Республикасынын бардык этникалык топтордун жарандары болушат” деп айтылганына да карабастан өздүк документтерде этникалык таандыгын көрсөтүүгө милдеттүү болуп калышы ыктымал.[21] Ошондой эле, Абдухалилов шайлоо тизмелериндеги азчылык топтору үчүн бар болгон квоталарын сактап калуусунун маанилүүлүгүнө өзгөчө басым жасап, мамлекеттик кызматтарда жана органдарда көп түрдүүлүктү жакшыртуу боюнча жогорудагы сунуштамага окшош чаралардын көрүлүшү керектигин билдирүүдө. Баш мыйзамдын жаңы долбоорундагы 105-берене Башкы прокуратуранын ыйгарым укуктарын мындан да кеңейтүүгө багытталгандай көрүнөт. Бул беренеде “мыйзамдардын жана башка укук-ченемдик актылардын так жана бир түрдүү аткарылышынын үстүндөгү көзөмөл Кыргыз Республикасынын Башкы Прокуратура тарабынан жүргүзүлөт” деп айтылууда.[22]  “Адилет” юридикалык клиникасынын айтымында, бул берене “прокурорлорго жарандарды, коммерциялык уюмдарды, бейөкмөт менен коммерциялык эмес уюмдарды, мекемелерди, өндүрүштөрдү ж.б.у.с. текшерүүгө укук берет” деп чечмеленип, дагы башка көзөмөл механизмдердин ишин жүргүзүүгө же аларды көзөмөлгө алууга шарт түзүп берет.[23] Эгерде алдын алуунун эффективдүү чаралары көрүлбөсө, бийликтин мындай консолидациясы өкмөттү сындагандарга карата басым жасоо куралына айланып калышы мүмкүн. Жасмин Кэмерон Кыргызстандын жаңы куралган өкмөтүнө “аярлуу жана маргиналдашып калгандардын укуктарын коргоо сапатын жогорулатуу максатында жаңы багыт картасын” иштеп чыгуусун сунуштоодо. Мындай “багыт карта” катары “Журналисттердин коопсуздугун камсыздоо боюнча иш-аракеттердин Улуттук Планын” кароого болот. Бул План Бегаим Усенова жана  ARTICLE 19 уюму сунуштаган так аныкталган процедураларды жана укуктук потенциалын камтыйт. Жээнбековдун маалына таандык болгон 2019-2021 жылдардагы Адам укуктары боюнча иш-аракеттердин Улуттук Планынын ордуна келген мындай жаңы План Жапаровдун ушул сыяктуу күн тартибин орнотуу жоопкерчилигин өз мойнуна алуусуна өбөлгө түзүп бере алмак. Ошондой эле, бул Планды учурдагы президент өзүнүн сынчыларын жана аны менен макул болбогондорду өзү же өзүнүн тарапташтары аларга басым жасоо максатында президенттик “бейбаштардын кафедрасын” (Президенттин Администрациясы) кыянаттык менен колдонбооруна ынандыруу аракеттерине негиз катары колдонууга мүмкүн болмок. Адам укуктары жаатында кайсыл гана “жол көрсөтүүчү карта” же иш-аракеттердин планы болбосун, ар бириси эл аралык коомчулуктун көңүлүн алаксыткан, дагы бир маанисиз кагаз барагы болбоого тийиш. Мындай документ өкмөт тарабынан жазылып, ага таандык болуусу керек. Ал документ адам укуктарынын, өнөктөштүк тууралуу жаңы макулдашууларына кол коюлушу, карыз жүгүн жеңилдетүү, өкмөткө көрсөтүлүүчү жаңы жардам, экономикалык өнүгүүгө жана инфратүзүмдөргө келечекте тартылчу инвестициялардын шарттары менен негизделүүсү абзел. Жыйынга салым кошкон бир нече авторлор президент Жапаров ким экенин жана бийликке кандайча келип калганынан түшүнүүгө бираз жол ачканы аракет жасашууда. Жапаров коомчулуктун орчундуу бөлүгүндө колдоо таба алган жеке окуяга ээ болгон, же жок эле дегенде  мындай окуяны жаратууга жөндөмдүү болуп чыккан. Аксана Исмаилбекова “Жапаров мыйзам үстөмдүгүн бузганына карабастан аны эл эмне үчун колдогонун түшүнүү үчүн, өзбек ишкерлердин коопсуздук стратегияларына көңүл буруу маанилүү. Алар “карама-каршы” инсан болгон, бирок ошол эл убакта мыйзамдын адилетсиздигин жөн териси менен сезген жана башка күчтүү “мафияларга” туруштук көрсөтө билген бирөөгө ишенишет. Кыргызстандын мисалында мамлекеттин, бизнестин жана кылмыштуулуктун ортосунда болгон чектер билинбей калган” деп жазган. Демек, Кыргызстандагы саясатчылардын көпчүлүгү уурулар деген популярдуу ой чындыкка жатса (же жок деген жарымы туура келсе), анда эл карама-каршы далилдер бар болгонуна карабастан өздөрүн кынтыксыз таза кишилер катары көрсөткүсү келгендердин ордуна  өзүн “Робин Гуд” катары көрсөткөдөрдү колдоого жакын болгону түшүнүктүү болууда.   Дүйнө жүзү боюнча популисттер колдонгон туруксуздук боюнча коомдук тынчсыздануунун булагын жана күчкө же эрдикке болгон умтулууну Жапаров дагы өз саясий жолунда пайдаланды.  Мындай динамика кыргыз мамлекетинде потенциалдын жок болгондугунун, коррупциянын жана жакын арада орун алган баш аламандыктын контекстинде өзгөчө актуалдуу болуп турат. Ошентип, Кыргызстандын ичинде жана анын сыртында жайгашкан байкоочулардын тынчсыздануусу толугу менен түшүнүктүү. Бирок, эркиндикке тиешелүү болгон укуктар таптакыр жоюлуп кете электе (же өлкөдө болгон байкоочулар үчүн жаңы альтернативалар пайда болуп баштамайынча) тынчсызданууну козгогон көйгөйлөрдү чечүү үчүн чогула калуу жана уюштуруу аткарылып жаткан маалда Жапаровдун күн тартибинде бир нече маселелерди бириктире алган тармактарды табууга аракет жасоо керек, мисалы  Жапаровдун коррупция менен күрөшүү боюнча маңызсыз кептерден.[24] 2020-жылдын октябрь айына караганда саясий кырдаал кыйла эле өзгөргөндөй көрүнүп турганына карабастан, башка маанилүү тармактарда  абал ошол бойдон калганы жана бул кырдаалды түзүүдө мурункудай эле ошол эле кубулуштар менен күчтөр орун алып жатканы  бул жыйында көрсөтүлүүдө. Келечек күңүрт болуп сезилиши мүмкүн, бирок кара булуттар Кыргызстандын саясий системасын көп убакыт бою каптап келе жаткан. Кыргызстандын эли туруктуу, бирок эркиндик укуктары аярлуу, ошондуктан өлкөдөгү адам укуктарынын алсыроосун алдын алуу үчүн тиешелүү чараларды көрүү зарыл.  Жапаровдун президенттиги коррупция, жазасыздык жана жек көрүүчүлүк менен күрөшүүнү көздөгөн эл аралык коомчулуктун Кыргызстан менен болгон өз ара аракеттешүүсүн жандандырууга, башка көз караштан карап  жана текшерип чыгууга түрткү берүүчү фактордун ролун ойношу керек. Ошентип, бул жыйын Кыргызстандын өкмөтүнө жана эл-аралык институттарга төмөнкүдөй бир нече потенциалдуу сунуштамаларды бермекчи. Кыргызстандын өкмөтүнө, эл-аралык институттарга жана батыш донорлорго берилүүчү сунуштамалар:
  • Жазасыздык, жек көрүү жана коррупция маселелерине олуттуу көңүл буруу;
  • Кыргызстанда эл-аралык донорлордун тарабынан каржыланып жаткан долбоорлор системалык түрдө текшерилип турушу керек. Мындай долбоорлорго бюджеттик колдоо, консультация кызматтарын колдонуу жана бейөкмөт уюмдар менен иш алпаруулар кирет. Алардын текшерилиши фактылар менен ар тараптуу катышуунун негизинде жүргүзүлүп, долбоорлордун максаттарына жана алардын ишке ашырылгандыгына көңүл бурулуусу зарыл.
  • Өнөктөштөрдү жергиликтүү баалуулуктар менен тааныштырып, аларга көнүп кетүү үчүн мейкиндик жана керектүү каражаттары менен камсыздап, жаңычыл ой жүгүртүүгө жана жаңы добуштарга болгон мүмкүнчүлүктөрүнүн кеңейтүү жолдорун табуу;
  • Жапаровдун өкмөтүнө Адам Укуктар боюнча жаңы Улуттук Иштер Планын иштеп чыгууга талап коюу;
  • Европа биримдиги менен Улуу Британиянын ортосундагы туюкка кептелип калган өнөктөштүк макулдаштыктарды жөнгө салуу максатында башкаруу жана адам укуктары жаатындагы шарттарды жогорулатуу; карыз жүгүн жеңилдетүү; мамлекеттик жардамды жакшыртуу менен жаңы инвестицияларды тартып келүү;
  • Кыргызстанда Магнитский санкцияларын жана башка коррупцияга каршы механизмдерин кененирээк колдонуу;
  • Социалдык тармактарда кыргыз тилин жайылтуу жана чыгымдарды төлөө механизмдерин бекемдөө;
  • Жаңы Конституциянын мыйзам долбооруна бейөкмөт уюмдарды, профсоюздарды, сөз эркиндигин жана азчылыктардын укуктарын коргоого багытталган өзгөртүүлөрдүн киргизилишине басым жасоо; Башкы прокурордун ыйгарым укуктарын кеңейтилишинен баш тартуу;
  • Жарандык консультациялар үчүн жаңы механизмдерди изилдеп чыгуу, Кыргызстандагы жергиликтүү практикалардан жана башка өнүгүп жаткан өлкөлөрдөгү консультативдик мекемелеринен үйрөнүү, жана жарандык чогулуштарды колдонуу.
 Сүрөт by Dan Lundberg under (CC). [1] Кытай Коммунистик партиясына шилтеме жасабастан,  доктор Мартин Лютер Кинг-кичүүсүнүн рухуна көңүл буруу.[2] Ана-Мариа Ангелеску, Европанын Кыргызстан боюнча сарсанаа болуусу керекпи?, The Diplomat, январь 2021, https://thediplomat.com/2021/01/should-europe-worry-about-kyrgyzstan/; Европа Тышкы иштер Кызматы(EEAS), Кыргыз Республикасы жана Европа Биримдиги, октябрь 2020, https://eeas.europa.eu/delegations/kyrgyz-republic/1397/kyrgyz-republic-and-eu_en; Европа Коммиссиясы, Кыргызстан,  https://ec.europa.eu/international-partnerships/where-we-work/kyrgyzstan_en#:~:text=EU%20bilateral%20development%20cooperation%20with,education%2C%20rural%20development%20and%20investments[3] Донорлор колдогон мыйзам үстөмдүгүн камсыздаган программалардын алкагында алдыга жылыш жок болгонун баса белгилөө максатында Eurasianet Аскаровдун ишин колдонууда: Eurasianet, Кыргызстан: Аскаровдун өлүмү боюнча элдин жини ошол бойдон маанисиз болуп калабы?,июль 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-will-fury-around-askarov-death-end-up-signifying-nothing[4] Автор менен болгон маегинен.[5] Бул эссе отчеттордун англис тилинде жазылуусунун маанилүүлүгүн белгилөөдө: Ана-Мариа Ангелеску, Европанын Кыргызстан боюнча сарсанаа болуусу керекпи?, The Diplomat, январь 2021, https://thediplomat.com/2021/01/should-europe-worry-about-kyrgyzstan/; Киришүү бөлүгүндө айтылып кеткендей, ЮСАИД (USAID) уюмунун каржылоо өнөктөштөрү катары өнүктүрүү боюнча АКШнын консультациялоо кызматтары, ири бейөкмөт уюмдар же башка АКШ агенттиктери болгон: ЮСАИД (USAID), Америка Кошмо Штаттарын өлкөлөргө тышкы жардамы: Кыргызстан, 2018, https://explorer.usaid.gov/cd/KGZ?fiscal_year=2018&measure=Obligations[6] Дүйнө жүзү боюнча ушундай тажрыйбаны эске алуу менен, үйрөнө алчу нерселеринин көпчүлүгү донорлордун мурунку жана учурдагы ишмердүүулүгү тууралуу маалыматтын деталдары боюнча ойлор канчалык деңгээлде тамырлап кеткенин (кээ бирлери абдан тереңдеп кеткен) көрсөтөт.[7]Донорлор каржылаган кызматтарын мурунку жана азыркы колдонуучулар менен бирге аракеттешүүсү менен катарда айыл жергелерине басым жасап, кеңири коомчулук менен маалыматтык-пропагандалоо иштерди жүргүзүү керек.[8] Татьяна Кудрявцева,  Германия Кыргызстан менен болгон кызматташтыгын кыскартканы тууралуу билдирүү жасады, 24.kg, май 2020, https://24.kg/english/152054_Germany_announces_reduction_in_cooperation_with_Kyrgyzstan/[9] Трэнспэренси Интернешинал (Transparency International), Transparency International Уганда, https://www.transparency.org/en/countries/uganda[10]  COVID пандемиясынын ыктымалдуу баш аламандыктан ишкерликти (бизнести) сактап калган элдик кошуундарга, акыркы айларда Баш мыйзамдын жаңы долбоорунда сунушталган кээ бир бөлүктөрүнө каршы жаратман кампанияларын уюштурган “Баштан Башта” аттуу протесттик кыймылына, ыктыярдуу кыймылдарга катышкан жаштарга, диний кайрымдуулук ишмердүүлүгүнө, тилектештиктин кыз-келиндердин топторуна, бизнес-түзүмдөргө жана мигранттарды коргоо системаларына тийгизген таасири.[11] Дирк ван дер Клей, COVID жана Кыргызстан менен Таджикистандын карыздарынын жаңы динамикасы, Eurasianet, октябрь 2020, https://eurasianet.org/covid-and-the-new-debt-dynamics-of-kyrgyzstan-and-tajikistan[12] Орусия, Казакстан жана Азербайджан өлкөлөрүндөй Кыргызстан олигархиянын чет жакка карай экспансиясын камсыдай турган ири көлөмдөгү байлыктарга ээ болбосо да, уюшкан кылмыштуулук менен болгон байланыштарды эске алганда, кээ бир байлыктын булактарына ээ болуп турат. Басымдын мындай потенциалдуу точкалары эл аралык коомчулуктун байкоосунда болуп туруусу зарыл[13]  АКШнын Казына департаменти, Глобалдык Магнитский санкциялары, сентябрь 2020, https://home.treasury.gov/policy-issues/financial-sanctions/recent-actions/20201209[14] Улуу Британиянын Тышкы иштер, англис калктардын шериктештиги жана эл аралык өнүктүрүү боюнча офиси, Колдонмо: Адам укуктары жаатындагы глобалдык санкциялар: бейөкмөт уюмдар менен жарандык коом үчүн маалымат, Government.uk, июль 2020, https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/global-human-rights-sanctions-information-note-for-non-government-organisations-and-others-interested-in-human-rights/global-human-rights-sanctions-information-note-for-ngos-and-civil-society; Улуу Британиянын Тышкы иштер, англис калктардын шериктештиги жана эл аралык өнүктүрүү боюнча офиси, Саясий документ: Адам укуктары жаатындагы глобалдык санкциялар: cанкциянын тизмесине кирүүчү адамдарды карап чыгуу, Government.uk, июль 2020, https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/global-human-rights-sanctions-factors-in-designating-people-involved-in-human-rights-violations/global-human-rights-sanctions-consideration-of-targets;Европа Биримдигинин Кеңеши, Европа Биримдиги адам укуктары жаатында санкциялардын глобалдык режимин кабыл алды, декабрь 2020, https://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/press/press-releases/2020/12/07/eu-adopts-a-global-human-rights-sanctions-regime/[15] Мисалы: FPC, Өзгөрмө дүйнөдө Британиянын ролун аныктоо: Чет өлкөлөрдөгү Биргелишкен Королдуктун баалуулуктарынын долбоору, декабрь 2020, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/projecting-the-uks-values-abroad/; Сьюзен Катри,  Кылдат изилдөө үчүн кооптуу: дүйнө жүзү боюнча коррупция менен каржы кылмыштардын жүзүн ачкан журналисттердин дуушар болгон басымды изилдөө, FPC, ноябрь 2020, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/unsafe-for-scrutiny/; FPC, Кылдат изилдөө үчүн кооптуу: Коррупцияны колдоо максатында Улуу Британиядагы каржы жана укуктук системаларынан кыянаттык менен колдонулуштун дүйнө боюнча иликтөө-журналисттердин эркиндигине жана коопсуздугуна тийгизген терс таасири, декабрь 2020, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/unsafe-for-scrutiny-12-2020-publication/[16]Парламенттик добуштардын көпчүлүгүнө жетүү кепилдигинин шарты менен дээрлик бүткүл демократиялык мезгилдин ичинде шайлоодон биринчи жолу өткөн Улуу Британиянын шайлоо системасы көпчүлүктүн өкмөттөрдүн түзүлүшүнө алып келди. Акыркы убакта мындай кубулуш орун албаганда да, мисалы 2010-15 жылдардын консервативдик-либералдуу демократтардын коалициясында жана 2017-19 жылдардын Парламентинде да, премьер-минист менен министрлердин кабинети парламентке шилтеме бербестен, өздөрү туура көргөндөй ыкчам негизде мамлекетти башкаруу үчүн учурда деле эбегейсиз бийликке ээ болуп турат.[17] Бул терминдин түп-тамыры жайгашкан АКШ системасында текшерүүлөр тең салмактуулукту камсыздаган институттар тарабынан жүргүзүлөт.[18] Жарандык Ассамблея (The Citizen’s Assembly), https://www.citizensassembly.ie/en/[19] Human Rights Watch,  Колдоолонбойт: “Гей пропаганда жөнүндө” орусиялык мыйзамы ЛГБТ жаштарды коркутуу-үркүтүүгө тушуктурууда, декабрь 2018, https://www.hrw.org/report/2018/12/11/no-support/russias-gay-propaganda-law-imperils-lgbt-youth[20] Конституция, Кыргызстандын 2010-жылкы Консституциясы,  constituteproject.org, https://www.constituteproject.org/constitution/Kyrgyz_Republic_2010.pdf[21] Кыргыз Республикасынын Жогорку Кеңеши, Кыргыз Республикасынын Конституциясы жөнүндө"Кыргыз Республикасынын мыйзам долбоору боюнча референдумду (бүткүл элдик добуш берүүнү) дайындоо тууралуу”  Кыргыз Республикасынын мыйзам долбоору 2020-жылдын 17-ноябрынан тарта коомдук талкууга коюлат, ноябрь 2020, http://www.kenesh.kg/ru/article/show/7324/na-obshtestvennoe-obsuzhdenie-s-17-noyabrya-2020-goda-vinositsya-proekt-zakona-kirgizskoy-respubliki-o-naznachenii-referenduma-vsenarodnogo-golosovaniya-po-proektu-zakona-kirgizskoy-respubliki-o-konstitutsii-kirgizskoy-respubliki (2021-жылдын февраль айында чыккан варианты 2021)[22] Ошол эле жерде (Ibid.)[23] Юридикалык клиника “Адилет”, Кыргыз Республикасынын Конституциянын жаңы мыйзам долбоорун талдоо, февраль 2021, https://adilet.kg/tpost/2i09a01nu1-analiz-proekta-konstitutsii-kirgizskoi-r[24]  Күн тартибин мурун орун алган тандалма куугунтуктоо менен жашыруун сөз байлашуулар үчүн колдонулгандын ордуна. [post_title] => Корутунду жана сунуштамалар: Абалды турукташтыруу [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => %d0%ba%d0%be%d1%80%d1%83%d1%82%d1%83%d0%bd%d0%b4%d1%83-%d0%b6%d0%b0%d0%bd%d0%b0-%d1%81%d1%83%d0%bd%d1%83%d1%88%d1%82%d0%b0%d0%bc%d0%b0%d0%bb%d0%b0%d1%80-%d0%b0%d0%b1%d0%b0%d0%bb%d0%b4%d1%8b-%d1%82 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-23 17:39:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-23 16:39:28 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://fpc.org.uk/?p=5954 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )[6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5811 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2021-05-17 00:11:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-05-16 23:11:25 [post_content] => After almost 30 years of independence, Tajikistan finds itself in a very difficult place, combining extreme poverty with a system that brooks no dissent. Tajikistan’s descent into authoritarianism has taken place gradually but inexorably since the end of the Civil War in 1997 as the President has consolidated power into his own hands and those of his family and close associates, repressing dissent, no matter how minor, with often overwhelming force. Tajikistan now finds itself close to the bottom of the global freedom rankings for political competition, civic space, media and religious freedom as the regime has effectively deployed its multi-track ‘suppress, acquiesce and incorporate’ approach to neutralise alternative voices with a widespread culture of self-censorship. There are real challenges deciding whether, when and how to engage with the country, which come with difficult trade-offs for those involved, where development and human rights imperatives do not always align in the short-term. Western international actors have limited opportunities to influence the situation in a positive direction but it is important that they seek to use what leverage they have to resist further backsliding and put pressure on the regime to curb its excesses. Though diplomatic pressure can sometimes make a difference at the margins, money remains the most important tool available to those seeking to make a difference on the ground. This is both looking at what more can be done to condition or review international aid, investment and lending, as well as taking action where corrupt financial flows from the Tajik elite penetrate the international financial and economic system. Beyond the country there is a lot more to do to protect activists in exile from harassment and extradition by a regime that does not see national borders as a barrier to repression. Key RecommendationsThe Government of Tajikistan should:
  • End the harassment of regime critics at home and abroad, and end the use of torture;
  • Remove laws that prohibit the ‘insult’ of the President and public officials;
  • Limit the application of anti-extremism legislation to prevent its use against political rivals;
  • Address widespread corruption at the heart of the state;
  • Create genuinely independent oversight mechanisms to investigate abuse;
  • End mandatory medical examinations for every citizen seeking to get married and HIV tests as a de facto requirement for many jobs and education institutions;
  • Cease the blocking of websites of independent news outlets;
  • End the propiska system of internal movement registration and restrictions;
  • Make the General Plans of cities more accessible and involve citizens in their development;
  • Reform and expand the listing process for properties of architectural and heritage value; and
  • Develop measures to promote women’s participation in employment and public office, tackle domestic violence, sexual harassment and abuse by law enforcement.
 Western countries and international organisations should:
  • Review investments by International Financial Institutions and aid schemes that provide budget support to the Government of Tajikistan;
  • Implement Magnitsky sanctions and other anti-corruption measures against abusers;
  • Urge social media companies to improve complaint handling and Tajik content moderation;
  • Pause EU efforts to add Tajikistan to the GSP + scheme and create a new Enhanced PCA;
  • Add Tajikistan to the UK’s list of Human Rights Priority Countries; and
  • Improve access to asylum and temporary refuge for Tajiks at risk, including measures to assist family reunification where the relatives of activists have been targeted for abuse.
 

Image by Rjruiziii under (CC).

[post_title] => Retreating Rights – Tajikistan: Executive Summary [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => retreating-rights-tajikistan-executive-summary [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-16 21:19:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-05-16 20:19:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://fpc.org.uk/?p=5811 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )[7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5806 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2021-05-17 00:10:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-05-16 23:10:24 [post_content] => A brief history of TajikistanTajikistan is situated between Kyrgyzstan to the north, Uzbekistan to the west, Afghanistan to the south and China to the east, comprising parts of the Ferganna Valley in the north and the Pamir mountain range. While many cultures had settled the area throughout history the modern Tajik people trace their ancestry back to the Samanid Empire (875-999 AD), who ruled the area from nearby Samarkand and Bukhara, with post-Independence Tajikistan naming its currency, the somoni, after Samanid leader Ismail Samani.[1] Unlike the rest of Central Asia, the Tajik language, given the link back to the Samanids, is closely related to Persian (Farsi) rather than being Turkic in origin. The land that comprises Tajikistan today was gradually taken by the Russian Empire from the Emirate of Bukhara and Khanate of Kokand in the period between 1864 and 1885. During the First World War, opposition to forced conscription helped spark a revolt by the Basmachi movement that would wage both conventional and guerrilla war against both Imperial Russian and then Soviet forces into the early 1920s with the goal of Muslim independence from Russian control in Central Asia. As Soviet control strengthened, the Tajik Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR) was created in 1924 (as part of the Uzbek SSR) and it would ultimately become a full constituent Republic (the Tajik SSR) in 1929 though the then predominantly ethnic Tajik cities of Samarkand and Bukhara would remain part of the Uzbek SSR. In 1985, Communist First Secretary Rahmon Nabiyev was ousted in a corruption scandal and replaced by Qahhor Mahkamov. Mahkamov would become the first President of the Tajik SSR on November 30th 1990 (while it was still within the Soviet Union), but would be forced from office the following August after his support for the attempted coup against Soviet President Gorbachev. His ouster was part of a period of local instability that would set the ground for the coming civil war, amid a swirl of debates around Tajik national identity (leading to the departure of a number of ethnic Russians, Germans and Jews), the role of Islam and evolving local power dynamics.[2] As Tajikistan declared independence on September 9th 1991 (becoming the Republic of Tajikistan) amid a power vacuum Rahmon Nabiyev would soon return to power as Tajikistan’s first elected President in November 1991 representing the Communist party. However, unrest would spiral as different factions looked to take control of the state and its resources leading to the outbreak of Civil War in May 1992 when the President distributed arms to his supporters to encourage them to supress opposition protests taking place in Dushanbe. The myriad factions and local forces would ultimately coalesce into two broad coalitions. The Government faction comprised the Communist party elite, with political strength in the north of the country (Leninabad - now known as Khujand), was able to combine its support with armed groups based in the south-western city (and surrounding area) of Kulob (part of Khatlon region) who dominated the Sitodi Milli (Popular Front of Tajikistan [PFT]). Their opponents, comprised a mix of ethnic Tajik nationalists, democrats (including the Democratic Party which contested the 1991 election against Nabiyev), Islamists (led by the Islamic Renaissance Party of Tajikistan - IRPT), and ethnic groups from the middle of the country (‘Gharmis’ based in the Rasht Valley) and the Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Region (‘Pamiris’), the region to the east of the country dominated by the Pamir Mountain range.[3] President Nabiyev was forced to resign following an ambush by opposition forces in September 1992.[4] By the end of the year a representative of the Kulob grouping, Imomali Rakhmonov (later known as Emomali Rahmon), became Chairman of the Supreme Soviet and de facto head of Government (with the post of President being temporarily abolished), which marked the passing of control from the Leninabadi Communist elites that had still dominated the earlier ‘Government of National Reconciliation’ to the Kulobi armed groups and the ‘Popular Front’. The pro-Government forces were soon able to gain a decisive military advantage, retaking Dushanbe in November-December 1992 from notional opposition control that had been in place since Nabiyev’s ousting in September. The aggressive campaign of violence against opposition supporting regions saw 55,000 houses burned or otherwise destroyed with tens of thousands forced to flee amid bloody battles, including many opposition leaders who fled into exile.[5] The a number of opposition factions that remained would formally coalesce into the United Tajik Opposition (UTO - led by the IRPT’s Said Abdullo Nuri) and continued to fight on, notably from bases in Afghanistan under patronage of the pre-Taliban Government under ethnic Tajik leaders President Burhanuddin Rabbani and General Ahmad Shah Massoud. Uzbekistan, and eventually Russia, played a significant role in bolstering the Government and its forces. The Presidency was revived in November 1994 and during a ceasefire in the Civil War Rakhmonov was elected, beating former Prime Minister Abdumalik Abdullajanov, albeit in a contest where members of the UTO were not able to stand and campaign, and where administrative resources were used to assist the de facto incumbent. The war was brought to a formal close in June 1997 with the ‘General Agreement of Peace and National Reconciliation in Tajikistan’, with the terms of the settlement having been negotiated for the best part of the previous two years.[6] The settlement included the continued and expanded deployment of the UN Mission of Observers in Tajikistan (UNMOT), which had originally been created in 1994 to monitor the earlier ceasefire; an end to the ban of the UTO’s member political parties; a requirement for 30 per cent UTO representation in the executive branch of government (ministries, departments, local government, judicial, and law enforcement bodies); the integration of the UTO’s military units into Tajikistan’s armed forces; provisions for the return of refugees and IDPs; and an act of ‘mutual forgiveness’ and an ‘amnesty act’ that was to release all prisoners of war and pardon all crimes related to the conflict.[7] According to the International Crisis Group over the course of the Civil War between ‘60,000 and 100,000 people were killed, some 600,000 – a tenth of the population – were internally displaced and another 80,000 fled the country’.[8] For several years after the war the Government was not able to fully control certain areas of the country, such as Gharm and the Rasht Valley where local commanders did not accept the peace settlement, leaving banditry to flourish. 1997-2014Although peace had brought the IRPT and other political rivals into the system, Rakhmonov would inexorably consolidate his power over the coming years. He won re-election in 1999 with 97.6 per cent of the vote in an election the main opposition had looked to boycott until shortly before polling began. The People's Democratic Party of Tajikistan, headed by Rakhmonov since 1998, had displaced the Communists as the political vehicle of the ruling elite, winning 15 seats in the 2000 Parliamentary elections to five for the Communists and only two for the IRPT.[9] Rakhmonov’s government ultimately failed to deliver on its pledges to award 30 per cent of Government posts at all levels to former members of the UTO, though at the top the UTO’s Mirzo Ziyoev was appointed to head the Ministry of Emergency Situations and Haji Akbar Turajanzade became the first Vice Prime Minister. The formal amnesty process was also more limited in practice than had been envisaged in the peace accords.[10] However, the authoritarian consolidation had successfully delivered, in the words of John Heathershaw and Parviz Mullojonov, an ‘illiberal peace’ based on an ‘elite bargain’ that shared out the (meagre) resources under state control with those willing to support the regime. Yet, this was a bargain that involved a significant level of risk as the state consolidated and the regime trimmed its size.[11] They note that over time both pro-Government and pro-Opposition warlords of the civil war-era have been frozen out of power and in many cases jailed (including former Democratic Party Leader turned TajikGaz CEO Mahmadruzi Iskandarov) or killed (including Ziyoev in 2009) as power flowed inexorably to the President’s family and those around them.[12] The country remained impoverished, reliant on a mix of remittances, informal cross-border shuttle trading between regional bazaars, international aid and the drugs trade.[13] The latter was a by-product of being positioned to the north of Afghanistan, making it the transit route for about 30 per cent of Afghan opiates for much of this period. In 2001, the drugs trade was equivalent to between 30-50 per cent of Tajikistan’s national income and by 2011 it was generating $2.7 billion a year in illicit revenues, more than other legitimate sources based inside the country (.[14] This provide opportunities for corruption amongst both customs officers and other state officials willing to turn a blind-eye to or actively facilitate the trade, while sucking in international aid and training for the security services to tackle the narcotics trade and improve post-war security, which in turn strengthened the Government’s control over society.[15] The President would win re-election in 2006 and 2013 in elections with no genuine opposition, with the IRPT boycotting the 2006 election and the opposition coalition being unable to obtain the 210,000 supporter signatures required to run in 2013 as the regime transitioned towards full authoritarianism.[16] In his attempts to build a new post-Soviet Tajik identity in 2007, the President amended his surname to Rahmon, removing the Russian framing of his name (including the ‘ov’) and encouraged his fellow countrymen to follow suit, as many officials dutifully did over the years that followed.[17] Over the subsequent years the newly styled President Emomali Rahmon would undertake multiple efforts at derussification of the country’s landmarks and street names and in April 2020, as the world struggled with COVID-19, Tajikistan passed a law banning the use of Russian naming conventions by ethnic Tajiks in new identification documents and for newborn children.[18] As part of efforts to promote the new Tajikistan, from 2011-2014 Dushanbe was recognised as home to the world’s tallest flag pole following its erection in the Presidential Palace (the Palace of Nations) gardens. In 2014, the already restricted political and civic space contracted sharply as Rahmon took urgent action against potential political rivals and other sources of potential challenge in civil society. The political crackdown came at a time when, due to a Russian economic slowdown in 2014-15, remittances dropped dramatically (to $696 million in the first half of 2015, compared with $1.7 billion in the same period in 2014) and thousands of former migrants had returned home.[19] In early October of that year, exiled business man Umarali Quvatov, who had spent time in Moscow, Istanbul and Dubai fending off Tajik extradition attempts, made a public call for a protest rally against the Rahmon Government to be held on October 10th 2014. In what, given the small size of Quvatov’s following, seemed like a panicked reaction on October 5th Facebook, YouTube and hundreds of websites were blocked.[20] Group 24, a political movement (and unregistered party) founded by Quvatov, was then banned by the Supreme Court on October 9th 2014, on grounds of extremism. Unsurprisingly no one attended the putative rally on October 10th, but the authorities decided to stop all SMS text messaging services that day for good measure. 2015 to nowQuvatov was assassinated in Istanbul on March 5th 2015. He, his wife and two sons had been invited to dinner at the home of another Tajik citizen and they became unwell during the dinner (subsequently shown to be poisoning). Quvatov was killed after being shot in the head while waiting in the street for an ambulance to arrive, though his family would recover in hospital.[21] Shortly after Quvatov’s murder, three Group 24 activists in Tajikistan were sentenced to between 16.5 and 17.5 years in prison, while two more were sentenced to between three and three and half years in prison.[22] Emboldened by the success in squashing Group 24, Rahmon’s attention turned to finally banning the old enemy, the IRPT, in a move that abrogated the 1999 peace settlement and which has over the last six years unleashed a new wave of repression focused on IRPT members and alleged supporters both in Tajikistan and abroad. The IRPT had already lost its two seats in the March 2015 Parliamentary Elections and seen its leader, Muhiddin Kabiri, go into self-imposed exile in June 2015 amid rising tensions.[23] The IRPT was told in late August by the Ministry of Justice that it would be deregistered as a political party and that its local branches must close on the pretext that its removal from Parliament meant it was no longer a ‘republican-level’ party, and therefore it should not hold its planned party Congress.[24] On September 4th 2015, violence broke out in Dushanbe with an attack on a military weapons depot, killing 26 people including nine police officers, in what was claimed by the Government to be an attempted coup by Deputy Defense Minister Abduhalim Nazarzoda, who had been an opposition figure in the civil war.[25] Nazarzoda’s antics, which some observers saw as more likely to be an attempt to avoid an imminent arrest as part of the process of ‘regime trimming’ rather than a genuine coup attempt, ended in a violent death for him and his followers.[26] However, the violence acted as a pretext for the Government to ban the IPRT on grounds of extremism, with officials claiming that the IRPT leadership was behind the alleged uprising. 13 leading figures in the IRPT, including Deputy Party Chairmen Mahmadali Hayit and Saidumar Khusaini were detained on September 16th and ultimately sentenced to long prison terms.[27] The UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention would subsequently find Hayit, who was sentenced for life, to be unlawfully imprisoned and called for his release, though he still remains imprisoned and subject to credible claims of torture.[28] By September 29th 2015, the Supreme Court approved the ban making all materials relating to the party (including its website and party newspaper) illegal (and illegal to be accessed) on the grounds of extremism.[29] After this eventful period, with all domestic rivals eliminated, at the end of 2015 Rahmon was bestowed with a new formal title ‘The Founder of Peace and National Unity — Leader of the Nation’.[30] The lawyer defending Hayit and other IRPT defendants, Buzurgmehr Yorov, would subsequently be imprisoned for 23 years as part of a crackdown on anyone seeking to assist or show support for the parties.[31] By summer 2018, over 100 people had been arrested in connection with the IRPT with around 27 receiving prison sentences of between three to 25 years. They included a person - Alijon Sharipov - not previously known as a member who was sentenced to nine and half years for simply liking and sharing party materials on social media.[32] The Government of Tajikistan even attempted to pin the blame for the killing of four Western Cyclists, by a group of self-declared supporters of Islamic State (IS), on the IRPT to considerable international scepticism.[33] For its part in September 2018, the IRPT, along with three other groupings (the Forum of Tajik Freethinkers, the Association of Central Asian Migrants and the People’s Movement ‘Reforms and Development’ in Tajikistan) formed an umbrella opposition movement called the National Alliance of Tajikistan.[34] Such repression has not been restricted to the borders of Tajikistan with opposition activists targeted for harassment, intimidation, and violence well beyond the country’s borders, whilst enormous pressure can be placed on relatives back home to further silence dissidents in exile and urge activists to return home. The Central Asian Exiles database, compiled by the University of Exeter has identified 68 cases where citizens of Tajikistan have been targeted whilst abroad.[35] This is the second highest figure for Central Asia, making it by far the most egregious offender by proportion of population. The topic has been an area of previous research for this author in the 2017 report ‘Closing the Door: the challenge facing activists from the former Soviet Union seeking asylum or refuge’, the 2016 publication ‘No shelter: the harassment of activists abroad by intelligence services from the former Soviet Union’, and 2014’s ‘Shelter from the Storm’.[36] The close security service cooperation and the narrative frame of combatting Islamic terrorism (conflating genuine issues with radicalisation in the diaspora, including support for groups much more radical that the IRPT, with the ongoing efforts to eliminate the political opposition) have enabled multiple cases of extradition from Russia, Turkey and elsewhere in Central Asia, breaching interim measures against extradition passed by the European Court of Human Rights in a number of cases.[37] Those targeted include supporters of both the IRPT and Group 24, with former Group 24 Deputy Leader Sharoffidin Gadoev abducted from a street in Moscow in 2019 by Russian police working with the Tajik security services before being bundled onto a plane back to Dushanbe and apparently being told to call for other activists to return home before he was released and taken back to the Netherlands where he had obtained asylum under intense international pressure.[38] COVID-19As with so many countries around the world COVID-19 exposed some of the central truths about how Tajikistan is governed. The response from the Government of Tajikistan was marked by denial from the top down and a further crackdown on voices who dared to challenge the official narrative.[39] As Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan went into lockdown in mid-March, Rahmon and his officials closed the country’s external borders, but unlike those neighbours the regime took little to no further action in the initial phase of the crisis. Undaunted by the growing global panic Rahmon pressed ahead with mass public gatherings to celebrate Nowruz (March 20th-24th 2020), with rallies and parades taking place without social distancing. The message from the President was that Tajikistan could see off the risk of the virus through the domestic prowess of its citizens who were tasked to keep their homes clean.[40] It was not until April 16th that mass gatherings planned for Capital Day were cancelled and the suspension of Friday prayers in local mosques only started on April 18th.[41] It took until April 30th, shortly before the arrival of a WHO inspection team, for the country to officially record its first cases of COVID-19. COVID denialism was central to the regime’s response, as noted in the essays by Sebastien Peyrouse, Anne Sunder-Plassmann and Rachel Gasowski, as accepting the reality might force a reckoning with the decrepit state of the healthcare system, undermined by mismanagement and corruption, and with the Government’s overall capacity to cope with the crisis. In July 2020, the President signed new legislation prohibiting ‘false’, ‘inaccurate’ and ‘untruthful’ information about the spread of COVID-19, with fines and administrative detention of up to 15 days introduced for violating said legislation.[42] These measures were widely seen as an attempt to chill public discussion about the Government’s handling of the crisis rather than simply to target those creating a potential risk to public health through intentional disinformation. At the time of writing in May 2021, the total number of recorded cases in Tajikistan was 13,308 with only 90 total deaths and no cases recorded in 2021.[43] Rahmon declared the country COVID free at a speech packed with masked officials on January 26th 2021.[44] On paper this would place Tajikistan as one of the world’s top performing countries during the pandemic. However, the reality is understood to be dramatically different. While COVID-19 was officially absent in March and April 2020, there was coincidentally a spike in cases of pneumonia, something the Deputy Minister of Health blamed on exceptionally rainy weather.[45] Officials admitted that in the first half of 2020 the death rate had increased by 11 per cent over the previous year’s period, but insisted that this was due to a coincidental increase in pneumonia, influenza and other respiratory diseases with symptoms not entirely dissimilar from COVID-19.[46] As Peyrouse points out in his essay, the analysis of the data shows that there were 8,650 ‘excess deaths’ in 2020 compared to the year before. He notes that hospitals refused to return the bodies of people who supposedly died of pneumonia to their families, potentially to prevent the families disputing the cause of death. The priority for the Government during the pandemic seemed to be keeping the economy open, given the fragility of the nation’s finances and, as set out in Perouse’s essay, the need for tax revenues to support sectors with links to the ruling elite. Despite the low levels of official COVID cases, Tajikistan has taken emergency funding made available by the international community, with $190 million in new funding provided by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), as well as $53 million in additional funding from the European Union (EU) amongst other support.[47] The regional impact of the pandemic has had a further destabilising effect, crystallising a long held fear of the regime around what to do if former migrant workers returned to the country in large numbers and the level of remittances suddenly dropped. Immediately prior to the pandemic (in late 2019) remittance payments from Russia alone accounted for around 30 per cent of Tajikistan’s GDP (with the number of Tajik migrants in the country believed to be up to one million and who had made $15 billion in formal transfers through the banking system in the period 2013-2018).[48] Russia only reopened its borders to Tajik migrants in late March 2021, but getting plane tickets has been a huge challenge with supply controlled by the Government of Tajikistan. Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL) reported that people had to queue for up to a week to get a ticket and that actual prices can be vastly more than quoted through official sources.[49] The World Bank reports that, due to reduced income and sharp rises in inflation for key items at local markets, hunger increased dramatically with a third of survey respondents reporting having to skip meals.[50] As a result of the pandemic the economy contracted by 4.57 per cent in 2020, leaving GDP per capita at $834 ($3,560 at purchasing power parity), the lowest in Central Asia.[51] The situation today: Corruption and controlIn today’s Tajikistan, the Rahmon family and close associates dominate the political life of the country having consolidated power steadily for almost 30 years, brutally pushing aside both opponents and former allies alike. This gives them almost total control of patronage networks and systems of institutionalised corruption, something Peyrouse describes as the ‘neo-patrimonial nature of its political regime’. The Rahmon regime deploys a threefold strategy of repression, self-censorship and co-option. This is an approach that Edward Lemon, Oleg Antonov and Parviz Mullojonov describe in the field of academia that is equally true across the rest of society, which they characterise as a strategy to suppress dissent, force people to acquiesce to keeping silent and to incorporate others into the regime’s system of power and control. Power has been consolidated to such an extent that any opposition, no matter how insignificant, is perceived as an existential threat to the regime. Threats that could not only put these well-developed rent seeking networks at risk but, given the brutal way the regime has managed to claw its way out of the chaos of civil war and maintain itself in power, would risk the freedom and safety of current regime members were someone else to come to power (whether today’s elite remained in Tajikistan or not). Rahmon has been in control of Tajikistan for almost three decades and was re-elected only in October 2020 but speculation around his future has been rife for some time, with mutterings about his state of health.[52] Many of the President’s actions are now being viewed through the prism of what it means for a potential dynastic succession to the President’s 33 year old son Rustam Emomali. Emomail has served as Mayor of Dushanbe since 2017, having previously been served as the Head of Customs from 2014-17, as well as being Head of the Anti-Corruption Agency and the Head of the Tajik Football Federation. In 2020, he also became Chairman of Tajikistan’s Upper House of Parliament, the Majlisi milli (National Assembly), which comprises representatives of local authorities and other appointed figures. This role formally makes him next in the line of Presidential succession. However, he is not the only family member with factional influence within the regime.[53] For example, the President’s 43 year old daughter Ozoda Rahmon has been serving as Presidential Chief of Staff since 2016 and her husband Jamoliddin Nuraliev is the First Deputy Head of the National Bank of Tajikistan (the country’s central bank). President Rahmon’s son-in-laws and brother-in-laws are believed to have done well out of the regime. Hasan Asadullozoda, the President’s brother-in-law, is Head of Orienbank, Tajikistan’s largest commercial bank (with his niece, the President’s daughter, Zarina Rahmon serving as his deputy) and was described in the 2008 US Cables disclosed by Wikileaks as the third most powerful man in Tajikistan, though other family members have gained in strength since then.[54] He is believed to have commercial interests in aviation, cotton and telecoms, as well as banking.[55] Perhaps the most important asset widely believed to be under Asadullozoda’s control is the Tajikistan Aluminium Corporation (TALCO), the notionally state owned company and the largest legitimate source of income inside the country (equating to 48 per cent of official export revenues in 2008 and using about half the country’s electricity supply at the time).[56] Alexander Cooley and John Heathershaw’s seminal work examining Central Asian kleptocracy, Dictators Without Borders, documents the complicated history of the way in which the regime took control of the company in 2004, something that was the subject of a hugely expensive case in the London courts.[57] The takeover process also involved the Russian firm Rusal, run by Oleg Deripaska, (as well as the Norwegian Firm Hydro). However, the Rusal relationship would turn sour leading to a number of successful international arbitration cases against TALCO, which made information relating to the nature of the regime’s control, including companies registered in the British Virgin Islands, open to the public through court filings.[58] After years of dealing with international entanglements with Russian and Western partners, the Tajik Government is now seeking to use Chinese investment to help modernise and diversify TALCO’s operations.[59] The President’s son-in-law Shamsullo Sohibov, husband of Rukhshona Rahmonova who is an official in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, ran the Faroz conglomerate for many years amongst other related businesses ventures before rumours of its closure in 2019.[60] As it so happens, Faroz was the company founded by assassinated Group 24 leader Umarali Quvatov before Sohibov took control, with the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP) reporting claims that Sohibov forced Quvatov to leave the company.[61] Extensive reporting by RFE/RL suggests that the conglomerate’s constituent businesses have continued to operate despite the notional liquidation of the holding company.[62] The Regime’s modus operandi seem clear that businesses close to the family are given privileged access to key businesses sectors and government contracts with the police, judiciary and security services used to help clear the field, when independent companies become too big or compete with the wrong people.[63] Additionally, as Peyrouse notes in his essay ‘the pharmaceutical sector is largely under the control of presidential family members. Two of the companies which dominate Tajikistan’s pharmaceutical market, Sifat Pharm and Orion-Pharm, are owned respectively by the President’s daughter, Parvina, and his son, Rustam Emomali.’[64] Other interlocutors this author spoke with suggested that the family was rumoured locally to have interests in the licence plate, driving license, taxi hire, medical labs, construction, cement and payroll services sector. As noted above the sole ticket office open in spring 2021 selling flights to Russia for migrant workers just so happened to be owned by a daughter of the President.[65] Some in the President’s wider orbit have been able to retain lucrative positions, though they are believed to be coming under ever increasing competition from the family. Former Tajikistan railways boss Amonullo Hukumatullo was forced into retirement when one of his sons killed three people with his car whilst involved in a street race (a pastime which children of the ruling elite seem fond of) that risked sparking public unrest. However, he has been able to retain his wealth with the OCCRP reporting that he was able to spend $10.6 million in 2018 on luxury properties in the Czech Republic, perhaps due to ties to the first family.[66] Xeniya Mironova’s essay notes the role of the family of Beg Sabur, the head of the Communication Service, one of whose sons is married to Rahmon’s daughter Zarina, in the construction sector.[67] Some, such as former Dushanbe Mayor and National Assembly Chair Mahmadsaid Ubaydulloyev, have been gradually put out to pasture as Rustam Emonmail has taken over his roles. Others, as noted above, have suffered more dramatic falls from grace. At a grassroots level reports have surfaced of increasing police inspections being used to drive low-level corruption while the tax collection system is a longstanding source of contention. The US State Department notes ‘pressure on the Tax Committee to enforce or reinterpret tax regulations arbitrarily in order to meet ever-increasing revenue targets’ based on overly optimistic annual growth targets, leading to local tax officials having to find ways to boost returns to hit nationally set projections.[68] The OCCRP suggest that the size of the unregulated shadow economy is around 20 per cent of size of the economy as a whole, with a desire to avoid tax pressure being listed as a key reason not to declare earnings and around 30 per cent of businesses admitting to paying bribes to tax collectors to avoid paying the full amount to the treasury.[69] Tajikistan ranks 149th in the world (out of 180) in the 2020 Transparency Corruptions Perceptions Index, the second worst performer in Central Asia after Turkmenistan, and 116th out of 137 in the Bertlsemann Transformation Index Governance Index.[70] Political and human rights situationAs should be clear from the information provided above, the political environment has transitioned over the last 20 years from a semi-authoritarian system in which rival political movements were allowed to exist but not truly challenge the structures of power to a fully authoritarian one where everything is subordinate to the regime. Freedom House currently ranks the country 198th out of 210 in its Freedom in the World index, with a score of 0 for political rights.[71] The October 2020 Election was ultimately contested between five pro-Government candidates, with Rahmon winning 92 per cent of the vote.[72] It is worth underscoring that while the four other candidates were able to meet the onerous registration requirements, ostensibly obtaining the requisite 245,000 signatures (five per cent of the eligible electorate - meaning that the equivalent figure for a country like the UK would be 2.38 million) between August 6th and September 10th, none of them got close to obtaining as many votes as signatures they had presumably received (with Rahmon’s closest rival getting only 128,182 votes).[73] In an unusual move, 30 year old lawyer and member of the Gorno-Badakhshan provincial council, Faromuz Irgashev announced on social media that he was planning to run for President. The next day he was visited by the security services for a little chat.[74] While he says he was able to obtain 70,000 signatures (more than the number of votes the Communist Party and the Socialist Party would receive in the actual election) his candidacy was rejected by the election commission due to the signature requirements and legal restrictions barring independent candidates from standing. The small Social Democratic Party of Tajikistan (SDTP), the only officially registered opposition party left in the country, had decided not to stand and instead called for a boycott of the elections. Nevertheless the party’s leader, Rakhmatillo Zoyirov, was attacked on September 22nd by unknown assailants receiving a broken arm.[75] Pressure on those with links to the IRPT also took place ahead of the vote with the arrest of Jaloliddin Mahmudov and the three sons of IRPT founding member Said Kiemitdin Gozi.[76] Gozi had been killed in prison in 2019 as part of a riot by IS members which claimed the lives of 29 people and just so happened to include Gozi, another IRPT figure and a non-IS cleric critical of the regime.[77] Pressure on regime critics and those who might have a base of support independent of the President have continued unabated since the election. In late March 2021 a popular Moscow-based NGO activist, Izzat Amon, who ran the Center for Tajiks of Moscow that provided support for the large diaspora community within Russia, was abducted and ultimately transferred back to Tajikistan in murky circumstances. His Russian citizenship was revoked, despite the Russian courts initially denying they were involved, with criminal charges for fraud awaiting him on his forced arrival in Dushanbe.[78] As to why Amon was rendered back to Tajikistan a number of potential reasons have been suggested including his periodic social media criticism of the regime and that back in 2019 he had flirted with founding a political party (which when allied to his popularity amongst the migrant communities could be seen as a political risk), though others have pointed to a possible (limited) past sympathy for the IRPT prior to its banning in 2015.[79] It has also been suggested that it was actually the Russians who had lost patience with Amon’s activism against their treatment of the Tajik diaspora.[80] The Amon case again underscores the close working relationship between the Russian authorities and the Tajik State Committee for National Security (SCNS), based on both a shared approach to political dissent and genuine concerns about radicalisation in the diaspora community including links to violent groups such as IS (Tajiks made up the largest number of fighters for IS other than Syrians and Iraqis).[81] However, for many years the fight against extremism has provided both the Tajik and Russian security services a pretext to deport (both through legal and illegal means) avowedly non-violent activists to Tajikistan. More broadly, and as documented in earlier publications by this author, Tajikistan uses the Interpol system as a means to try and force the return of political opponents, with Western governments sometimes willing to go along with the requests or oblivious to the potential consequences.[82] In the case of alleged IRPT member, Hizbullo Shovalizoda, the Austrian Government rejected his asylum claim and deported him back to Tajikistan. Though the Austrian Supreme Court would ultimately strike down the decision, citing the procedural violations and a lack of relevant information about the current human rights situation in Tajikistan when the initial decision was made, by this point Shovalizoda was already in Tajikistan serving a 20 year sentence for membership of a banned group and related charges.[83] As discussed earlier, pressure on family members of exiled activist remains a common feature of the regime’s approach to dissent. Humayra Bakhtiyar, a former journalist with ASIA-Plus, has faced pressure on her family with her father and brothers’ jobs being threatened by police if she did not return home.[84] The day before activist Shabnam Khudoydodova spoke at a session at the OSCE ODHIR’s Human Dimension conference her nine year old daughter, living with her grandparents in Tajikistan, was faced with a mob of students, teachers, local officials and a TV crew who came to her classroom to denounce her as a ‘daughter of a terrorist' and 'enemy of the people' before chasing her home. The following day Khudoydodova’s niece was physically attacked by another mob. In late November 2020, the father and brother of Fatkhuddin Saidmukhidinov were interrogated by the SCNS and told to pressure Saidmukhidinov to shut down his social media accounts, YouTube channel and blog, as well as not to associate with other opposition activists. The SCNS also used his previous participation at the OSCE ODHIR’s Human Dimension conference as evidence of malfeasance.[85] The goal is very clear, to completely isolate activists and pressure them to quit wherever they are in the world. This include sending clear warnings against trying to help anyone who has been active against the state not only for their jobs, livelihoods and freedoms, with warnings that relatives would be prosecuted. Even the elderly are not immune from these pressures as in the case of Doniyor Nabiev, an 80 year old former IRPT member, was arrested in August 2020 and subsequently jailed for seven years for providing a small amount of financial assistance to the families of political prisoners.[86] As Favziya Nazarova and Nigina Bakhrieva show in their essay, torture and abuse (including sexual abuse) by law enforcement officials, in police custody and in prisons is a significant problem. The topic remains one of the few areas where local human rights defenders are allowed to be active, with an anti-torture coalition that is to some extent able to conduct their own local investigations (sometimes in conjunction with the Office of the Human Rights Ombudsman) in the absence of any independent access for the International Committee of the Red Cross or other bodies to prisons and other places of detentions.  Despite recommendations by the UN Committee Against Torture (CAT), the Human Rights Committee (HRC) and the Special Rapporteur on torture there are no truly independent mechanisms capable of investigating and prosecuting abuses, with the existing Ombudsman only resolving two per cent of cases (of any type) brought to it.[87] The UN CAT have also criticised the lack of independence and capacity in the Ombudsman’s office.[88] Civil societyIn the post-Civil War period, Tajikistan’s civil society became a focus of international attention with a range of both international NGOs and donor support to local initiatives working to try and rebuild the country and address its challenges in the aftermath of the civil war. This context, and that of a still consolidating regime, gave some space for civic freedoms both within NGOs and in wider society (including academia). A number of International NGOs continue to have a presence in the country to this day working on development projects (including water and sanitation and poverty reduction) and peacebuilding initiatives. For example, UK NGOs, such as Oxfam, Save the Children, Saferworld and International Alert, have presence in the country.[89] Even the Open Society Foundations has been able to retain an office in the country unlike many other places in Central Asia.[90] However, as the regime consolidated its control the civic space has shrunk with the regime continuing to deploy its ‘suppress, acquiesce and incorporate’ strategy as outlined above. What it has left is a sector walking on egg shells having to be ever more careful about what they can and cannot say; trying to stay inside the ever tightening lines of what is permissible conduct; mindful of which lines the regime will not allow to be crossed, lines that may move at any point; and keenly aware of the grim fate that can await those who incur the regime’s displeasure. Direct criticism of the President, his family or of certain aspects of the nature of the regime remains off-limits for those seeking to avoid closure of their organisations or even worse. The country’s extreme poverty still provides a range of opportunities, for both local and international civil society, to work to improve the lives of citizens of Tajikistan in ways that are not directly confrontational to the regime. However, for those working in more rights based fields, the focus has had to be narrowed towards topics that are seen as less controversial, such as supporting children with disabilities, or that fall within the few areas - such as the work of the Freedom from Torture coalition - where some space is still allowed for criticism of practical failings, legislation and issues with lower level systems while carefully avoiding more thorny political questions. So rather than go down the route taken by Uzbekistan under Karimov that saw independent NGOs closed down or kicked out as the regime tightened its grip, Tajikistan has kept many of these groups in situ. This enables the Government to point to their presence as evidence of continuing good faith, retaining the leverage provided by the potential threat of future closure as a disincentive for increased international criticism, whilst ensuring international funding continues to reach the country. This creates a dilemma for a number of international organisations that have to exercise a degree of self-censorship, or at least deliberate stay clear of potentially controversial activities, in order to retain a formal presence on the ground. At the moment estimates suggest around 2,800-3,000 NGOs are still officially registered, as legally required, with Tajikistan’s Ministry of Justice, although some of these seem to be fairly inactive to the point of no longer being operational. The current Law on Public Associations sets a number of reasonably heavy bureaucratic operational requirements on NGOs including requirements to make public detailed financial statements on their websites (which they are required to have by law despite many not being able to afford one), but perhaps the most important section pertains to registration and approval of foreign funding. [91] According to ‘Article 27 Sources of Formation of Property of a Public Association Section 2’, all foreign funding is subject to registration with the Register of Humanitarian Assistance to Public Associations of the Republic of Tajikistan, a requirement that the Tajik Government claims is part of their anti-terrorism efforts but which gives an effective state veto over projects it does not want to see proceed. A 2019 report by the Observatory for the Protection of Human Rights Defenders documented in detail how inspections by the tax authorities, the Ministry of Justice (in the case of NGO’s registered as ‘Public Associations’) and other state bodies are used as a tool for harassing NGOs and their supporters.[92] Given the economic situation and nature of political control opportunities for growing their domestic revenue base is limited, with significant risks involved for potential local donors. Beyond the formal NGO sector, Parviz Mullojonov’s essay highlights how the pandemic has helped to catalyse new forms of societal mobilisation with informal associations and groups organised online helping to raise money and provide volunteers to help in areas that augmented the capacity of both the state and traditional NGOs. It will be important to see how this develops over the coming year and the extent to which they are able retain their freedom of action that some in the state clearly fear. This community self-organising builds on the traditions of ‘hashar’, collective communal labour (albeit sometimes pressured at the behest of local officials) that had often been used in the past to fill in gaps in state provision.[93] Media freedomAs with other freedoms in Tajikistan the media freedom situation has deteriorated substantially in recent years, with their ranking in the Reporters without Borders Wold Press Freedom Index deteriorating from 115th out of 180 countries in 2014 to 162nd in 2021.[94] For now the ASIA-Plus New Agency remains the only broadly independent local outlet (comprising a website, news service, Radio station and newspaper), albeit observing a degree of self-censorship.[95] However, their website has been blocked by the Government for much of the last two years, with the OSCE noting that this also took place during the 2020 Presidential election campaign.[96] In December 2020, they were told they had to vacate their offices in a building ultimately owned by the Government.[97] Other independent outlets have been pressured to disband such as Ozodagon, an independent newspaper, which was forced to close in 2019 after years of harassment.[98] In February 2020, the independent news website Akhbor.com was formally banned by the Supreme Court of Tajikistan on the grounds of providing a “platform for terrorist and extremist organisations” by including coverage of exiled opposition groups, such as the IRPT, as part of a range of issues it reported on.[99] This followed two years previously where it was only available via VPN due to extensive attempts to block the website from the internet in Tajikistan.[100] The site made the decision to close down as of November 2020 due to a mix of further pressure on the organisation, including targeting the founder Mirzo Salimpur’s family, and the risks posed to those reading the site who would be at risk of prosecution.[101] In the aftermath of the closure of Akhbor a new Prague-based news website, Bomdod.com, has been created with a similar mix of news coverage. YouTube and other social media platforms contain newly emerging channels being run from the diaspora that can attract a local following as part of a wider cat and mouse game with the security services. However, the internet remains both slow and expensive, albeit with free data for certain social media apps included as part of mobile phone packages.[102] Television (both state and private) and local print journalism remains very much under the control of the regime. For a number of years in the 2010s, RFE/RL’s Tajik service Radio Ozodi (whose YouTube channel has 1.39m subscribers, Instagram page 1.1m and 315,484 followers on Facebook) has faced real challenges finding the right balance on the tightrope walk between maintaining the ability to operate on the ground in Tajikistan and the ability to speak openly.[103] After several years when murmurings of disquiet could be heard, the service came under sustained criticism in 2019 around allegations that Tajik service director, Sojida Djakhfarova, and Abbas Djavadi, the director of programming for Central Asia, were squashing some critical stories about the ruling family and preventing reporting about the IRPT and other exiled groups. There were also allegations of links to the business empire of Hasan Asadullozoda, including a contract given to an Asadullozoda-linked Radio Station and the local Ozodi offices being based in a building allegedly owned by him.[104] Djakhfarova and Djavadi would resign shortly after the story broke in Eurasianet amid public pressure from international experts on the country (including Edward Lemon who writes in this collection).[105] While the detailed allegations made by Eurasianet and the academics strongly suggest a pattern of behaviour by these editors that went beyond self-censorship merely to retain a formal presence on the ground (unlike in Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan where they have to operate covertly), in the wake of the reforms at Ozodi, the channel’s local staff have been subjected to increased efforts by the authorities to withhold or delay issuing press accreditation to its journalists in Tajikistan.[106] On a separate issue around the Government of Tajikistan influencing the behaviour of international organisations to limit scrutiny, Tajikistan played a leading role in blocking the extension of the mandates for OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media, Harlem Desir, and the head of the OSCE's Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR), Ingibjorg Solrun Gisladottir, after both organisations raised criticisms of the poor human rights record in the country.[107] The essay contribution by Anne Sunder-Plassmann and Rachel Gasowski further highlights the challenges faced by journalists trying to navigate their way through the system. They note how journalists are subject to what they describe as ‘prophylactic conversations’ with the security services to push them to toe the Government line, with threats of revoking accreditation, media licences, extra tax checks, pressure on family members and potential criminal or civil prosecution if they do not comply. Sunder-Plassmann and Gasowski note that despite the partial removal of criminal defamation in 2012, the legislation still punishes ‘public insult or defamation of the President of Tajikistan’ and ‘insulting the Leader of the Nation through the media through print, online or other media’, with up to five years’ imprisonment and with a potential two year sentence for ‘insult of a public official’. They also note the broad provisions and often arbitrary application of restrictions on terrorism and extremism as well as Article 189 of the Criminal Code which punishes ‘inciting national, racial, local or religious discord’ with sentences of up to 12 years, the potential application of which is used to silence reporting and other forms of dissent.[108] In recent years there have been a number high profile cases of journalists that have attracted international attention. Khairullo Mirsaidov, an investigative journalist and satirist, was initially arrested in December 2017 following an open letter he published criticising officials in his local Sughd region. The initial judgement came down with a sentence of 12 years in prison for embezzlement, however after an international campaign using the slogan #FreeKhayrullo, the authorities released him on appeal, though the courts left $8,500 in fines, a requirement to do community service and to give the state one fifth of his salary for two years as conditions of his release.[109] Mirsaidov would ultimately breach those conditions by fleeing to Georgia, then Poland and was sentenced to an eight month prison term in absentia.[110] In 2020, a similar international outcry followed the arrest of former Ozodagon journalist Daler Sharipov, who was held on extremism charges for his writing about religious freedom issues, discussing banned opposition groups and for possessing material said to be related to the Muslim Brotherhood, which is banned in Tajikistan.[111] Sharipov ultimately would serve out the one year term, despite pressure from the US Senate and other international bodies.[112] Humayra Bakhtiyar, a former ASIA-Plus journalist mentioned above, has faced not only significant pressure on her family who remain in Tajikistan but a concerted online smear campaign over several years.[113] She has faced smear campaign first from fake accounts on Facebook (2013-15), then pro-Government young people (2015-17), including from students who are potentially paid to troll, and then ultimately pressure from diasporan voices (who may have been persuaded to do it to be removed from the blacklist or for money). These online smear and harassment attempts, as Oleg Antonov, Edward Lemon and Parviz Mullojonov note in their essay, can often be linked to what is known as the fabrikai javob (‘the factory of answers’). As the authors point out the Government has ‘enlisted the support of ‘volunteers’ in its mission to police the web’ particularly teachers, professors and government employees who are pressured or paid to create fake accounts to criticise the opposition. The RFE/RL investigation that exposed the system suggested that, in 2019, there were likely to be at least 400 members are involved in the troll factory, known as the ‘Analytical Information Group’ within the Ministry of Education.[114] The factory of answers was known to be active in response to try to discredit journalists reporting within the country, such as Abdullo Gurbati, as well attempting to discredit erstwhile young presidential candidate Faromuz Irgashev.[115] Rule of lawAs will be clear from the above, the nature of state power and capacity means there are significant problems in relation to the rule of Law in Tajikistan. The International Commission of Jurists report, ‘Neither Check nor Balance: The Judiciary in Tajikistan’, sets out how past efforts to reform the judiciary have yielded limited results. They point out the almost total lack of acquittals in the criminal courts, and they show how the low pay amongst the judiciary leaves them open to corruption and that the mechanisms for promotion are open to abuse by those in power. The Commission, therefore, argues for reducing the power of court presidents and increasing the activity and independence of the Association of Judges.[116] As with many legal systems in Central Asia the Prosecutor General’s Office plays a dominant role in the system with the courts generally following the approach set out by prosecutors. While policing suffers from, as the US Government puts it, a ‘lack of resources, low salaries, and inadequate training [which] contribute to high corruption and a lack of professionalism among law enforcement agencies’.[117] While the SCNS often takes the lead in dealing with critics of the regime, focused on preventing any challenge to the status quo. As already noted, human rights lawyers and others defending regime opponents have been subject to relentless pressure, including in multiple cases arrest and imprisonment themselves because of who they defended.[118] These included 2011 Human Rights Defender of the year Shukhrat Kudratov, ultimately released after four years but now banned from practicing law.[119] ReligionThe legacy of the civil war, the secular-nationalist framing Tajik identity by the Rahmon regime, the repression of Islamically-minded political movements, genuine issues with radicalisation (the civil war, proximity with Afghanistan and the domestic situation all being factors) and an ingrained hostility to activities outside of state supervision or control creates an extremely restrictive atmosphere for religious freedom in the country. The US Commission on International Religious Freedom lists Tajikistan as one of its 14 Countries of Particular Concern noting that the ‘Tajikistani government’s already dismal record on religious freedom continues to deteriorate’.[120] Official, state sanctioned religious activity is supervised by the State Committee on Religious Affairs who oversee the Islamic Council of Ulema, the grouping of religious leaders who coordinate religious activity for the majority Sunni Muslim population. The changes to the system in 2010 removed a tier of regional religious leadership which helped make local Imams more dependent on secular state structures.[121] The majority of Parmiris of the Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Region are followers of the Ismaili religious tradition and so far some independence has been tolerated with the Aga Khan Foundation (founded and run by the Ismaili’s global religious leader) a major player in the development of the region. [122] The practice of official Islam in Tajikistan comes with a number of restrictions. Under 18s are only allowed to attend Mosques at religious festivals and funerals, excluding them from regular Friday prayer.[123] Mosque building is significantly restricted with many forced to close, and state backed religious schools were also shut down over the last decade.[124] As with a number of its Central Asian neighbours a de facto ban on hijab wearing in public places is in effect through dress code restrictions in places of education and throughout the public sector, in addition to informal pressure from the police and other officials cracking down on signs of overt religiosity that can sometimes include forcing men to trim or cut off long beards.[125] The extent of this informal enforcement is lower in rural than urban areas. As set out earlier, religious groupings that fall outside state control can be dealt with brutally. For Muslims this not only includes political supporters of the (relatively politically moderate) IRPT, supporters of banned non-violent extremist groups such as Hizb ut-Tahrir (subject to major crackdowns particularly in the 2000s) and the Muslim Brotherhood (117 suspected members were given sentences of between five to 23 years in April 2021), through to supporters of violent extremism and armed groups such as the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, Al-Qaeda and IS.[126] Proselytising Protestant groups and Jehovah's Witnesses also face similar pressure from the state, amid restrictions on registration of religious groups that prevent many independent religious groups being legally recognised.[127] Jehovah's Witnesses are also subject to prosecution in cases of contentious objection from compulsory service in Tajikistan’s armed forces.[128] So in Rahmon’s secular-nationalist vision for Tajikistan devout Islam is frowned upon and often restricted by the authorities. However, cultural or ‘popular’ Islam, where Islam is a social identifier, a component of Tajik national identity and root for support of traditionalism and cultural conservativism (without a commitment to regular prayer or strict observance to religious laws) remains much more widespread and accepted by the authorities.[129] Women’s and minority rightsTraditional and secular-conservative attitudes to issues of gender and sexuality are widespread across society in Tajikistan and part of the President’s approach to building a post-Soviet Tajik identity. One example of this approach that is indicative of wider trends is the way International Women’s day on March 8th, celebrated in Tajikistan during the Soviet-era, was rebranded in 2009 by the Government as ‘Mother’s day’, reflecting how women presented are portrayed primarily as mothers and carers by state institutions as well as in the dynamics of many local communities.[130] Women’s representation in official positions remains relatively low in Tajikistan, though better than in some of its neighbours. 14 Women deputies sit in the 63 member Assembly of Representatives, the Lower House of Parliament.[131] Eight of the 31 member National Assembly (the Upper House of Parliament) are women, while three members of the Cabinet are women - Deputy Prime Minister Sattoriyon Amonzoda, the Minister of Labour, Migration and Employment Amonzoda Shodi, and Minister of Culture Davlatzoda Davlat.[132] Early marriage is a common feature of life in Tajikistan amid heavy social pressure. Though the legal marriage age was raised to 18 in 2011, girls being pushed into Islamic marriages unrecognised by the state is still a problem particularly in rural communities as well as some cases of bride kidnapping and forced marriage.[133] The median age of first marriage for women is 20.2 years.[134] At marriage women are usually expected to move into her husband’s household to help care for the wider family under the control of their parents-in-law, with the greatest pressures on the youngest wife (arus). The precarious employment situation acts in multiple different ways on women. The dearth of local opportunities creates a degree of social pressure against women joining the local labour force. However, the clear majority of Tajikistan’s labour migrants are men which means that in rural communities this has seen women take a greater role in managing both ‘kitchen gardens’ and ‘dekhan’ farms.[135] Professional childcare for infants below school age is in short supply and often unaffordable for many families, acting as a further barrier to women’s participation in the work force. In relation to the hijab, the state actively promotes and de facto enforces conservative but secular modes of dress for women (an informal Clothing Code), with the Ministry of Culture publically promoting campaigns against wearing black, the hijab or short skirts, whilst promoting traditional national dress. In their essay, Favziya Nazarova and Nigina Bakhrieva outline the harrowing physical, sexual and psychological abuse some women face in the criminal justice system (as suspects, victims and witnesses) and how attitudes in wider society lead victims to be shamed and shunned. More broadly domestic violence is an issue that both the Tajik Government and a significant part of society seeks to downplay. A 2016 survey by the Government in collaboration with Oxfam found that 97 per cent of men and 72 per cent of women believed domestic violence should be tolerated in order to prevent a family from breaking apart.[136] The Government does not undertake fully comprehensive reporting of complaints of domestic violence, but NGOs have been monitoring increasing numbers of reported cases and the issue is beginning to be talked about more in public amongst younger people.[137] Similarly women are beginning to speak out more openly against endemic issues of sexual harassment, albeit with a very mixed response from the authorities.[138] Dilbar Turakhanova’s essay notes the development of a new anti-discrimination law but argues that implementation will be critical with a need for large scale public information campaigns, quotas for political participation, new opportunities for professional advancement as well as mentoring and support networks for younger women professionals. While homosexuality was decriminalised in 1998, unlike in Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan where it remains illegal, the LGBTQ community in Tajikistan still faces systemic discrimination and strong family and social pressures to keep identities hidden.[139] There are no local NGOs able to operate openly to advocate for rights and protections for LGBTQ people in a system with no legal framework for tackling discrimination against the community. Police and local officials have been known, in the words of the International Partnership for Human Rights, to have ‘beaten, raped and exploited’ members of the community.[140] Abuses include forcing LGBTQ citizens to have medical examinations (on the grounds of limiting the spread of sexually transmitted disease), sexual and physical abuse, blackmail and extortion (including use of honey traps to target richer members of the community). There have been repeated claims, denied by authorities, that the officials have created a register of LGBTQ citizens on the grounds of potential risk of spreading HIV.[141] HousingAs discussed above and in the essays by Xeniya Mironova and Shoira Olimova, suspected corruption at a state and local level and the politically connected nature of businesses in the construction industry help to shape a sector that is struggling to meet the needs of ordinary people. In Dushanbe, and to a certain extent in other major cities, the rapid pace of physical change has sometimes ridden roughshod over both the city’s urban heritage, with the rights of residents coming behind those of powerful interests. The rebuilding of the urban landscape is part of the Government’s approach to projecting a modern image of Tajikistan, using substantial amounts of Chinese and Saudi Arabian investment, by bulldozing particularly Soviet-era building to replace them with new construction, a process of nation building through building.[142] As well as replacing crumbling apartment blocks to build taller new blocks (of varying build quality) the authorities have torn down popular buildings such as the Mayakovsky Theatre and Jomi Cinema and have been slow to replace them. [143] The Shahmansur market (known locally as the Green Bazaar) was demolished in 2017 possibly to reduce competition for the newly opened Achaun shopping mall nearby.[144] The country would benefit from developing an effective system for comprehensively listing and protecting properties of architectural and heritage value before the bulldozers have taken it all as, despite public pressure, the authorities in Dushanbe have only identified a list of 15 buildings in the whole city as being worthy of heritage protection.[145] As our authors note, while issues around illegal demolition and forced evictions can still be a problem, the situation is less acute than several years ago. The regime has, to some extent, recognised the issue as a potential mobiliser for discontent so for the most part it has been ensuring that at least some compensation is paid even if the processes through which regeneration happens remain opaque. As Mironova argues the ‘authorities should organise public hearings on the reconstruction and redevelopment of the Tajik capital and other towns and ensure that civil society has access to the General Plans (Masterplans) of Dushanbe and other towns’ respectively. More information should also be formally provided about which companies undertaking particular projects in-order to help trace lines of accountability. Mironova also notes the continuing problems around the ‘propiska’ system where people have to register their residency in their local area with the local police. Without such registration it can be difficult to access medical assistance, education, get a bank account or even buy a mobile phone sim card. The registration process currently discriminates against those unable to purchase their own homes in the places where they are living and working with the ability to register at temporary addresses a mixed picture. Currently the process provides further opportunities for police corruption.[146] Border conflicts The collapse of the Soviet Union into different nation states posed particular new challenges for the ethnically intermixed communities in and around the Fergana Valley. Prior to independence the administrative borders of the SSRs had limited real impact on the ground, with a shared currency, a shared language in common (Russian), economic and transport links, and other infrastructure that had no need to break down rigidly on national lines. At independence there were significant challenges identifying precisely where the borders actually lay (including in the middle of roads) and exacerbated issues around the complicated nature of local control. Tajikistan has two exclaves, Vorukh and Lolazor (formerly Kayragach), which are entirely surrounded by the territory of Kyrgyzstan as well as Sarvak that is inside Uzbekistan. As time has passed the provision of new national level infrastructure focused on connecting people within the same country, economic shifts away from shared market places and a common currency, and the decline of Russian as a shared language all have helped to reduce organic (friendly) people-to-people contact. In recent years there has been particular volatility on the Tajikistan-Kyrgyzstan border with low level violence amongst citizens over local issues, sometimes joined by respective border guards in small skirmishes. The guards have also periodically attempted occasionally to extort money from nationals of the other country. Only 519km of the 972km Tajikistan-Kyrgyzstan border have been delimited and demarcated at the present time.[147] Since the new Government in Kyrgyzstan came to power last autumn, it has been making noises about wanting to resolve its outstanding border disputes with its neighbours, responding in part to initiatives put forward by Uzbekistan’s President Mirziyoyev. In fact an agreement on resolving issues on the Uzbek-Kyrgyz border was proudly announced in late March by Kyrgyzstan’s Security Chief Kamchybek Tashiev, who said: “Issues around the Kyrgyz-Uzbek border have been resolved 100 percent. We have tackled this difficult task. There is not a single patch of disputed territory left.”[148] In practice this agreement swiftly unravelled due to pressure from local Kyrgyz who had not been consulted on the moves. Also in late March, Tashiev made a public offer to swap 12,000 hectares of land in the Kyrgyz province of Batken in return for Tajikistan transferring Vorukh to Bishkek’s control, remarks that were shortly followed by Kyrgyz military exercises near the areas in question.[149] Rahmon publically rejected this plan in a visit to Vorukh in early April designed to reassure residents of Dushanbe’s commitment to them.[150] This public wrangling over the issue of status provides context for the most violent clashes ever between the two countries. The spark came on April 28th 2021 in a dispute between locals in the Isfahra (Tajikistan) and Batken (Kyrgyzstan) regions over a camera being placed by local Tajiks (on land within the territory of Tajikistan) to monitor a water intake station (in Kyrgyzstan) that is part of the irrigation system that serves both countries. There had been concerns raised about local Kyrgyz potentially making changes to the water supply in a way that might negatively impact what water made it to Tajik land. Water is a critical resource in a country where only 36 per cent of the population has access to safe drinking water and irrigation systems are essential to enable marginal agricultural land to be suitable for farming, making it a regular flash point in local disputes.[151] What was unusual in this instance in April 2021 was the scale of the response, in particular from the Government of Tajikistan, perhaps stung by public debate over its control in the region. The following morning (April 29th) gunfire was exchanged across the border which then rapidly escalated to clashes at 17 sites across the Kyrgyzstan-Tajikistan border as Tajikistan mobilised its regular military to make incursions into Kyrgyzstan with the firing of mortars, rockets from helicopter gunships and the use of heavy armour. While properties were destroyed on both sides of the border the majority of the damage has been on the Kyrgyz side.[152] While the press in Kyrgyzstan, who despite recent pressures are still considerably freer than their Tajik counterparts, were able to actively report on the destruction on their side of the border and publically pressure their Government to react, Tajikistan was far slower to publically acknowledge what had taken place and reticent to give official casualty figures, leaving the space open for rumours and accusations online about precisely what happened and who had lost their lives. By May 6th official statements by both sides put the death toll at 36 killed on the Kyrgyz side and 19 on the Tajik side many of whom were civilians (including children), with 58,000 Kyrgyz initially evacuated from the region.[153] Despite the loss of life the international community’s official response was muted, though Rahmon’s public presence at Russia’s Victory day parade on May 9th (celebrating victory in World War II) was seen as a public endorsement of the Tajik leader by Putin.[154] In the wake of the violence both sides undertook a series of deportations and expulsions of the opposing ethnicity, both students studying in universities and dual citizens. While a number of people in border regions hold citizenship of both countries, it is in breach of legislation of both countries (with Kyrgyzstan rejecting dual citizenship with neighbouring countries and Tajikistan recognising only Tajik-Russian dual citizenship) and this had been an ongoing issue prior to the recent flare-up.[155] International relationsTajikistan’s international relations are primarily centred around its relations with Russia and China. As set out above remittances from Russia provide a substantial portion of Tajikistan’s GDP while China is the biggest single international investor and the holder of around half the country’s external debt.[156] Tajikistan is a member of the Russian-led Collective Security Treaty Organization and Shanghai Cooperation Organisation both help underscore substantial security service collaboration, based on a shared understanding on defining extremism to include a range of political opponents and more recently with the growing use Chinese surveillance technology.[157] Both Russia and China have military bases in the country. As yet it has, however, not joined the Russia centred Eurasian Economic Union (to which Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan are members but not key transit partner Uzbekistan), something that would substantially cut Tajikistan’s revenues from customs fees but would make things easier for migrant labourers, a source of current friction following the pandemic.[158] Unlike its counterparts in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan, the Rahmon regime is relatively disinterested in courting Western and other international public opinion. Also compared to their neighbours, less of the ruling elite’s money is channelled to the US or UK property markets with Dubai and Moscow destinations of choice.[159] Tajikistan does not have much in the way of natural resources or other economic opportunities that would attract Western Investors. It is the low income country’s huge development challenges and post-conflict stabilisation needs, as well as efforts to tackle radicalisation and drug smuggling that risk exporting problems beyond its borders that have meant Western partners have remained to some degree engaged despite the country’s problems. It is these funding flows that provide some of the few (limited) levers of influence over regime performance and behaviour. Total Official Overseas Development Aid (ODA) spending on development projects totalled $372.350 million in 2019, though much of the investment by China and the Gulf States falls outside this formal framework.[160] The EU and its member states provide around 40 per cent of all Tajikistan’s Official ODA, including 63 per cent of all funding for primary healthcare facilities as well as projects for children with disabilities and teacher training.[161] It is worth noting that the EU did reduce its planned investments in the 2014-2020 budget cycle by around 100 million euros due to the failure of the Tajik Government to meet its commitments.[162] Progress on creating a new ‘Enhanced’ Partnership and Cooperation Agreement with Tajikistan, requested by Tajikistan in 2019, is currently going very slowly, with the timeline for a decision on formally opening the negotiations still delayed from the second half of 2020.[163] The US describes its relationship with Tajikistan as being based on ‘such areas as counter-narcotics, counterterrorism, non-proliferation, and regional economic connectivity and security’.[164] Its engagement has been particularly shaped in the context of longstanding US commitments in Afghanistan and Tajikistan’s name has even recently appeared on a long-list of potential sites for a new US military base after its withdrawal from Afghanistan though its CSTO and SCO memberships make it a far from unproblematic choice even before local governance problems are considered.[165] The UK’s Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO- which has taken over the UK’s aid functions from DFID) has had a longstanding presence in the country working on development projects, though it is unclear at time of writing what impact the current substantial cuts to UK ODA spending will have on its involvement in the country, including its partnerships with UK-based international NGOs. The international financial institutions themselves are the biggest donors to Tajikistan with the World Bank ($152,561 million), Asian Development Bank ($50.934m) and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development ($28.814m) as three of the top five aid spenders in 2020.[166] As noted above, the COVID response included a boost in available funding from both the World Bank, Asian Development Bank and also from the IMF, which provided around $190m in emergency funding, and the Kazakhstan-based Eurasian Development Bank.[167] Tajikistan sharply illustrates not only some of the challenges of working in a country with significant levels of poverty, poor governance and endemic corruption, but also some of the difficult trade-offs between development and human rights objectives. International organisations that wish to retain their ability to work on the ground have to exercise a degree of self-censorship, or at least deliberate stay clear of potentially controversial activities, which has the unfortunate by-product of helping to legitimate the political system that currently operates in Tajikistan. The publication’s conclusions address this difficult balancing act and try to suggest some potential ways forward. Image by Rjruiziii under (CC). [1] Kamoludin Abdullaev and Catherine Barnes, Politics of compromise: The Tajikistani peace process, Conciliation Resources, April 2001, https://www.c-r.org/accord/tajikistan/tajik-civil-war-causes-and-dynamics; Francisco Olmos, State-building myths in Central Asia, FPC, October 2019, https://fpc.org.uk/state-building-myths-in-central-asia/[2] Kamoludin Abdullaev and Catherine Barnes, Politics of compromise: The Tajikistani peace process, Conciliation Resources, April 2001, https://www.c-r.org/accord/tajikistan/tajik-civil-war-causes-and-dynamics[3] Ibid.[4] Steven Erlanger, After Week of Turmoil, Tajik President Is Forced Out, The New York Times, September 1992, https://www.nytimes.com/1992/09/08/world/after-week-of-turmoil-tajik-president-is-forced-out.html[5] John Heathershaw and Parviz Mullojonov, Elite Bargains and Political Deals Project: Tajikistan Case Study, Stabilisation Unit, UK Government, February 2018, https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/766056/Tajikistan_case_study.pdf[6] United Nations Peacemaker, General Agreement on the Establishment of Peace and National Accord in Tajikistan, June 1997, https://peacemaker.un.org/tajikistan-general-agreement97#:~:text=Document%20Retrieval-,General%20Agreement%20on%20the%20Establishment%20of%20Peace%20and%20National%20Accord,Summary%3A&text=Agreement%20between%20the%20President%20of,National%20Reconciliation%20(23%20December%201996)[7] Kamoludin Abdullaev and Catherine Barnes, Politics of compromise: The Tajikistani peace process, Conciliation Resources, April 2001, https://www.c-r.org/accord/tajikistan/key-elements-tajikistan-peace-agreement[8] International Crisis Group, Tajikistan: An Uncertain Peace, December 2001, https://www.crisisgroup.org/europe-central-asia/central-asia/tajikistan/tajikistan-uncertain-peace[9] OSCE ODIHR, Republic of Tajikistan-Elections to the Parliament 27 February 2000, May 2000, https://www.osce.org/files/f/documents/5/e/15984.pdf[10] John Heathershaw and Parviz Mullojonov, Elite Bargains and Political Deals Project: Tajikistan Case Study, Stabilisation Unit, UK Government, February 2018, https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/766056/Tajikistan_case_study.pdf[11] Ibid.[12] Ibid; RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, Tajik Politician Sent To Remote Jail After Interview, RFE/RL, August 2015, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajik-politician-sent-remote-jail-after-rferl-interview/27196543.html; Saodat Mahbatsho, Tajikistan: Mysterious Death Raises Concerns About Militant Returns, Eurasianet, July 2009, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-mysterious-death-raises-concerns-about-militant-returns[13] Bartlomiej Kaminski and Saumya Mitra, Borderless Bazaars and Regional Integration in Central Asia, The World Bank, May 2012, http://documents1.worldbank.org/curated/en/108461468016850647/pdf/693110PUB0publ067926B09780821394717.pdf[14] Bardia Rahmani, How the War on Drugs Is Making Tajikistan More Authoritarian, The Diplomat, July 2018, https://thediplomat.com/2018/07/how-the-war-on-drugs-is-making-tajikistan-more-authoritarian/; Though by this stage remittances had replaced them as the most significant contributor to overall GDP – 52 per cent by 2013 according to the World Bank; David Trilling, Tajikistan: Migrant Remittances Now Exceed Half of GDP, Eurasianet, April 2014, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-migrant-remittances-now-exceed-half-of-gdp[15] Foreign Assistance, Tajikistan: Foreign Assistance, April 2021, https://www.foreignassistance.gov/explore/country/Tajikistan[16] OSCE, Elections in Tajikistan, https://www.osce.org/odihr/elections/tajikistan?page=1[17] Lenta.ru, The President of Tajikistan cut off the Russian ending from his last name, March 2007, https://lenta.ru/news/2007/03/21/name[18] RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, Tajik Lawmakers Approve Bill Banning Russified Surnames, RFE/RL, April 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajik-lawmakers-approve-bill-banning-russified-surnames/30583762.html[19] Khiradmand Sheraliev, A Critical Lesson for Tajikistan: The State of Migrant Workers in 2020, The Diplomat, January 2021, https://thediplomat.com/2021/01/a-critical-lesson-for-tajikistan-the-plight-of-migrant-workers-in-2020/; Eurasianet, What’s Behind Tajikistan’s Web Woes, September 2015, https://eurasianet.org/whats-behind-tajikistans-web-woes[20] RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, SMS Services Down In Tajikistan After Protest Calls, RFE/RL, October 2014, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajikistan-sms-internet-group-24-quvatov-phone-message-blockage-dushanbe/26630390.html[21] RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, Three Arrested As Tajik Opposition Tycoon Buried In Istanbul, RFE/RL, March 2015, https://www.rferl.org/a/slain-tajik-opposition-tycoon-to-be-buried-in-istanbul/26889471.html[22] RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, Tajik Activists Jailed For Ties To Banned Opposition Group, RFE/RL, April 2015, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajikisatn-jails-two-activists-group-24-quvatov/26946831.html[23] Farangis Najibullah, Tajikistan’s Islamic Renaissance Party On Life Support, RFE/RL, March 2015, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajikistan-islamic-renaissance-party-on-the-ropes/26880001.html; David Trilling, Tajikistan Drives Top Opposition Leader Into Exile, Eurasianet, June 2015, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-drives-top-opposition-leader-into-exile[24] The electricity supply to the Sheraton hotel mysteriously was cut just before the Congress was due to take place leading it to be abandoned; Columbia University, Global Freedom of Expression, The Case of the Islamic Renaissance Party of Tajikistan, https://globalfreedomofexpression.columbia.edu/cases/case-islamic-renaissance-party-tajikistan/; Akbar Borisov, Tajikistan’s Islamic opposition party faces ban amid crackdown, Yahoo News, August 2015, https://news.yahoo.com/tajikistans-islamic-opposition-party-faces-ban-amid-crackdown-183932617.html?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbi53aWtpcGVkaWEub3JnLw&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAMMaYF4kth41fEZu5EyiP57kLAnm0WWSURoBe0X2MKE0V0e9zXRmGrUrwk_vpYYYErFF8A6K5TfjltMlQ359PJddE1qhSkD6U54Bg1E9YHfNjzU8HlPwYYwsfXk564iMdueORTKHoMkeyyVLm-FAmJ2Iv9fTcaeS7HtDsm_DE30A[25] RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, More Detained in Tajikistan As Manhunt Continues For Ousted Defense Official, RFE/RL, September 2015, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajikistan-renegade-nazarzoda-hunt/27230296.html[26] RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, Tajikistan Confirms Death of Mutinous Former Deputy Defense Minister, RFE/RL, September 2015, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajikistan-renegade-general-killed/27251919.html; Eurasianet at the time noted a number of inconsistencies in the official accounts of what was going on – Eurasianet, Tajikistan: Digging for Answers About Armed Clashes, September 2015, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-digging-for-answers-about-armed-clashes[27] HRW, Tajikistan: Opposition Activists Detained, September 2015, https://www.hrw.org/news/2015/09/18/tajikistan-opposition-activists-detained[28] Freedom now, Mahmadali Hayit, https://www.freedom-now.org/cases/mahmadali-hayit/; Eurasianet, Tajikistan: Rights groups demand release of tortured political prisoner, March 2019, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-rights-groups-demand-release-of-tortured-political-prisoner[29] Columbia University, Global Freedom of Expression, The Case of the Islamic Renaissance Party of Tajikistan, https://globalfreedomofexpression.columbia.edu/cases/case-islamic-renaissance-party-tajikistan/[30] Eurasianet, Tajikistan: State Media Forced to Always Call President By Unwieldy Title, April 2017, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-state-media-forced-always-call-president-unwieldy-title[31] https://lawyersforlawyers.org/en/lawyers/buzurgmehr-yorov/ See also the EU’s call for his release following the determination of the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention https://eeas.europa.eu/regions/europe-and-central-asia/88547/12th-eu-tajikistan-human-rights-dialogue_en[32] Farangis Najibullah, Tajikistan’s Banned Islamic Party Claims Former Members Hit By ‘Wave Of Arrests’, RFE/RL, June 2018, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajikistan-s-banned-islamic-irpt-party--members-hit-by-wave-arrests/29283941.html[33] Singeli Agnew (Producer/Director), The Weekly: When ISIS Killed Cyclists on Their Journey Around the World, The New York Times, June 2019, https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/21/the-weekly/isis-bike-attack-tajikistan.html[34] Eurasianet, Tajikistan’s exiled opposition adrift as strongman rule hardens at home, January 2020, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistans-exiled-opposition-adrift-as-strongman-rule-hardens-at-home; Malgosia Krakowska, Tajik opposition movement, moderndiplomacy, August 2020, https://moderndiplomacy.eu/2020/08/03/tajik-opposition-movement/[35] Exeter University Central Asian Studies Network, Central Asian Political Exiles (CAPE) database, https://excas.net/projects/political-exiles/[36] Adam Hug (ed.), Closing the Door: the challenge facing activists from the former Soviet Union seeking asylum or refuge, FPC, December 2017, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/closing-the-door/; Adam Hug (ed.), No shelter: the harassment of activists abroad by intelligence services from the former Soviet Union, FPC, November 2016, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/noshelter/; Adam Hug (ed.), Shelter from the storm? The asylum, refuge and extradition situation facing activists from the former Soviet Union, FPC April 2014, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/shelter-from-the-storm/[37] EDAL, Communicated cases against Russia and Poland, January 2019, https://www.asylumlawdatabase.eu/en/content/communicated-cases-against-russia-and-poland[38] RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, Tajik Activist Gadoev Says He Was Abducted, Tortured, Given Ultimatum, RFE/RL, March 2019, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajik-activist-gadoev-says-he-was-abducted-tortured-taken-to-dushanbe/29807051.html[39] IPHR, Tajikistan and the COVID pandemic: denial, cover-up and downplay, September 2020, https://www.iphronline.org/tajikistan-and-the-covid-pandemic-denial-cover-up-and-downplay.html[40] Eurasianet, Tajikistan: Feast in the time of coronavirus, March 2020, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-feast-in-the-time-of-coronavirus[41] IPHR, Tajikistan and the COVID pandemic: denial, cover-up and downplay, September 2020, https://www.iphronline.org/tajikistan-and-the-covid-pandemic-denial-cover-up-and-downplay.html[42] IPHR, Tajikistan: Cover-up and downplay of Covid-19; massive restrictions on expression, October 2020, https://www.iphronline.org/tajikistan-cover-up-and-downplay-of-covid-19-massive-restrictions-on-expression.html[43] Johns Hopkins University, Covid-19 Dashboard, https://www.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6[44] Catherine Putz, If Only It Were That Easy: Tajikistan Declares Itself COVID-19 Free, The Diplomat, January 2021, https://thediplomat.com/2021/01/if-only-it-were-that-easy-tajikistan-declares-itself-covid-19-free/[45] IPHR, Tajikistan and the COVID pandemic: denial, cover-up and downplay, September 2020, https://www.iphronline.org/tajikistan-and-the-covid-pandemic-denial-cover-up-and-downplay.html[46] Iskandar Firuz and Barot Yusufi, Agency of Statistics: in Tajikistan, mortality increased by 11%, but this is not related to COVID-19, Radio Ozodi, July 2020, https://rus.ozodi.org/a/30757379.html[47] RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, In Tajikistan, COVID-19 Patients, Families Scoff At Pledge Of ‘Free Treatment’, RFE/RL, February 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajikistan-covid-19-coronavirus-free-treatment-scam-big-bills/31112946.html[48] Khiradmand Sheraliev, A Critical Lesson for Tajikistan: The State of Migrant Workers in 2020, The Diplomat, January 2021, https://thediplomat.com/2021/01/a-critical-lesson-for-tajikistan-the-plight-of-migrant-workers-in-2020/[49] Farangis Najibullah, Russia Finally Opens Its Borders To Tajik Migrants, But Exorbitant Airfares Keeping Laborers Out, RFE/RL, April 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/russia-tajikistan-migrants-remittances-borders-pandemic/31193152.html[50] Farangis Najibullah, Many Tajiks Forced To Skip Meals As Poverty Deepens, Survey Shows, RFE/RL, January 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajikstan-covid-poverty-economy-survey/31031706.html[51] World Data Atlas, Tajikistan - Gross domestic product per capita in current prices, https://knoema.com/atlas/Tajikistan/GDP-per-capita[52] In March 2021 Rahmon disappeared from view for several weeks BNE - Intellinews, Mystery as Tajik president Rahmon disappears from public view, March 2021, https://www.intellinews.com/mystery-as-tajik-president-rahmon-disappears-from-public-view-205910/; Radio Ozodi, The delay in Rahmon's visit to Bactria sparked reports of "his health condition", March 2021, https://www.ozodi.org/a/31163696.html[53] Tamiris Esfandiar, Tajikistan: President’s Family Expands Grip with Key Positions, Eurasianet, May 2014, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-presidents-family-expands-grip-with-key-positions[54] Catherine Putz, Hired: Tajik President’s Daughter Lands Deputy Post at a Major Bank, July 2017, https://thediplomat.com/2017/07/hired-tajik-presidents-daughter-lands-deputy-post-at-a-major-bank/[55] Eurasianet, Tajikistan's ruling family extends control over telecoms, April 2018, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistans-ruling-family-extends-control-over-telecoms[56] Alexander Cooley and John Heathershaw, Dictators Without Borders Power and Money in Central Asia, Yale University Press, 2017. A summary of the book can be found here: https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/dictators-without-borders/[57] Ibid[58] David Trilling, Russian Aluminum Giant Pries Open Books at Tajikistan’s Largest Factory, June 2014, https://eurasianet.org/russian-aluminum-giant-pries-open-books-at-tajikistans-largest-factory[59] Eurasianet, Report: Tajikistan to yield share in aluminium plant to China, December 2019, https://eurasianet.org/report-tajikistan-to-yield-share-in-aluminum-plant-to-china; Niva Yau, China business briefing: Whose Belt and Road is it anyway?, Eurasianet, September 2020,  https://eurasianet.org/china-business-briefing-whose-belt-and-road-is-it-anyway[60] RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, A Tajik Business Empire Tied To The President Keeps on Running, Despite Being Shut Down, RFE/RL, December 2019, https://www.rferl.org/a/family-ties-tajik-style-presidential-son-in-law-s-business-empire-still-active-despite-shut-down-claim/30342381.html; RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, Firm Linked To Tajik President’s Son-In-Law Awarded $13 Million Government Contract, RFE/RL, October 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/firm-linked-to-tajik-president-s-son-in-law-awarded-13-million-government-contract/30909107.html[61] Vlad Lavrov, Ilya Lozovsky and Bermet Talant, A Murder in Istanbul, OCCRP, June 2018, https://www.occrp.org/en/moneybymarriage/a-murder-in-istanbul[62] Radio Ozodi, Investigation by Radio Ozodi: Most Faroz Companies Continue To Work, December 2019, https://rus.ozodi.org/a/radio-ozodi-investigation/30328126.html[63] Paolo Sorbello, Tajikistan’s Presidential Family Ousts Competitor in the Fuel Market, The Diplomat, November 2017, https://thediplomat.com/2017/11/tajikistans-presidential-family-ousts-competitor-in-the-fuel-market/[64] Elena Korotkova, Emomali Rahmona obvinjajut v nazhive na epidemii koronavirusa v Tadzhikistane, News Asia, June 2020, http://www.news-asia.ru/view/13889; Eurasianet, Tajikistan: Coronavirus panic puts sufferers of other illnesses in grave danger, May 2020, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-coronavirus-panic-puts-sufferers-of-other-illnesses-in-grave-danger[65] Eurasianet, Tajikistan: As Russia cracks open gate, rush for air tickets ensues, April 2021, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-as-russia-cracks-open-gate-rush-for-air-tickets-ensues?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter[66] RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, Tajik Official’s Son Questioned Over Deadly Accident, RFE/RL, October 2013, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajikistan-road-death-rahmon-relative/25144985.html; RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, Tajik President Sacks Railways Chief Amid Crash Controversy, RFE/RL, February 2014, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajikistan-railways-official-son-tragedy/25252762.html; Pavla Holcova, Vlad Lavrov and OCCRP Tajikistan, Ex-Tajik Railways Chief’s Czech Bonanza, OCCRP, January 2018, https://www.occrp.org/en/corruptistan/tajikistan/ex-tajik-railways-chiefs-czech-bonanza; Different reports have suggested that another of his sons may be married to one of Rahmon’s daughters but there is a lack of clarity on the veracity of these claims.[67] Eurasianet, Tajikistan: More presidential family members sell off assets, September 2019, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-more-presidential-family-members-sell-off-assets[68] U.S. Department of State, 2020 Investment Climate Statements: Tajikistan, https://www.state.gov/reports/2020-investment-climate-statements/tajikistan/; The Bertlsemann Transformation Index 2020 report notes ‘rampant corruption and extortion by tax and regulatory agencies’ -  https://www.bti-project.org/content/en/downloads/reports/country_report_2020_TJK.pdf[69] OCCRP, Officials Examine Sprawling Shadow Economy Tajikistan, August 2019, https://www.occrp.org/en/daily/10384-officials-examine-sprawling-shadow-economy-in-tajikistan[70] Transparency International, Corruption Perceptions Index 2020, https://www.transparency.org/en/cpi/2020/index/tjk; BTI Transformation Index, Tajikistan, https://www.bti-project.org/en/reports/country-dashboard-TJK.html[71] Freedom House, Countries and Territories, https://freedomhouse.org/countries/freedom-world/scores?sort=desc&order=Total%20Score%20and%20Status[72] CCER of the Republic of Tajikistan, Decision of the Central Commission for Elections and Referenda, October 2020, http://kmir.tj/2020/10/14/qarori-komissiyai-markazii-intihobot-va-rajpursi-25/[73] OSCE ODIHR, Republic of Tajikistan, Presidential Election 11 October 2020, ODIHR Election Assessment Mission Final Report, January 2021, https://www.osce.org/files/f/documents/c/6/477019.pdf; ONS, Electoral statistics, UK: March 2020, January 2021, https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/elections/electoralregistration/bulletins/electoralstatisticsforuk/march2020#:~:text=The%20total%20number%20of%20UK%20Parliamentary%20electoral%20registrations%20in%20March,increased%20by%20484%2C000%20(1.0%25)[74] RFE/RL, Tajik Lawyer Questioned By Security Agents After Announcing Bid For President, September 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajik-lawyer-arrested-after-announcing-he-would-run-for-president/30821651.html; His announcement video can be seen here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uleKlGfcRFY[75] Akhbor.com, Rakhmatillo Zoyirov Reported That It Was Attacked, September 2020,https://akhbor-rus.com/-p5613-118.htm[76] Eurasianet, Tajikistan: With elections come repressions, August 2020, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-with-elections-come-repressions?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter[77] Reuters in Dushanbe, Dozens killed in riots at Tajikistan prison holding Isis militants, The Guardian, May 2019, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/may/20/tajikistan-prison-riot-guards-inmates-killed-isis-militants[78] Edward Lemon, Twitter Post, Twitter, March 2021, https://twitter.com/edwardlemon3/status/1375829741761085445?s=11[79] Bruce Pannier, Respected Tajik Activist Who Helped Migrants In Russia Is Missing After Being Forcibly Deported, RFE/RL, March 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/russia-tajikistan-migrant-laborers-activist-charges/31178041.html; Eurasianet, Tajikistan: Migrants advocate deported from Russia, March 2021, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-migrants-advocate-deported-from-russia[80] Nigora Fazliddin, Twitter Post, Twitter, March 2021, https://twitter.com/NigoraFazliddin/status/1376372442973810690?s=20[81] RFE/RL, Six Tajiks Get Lengthy Prison Terms On Terror Charges In Russia, February 2018, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajik-terror-charges-prison-russia-islamic-state/29057298.html; Frud Bezhan, Tajikistan’s Deadly Export, RFE/RL, March 2017, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajikistan-deadly-export-islamic-state-suicide-bombers/28365044.html[82] Adam Hug (ed.), Closing the Door: the challenge facing activists from the former Soviet Union seeking asylum or refuge, FPC, December 2017, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/closing-the-door/; Adam Hug (ed.) No shelter: the harassment of activists abroad by intelligence services from the former Soviet Union, FPC, November 2016, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/noshelter/; Adam Hug (ed.) Shelter from the storm? The asylum, refuge and extradition situation facing activists from the former Soviet Union, FPC, April 2014, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/shelter-from-the-storm/[83] RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, Tajik Prosecutor – General Rejects Austria’s Move To Invalidate Extradition Of Tajik Activist, RFE/RL, July 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajik-prosecutor-general-rejects-austria-s-move-to-invalidate-extradition-of-tajik-activist/30725651.html[84] Bruce Pannier, Tajik Officials Use Family Members To Pressure Critics To Return, RFE/RL, June 2019, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajik-officials-use-family-members-to-pressure-critics-to-return/30022245.html[85] Norwegian Helsinki Committee, Tajikistan: Dissident’s family interrogated, threateded, December 2020, https://www.nhc.no/en/tajikistan-dissidents-family-interrogated-threatened/[86] Steve Swerdlow, Twitter Post, Twitter, January 2021, https://twitter.com/steveswerdlow/status/1352886133760299008[87] U.S. Department of State, 2019 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices: Tajikistan, https://www.state.gov/reports/2019-country-reports-on-human-rights-practices/tajikistan/[88] United Nations Human Rights Treaty Bodies, UN Tready Body Database, https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/treatybodyexternal/Download.aspx?symbolno=CAT%2FC%2FTJK%2FCO%2F3&Lang=en[89] NGO Explorer, Found 51 UK NGOs working in Tajikistan, https://ngoexplorer.org/country/tjk[90] Open Society Foundations, The Open Society Foundations in Tajikistan, March 2021, https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/newsroom/open-society-foundations-tajikistan[91] Civil Society Development Association, Tajik NGOs would like to propose amendments to the law of the Republic of Tajikistan “On Public Associations”, January 2019, https://en.cso-central.asia/tajik-ngos-would-like-to-propose-amendments-to-the-law-of-the-republic-of-tajikistan-on-public-associations/; Unofficial Translation (2020), Law of the Republic of Tajikistan About Public Associations, https://www.legislationline.org/download/id/8634/file/Tajikistan_law_public_associations_2007_am2019_en.pdf[92] FIDH, Their Last Stand? How Human Rights Defenders Are Being Squeezed Out in, Tajikistan, Mission Report, July 2019, https://www.fidh.org/IMG/pdf/report_tajikistan_eng_web.pdf[93] Taj Nature, The Committee for Environmental protection under the Government of the Republic of Tajikistan, April 2021, http://tajnature.tj/?p=19211&lang=en; Cabar Asia, Tajikistan: Rural Residents Complain About Poor Conditions of the Healthcare Centers (Photoreport), October 2020,https://cabar.asia/en/tajikistan-rural-residents-complain-about-poor-conditions-of-the-healthcare-centers-photoreport[94] RSF, Praising the “Leader of the Nation”, https://rsf.org/en/tajikistan[95] ASIA-Plus, About Us, https://asiaplustj.info/en/info/about[96] OSCE ODIHR, Republic of Tajikistan, Presidential Election, 11 October 2020, ODIHR Election Assessment Mission, Final Report, January 2021, https://www.osce.org/files/f/documents/c/6/477019.pdf[97] RSF in English, Twitter Post, Twitter, December 2020, https://twitter.com/RSF_en/status/1333771642103803905?s=20[98] Catherine Putz, Tajik Journalist Facing Extremism Charges, The Diplomat, February 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/02/tajik-journalist-facing-extremism-charges/[99] Akhbor.com, Statement: “Akhbor” website stops its activity, November 2020, https://akhbor.com/-p13782-117.htm; OSCE ODIHR, Republic of Tajikistan, Presidential Election, 11 October 2020, ODIHR Election Assessment Mission, Final Report, January 2021, https://www.osce.org/files/f/documents/c/6/477019.pdf[100] Eurasiant, Tajikistan: Court says news website serves as platform for terrorists, April 2020, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-court-says-news-website-serves-as-platform-for-terrorists[101] CPJ, Tajikistan authorities question family members of exiled journalist, July 2020, https://cpj.org/2020/07/tajikistan-authorities-question-family-members-of-exiled-journalist/[102] Ardasher Khashimov and Colleen Wood, In conservative Tajikistan, Gen Z activists are using Instagram to right for feminism, The Calvert Journal, September 2020, https://www.calvertjournal.com/articles/show/12165/feminism-tajikistan-instagram-internet-activism-post-war-civil-liberties; Katherine Long, Dushanbe’s millennials are reconnecting a broken city – with the Internet, Ozy, September 2018, https://www.ozy.com/around-the-world/dushanbes-millennials-are-reconnecting-a-broken-city-with-the-internet/89082/[103] Ozodivideo, YouTube, https://www.youtube.com/user/Ozodivideo; Radio Ozodi, Instagram, https://www.instagram.com/radioiozodi/?hl=en; Radio Ozodi, Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/radio.ozodi/[104] Peter Leonard, US-funded broadcaster under scrutiny for enabling Tajikistan’s strongman rule, Eurasianet, March 2019, https://eurasianet.org/us-funded-broadcaster-under-scrutiny-for-enabling-tajikistans-strongman-rule[105] openDemocracy, Open letter: What is going on at RFE/RL’s Tajik service?, March 2019, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/rferl-ozodi-tajik-service-media/[106] United States Mission to the OSCE, Concern about Accreditation for RFE/RL Radio Ozodi, November 2019, https://www.osce.org/files/f/documents/3/7/438218.pdf; RFE/RL Press Release, Tajikistan Again Fails To Fully Accredit RFE/RL Journalists, January 2020, https://pressroom.rferl.org/a/tajikistan-again-fails-to-fully-accredit-rferl-journalists/30391852.html; US Agency for Global Media, Journalists in Tajikistan denied accreditation. Again, August 2020, https://www.usagm.gov/2020/08/26/journalists-in-tajikistan-denied-accreditation-again/[107] Bruce Pannier, How Tajikistan Blocked Term Extensions For Key OSCE Officials, RFE/RL, July 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/how-tajikistan-blocked-term-extensions-for-key-osce-officials/30738021.html[108] ARTICLE 19, Submission to the Universal Periodic Review of Tajikistan by ARTICLR 19, 39th Session of the Working Group, March 2021, https://www.article19.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/ARTICLE-19_Tajikistan-UPR_25.03.2021.pdf[109] Eurasianet, Tajikistan sentences journalist to 12 years in jail, July 2018,https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-sentences-journalist-to-12-years-in-jail[110] RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, Tajik Authorities Issue Arrest Warrant In Absentia For Prominent Journalist, RFE/RL, February 2019, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajik-authorities-issue-arrest-warrant-in-absentia-for-prominent-journalist/29765348.html[111] Catherine Putz, Tajik Journalist Facing Extremism Charges, The Diplomat, February 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/02/tajik-journalist-facing-extremism-charges/[112] Freedom Now, Tajik Journalist Daler SharipovReleased from Detention, https://mailchi.mp/freedom-now/freedom-now-3599010?e=2ae12a39e1[113] International Bar Association Human Rights Institute, Independent High Level Panel of Legal Experts onMedia Freedom, 2020, https://www.ibanet.org/Document/Default.aspx?DocumentUid=E1971BEB-58A0-4AD7-BC37-203DC9B604AD; See also CPJ, Tajik authorities harass journalist Humayra Bakhtiyar and family, July 2019, https://cpj.org/2019/07/tajik-authorities-harass-journalist-humayra-bakhti/[114] Radio Ozodi, "Troll Factory" of Tajikistan: key figures and performers. Radio Ozodi investigation, May 2019, https://rus.ozodi.org/a/29926413.html[115] Eurasianet, Tajikistan: COVID-19 outbreak offers cover for fresh assault on free press, June 2020, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-covid-19-outbreak-offers-cover-for-fresh-assault-on-free-press; Eurasianet, September 2020, Interview with Tajikistan’s would-be youthful change candidate https://eurasianet.org/interview-with-tajikistans-would-be-youthful-change-candidate[116] ICJ, Neither Check nor Balance: the Judiciary in Tajikistan, December 2020,  https://www.icj.org/new-icj-report-calls-for-a-comprehensive-reform-of-the-judiciary-in-tajikistan/[117] OSAC, Tajikistan 2020 Crime & Safety Report, March 2020, https://www.osac.gov/Country/Tajikistan/Content/Detail/Report/59bbeb63-ead5-4c9c-9b4f-181c2f803f23[118] Human Rights Watch, Tajikistan: Free Human Rights Lawyers, May 2016, https://www.hrw.org/news/2016/05/04/tajikistan-free-human-rights-lawyers[119] IFEX, Human rights lawyer Shukhrat Kudratov, June 2019, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajikistan-qishloq-ovozi-tabarov-death-saidov/27799302.html[120] Unites States Commission on International Religious Freedom, Tajikistan, https://www.uscirf.gov/countries/tajikistan[121] RFE/RL, Tajikistan Announces Reforms To Islamic Council, September 2010, https://www.rferl.org/a/Tajikistan_Announces_Reforms_To_Islamic_Council/2156971.html; Saodat Olimova, Political Islam And Conflict In Tajikistan, CA&C Press AB https://www.ca-c.org/dataeng/11.olimova.shtml[122] Joshua Kucera, The Aga Khan’s tightrope walk in Tajikistan, Al Jazeera, August 2013, https://www.aljazeera.com/opinions/2013/8/31/the-aga-khans-tightrope-walk-in-tajikistan[123] RFE/RL, Tajik President Signs Law Banning Children From Mosques, August 2011, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajik_president_signs_law_banning_children_from_mosques/24285911.html[124] Paul Goble, Tajikistan, Most Muslim Country in Central Asia, Struggles to Rein In Islam, Jamestown Foundation, February 2018, https://jamestown.org/program/tajikistan-muslim-country-central-asia-struggles-rein-islam/; Forum 18, Tajikistan: Last madrassahs finally closed, 6 September 2016, https://www.refworld.org/docid/57cee73f4.html[125] Mushfig Bayram, Forum 18, Tajikistan: Hijab-wearing and beards ban continues, Forum 18, October 2018, https://www.forum18.org/archive.php?article_id=2421[126] Mirzonabi Holikzod, From 5 to 23 years old: Trial against alleged followers of the Muslim Brotherhood ends in Tajikistan, Radio Ozodi, April 2021, https://rus.ozodi.org/a/31199680.html[127] Mushfig Bayram, Forum 18, and John Kinahan, Forum 8, Tajikistan: Religious freedom survey, December 2020, https://www.forum18.org/archive.php?article_id=2625[128] Ibid.[129] Saodat Olimova, Political Islam And Conflict In Tajikistan, CA&C Press AB, https://www.ca-c.org/dataeng/11.olimova.shtml[130] RFE/RL, Women’s Day Becomes Mother’s Day In Tajikistan, March 2009, https://www.rferl.org/a/Womens_Day_Becomes_Mothers_Day_In_Tajikistan/1506575.html;  Government Of The Republic Of Tajikistan, President Of The Republic Of Tajikistan, http://www.president.tj/taxonomy/term/5/83[131] Parliament of Tajikistan, Deputies of the Majlisi Namoyandagon of the Majlisi Oli of the Republic of Tajikistan, https://www.parlament.tj/en/deputats[132] Government Of The Republic Of Tajikistan, President Of The Republic Of Tajikistan, http://www.prezident.tj/taxonomy/term/5/135[133] Nilufar Karimova, Teenage Marriage Persists in Tajikistan, IWPR, May 2014, https://iwpr.net/global-voices/teenage-marriage-persists-tajikistan; Sarvinoz Ruhullo, "He threatened to kill me!" In Tajikistan, a 46-year-old man married a 12-year-old girl, Radio Ozodi, August 2020, https://rus.ozodi.org/a/30783109.html ; Ardasher Khashimov and Colleen Wood,  In conservative Tajikistan, Gen Z activists are using Instagram to fight for feminism, Calvert Journal, September 2020, https://www.calvertjournal.com/articles/show/12165/feminism-tajikistan-instagram-internet-activism-post-war-civil-liberties[134] Tajikistan: 2017 Demographic and Health Survey, https://dhsprogram.com/pubs/pdf/SR250/SR250.pdf[135] Nozilakhon Mukhamedova and Kai Wegerich,  The feminization of agriculture in post-Soviet Tajikistan, Journal of Rural Studies, January 2018, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0743016717301766[136] HRW, “Violence with Every Step”, Weak State Response to Domestic Violence in Tajikistan, September 2019, https://www.hrw.org/report/2019/09/19/violence-every-step/weak-state-response-domestic-violence-tajikistan[137] Cabar Asia, Tajikistan: When Justice Assaults a Woman, https://cabar.asia/en/tajikistan-when-justice-assaults-a-woman[138] Fergana News, Dushanbe resident fined for indecent proposal to married woman, July 2020, https://fergana.site/news/120594/; Sher Khasimov and Steve Swerdlow, Is This Tajikistan’s #MeToo Moment?, The Diplomat, November 2020,https://thediplomat.com/2020/11/is-this-tajikistans-metoo-moment/[139] Zebo Nazarova, Tajikistan’s LGBT Community: Struggling For Recognition ‘As People’, Current Time, June 2020, https://en.currenttime.tv/a/30684238.html[140] IPHR, LGBT people in Tajikistan: beaten, raped and exploited by police, July 2017, https://www.iphronline.org/lgbt-people-tajikistan-beaten-raped-exploited-police.html[141] RFE/RL’s Tajik Service, Tajikistan Creates Registry Of ‘Proven’ LGBT People, Official Journal Says, RFE/RL, October 2017, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajikistan-lgbt-registry/28800614.html[142] Ardasher Khashimov and Tahmina Inoyatova, Young People, Social Media, and Urban Transformation of Dushanbe, The Oxus Society for Central Asian Affairs, May 2021, https://oxussociety.org/young-people-social-media-and-urban-transformation-of-dushanbe/[143] Xeniya Mironova, Destructing Soviet Architecture in Central Asia, Voices on Central Asia, December 2019, https://voicesoncentralasia.org/destructing-soviet-architecture-in-central-asia/#:~:text=The%20myriad%20of%20other%20Soviet,arches%20(Leningradskie%20doma%20or%20Doma[144] Esfandiar Adineh, Demolishing Dushanbe: how the former city of Stalinabad is erasing its Soviet past, The Guardian, October 2017, https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/oct/19/demolishing-dushanbe-former-stalinabad-erasing-soviet-past[145] Radio Ozodi, List of 15 historic buildings in Dushanbe not subject to demolition, April 2016, https://rus.ozodi.org/a/27703145.html[146] Valentina Kasymbekova, How does a residence permit violate the rights of citizens, and why is it still not removed?, ASIA-Plus, November 2019, https://asiaplustj.info/ru/news/tajikistan/society/20191109/kak-propiska-narushaet-prava-grazhdan-i-pochemu-eyo-do-sih-por-ne-uberut[147] Vestnik Kavkaza, Aggravation of situation on Kyrgyzstan-Tajikistan border reported, April 2021, https://vestnikkavkaza.net/news/Aggravation-of-situation-on-Kyrgyzstan-Tajikistan-border-reported.html[148] https://thediplomat.com/2021/03/kyrgyzstan-uzbekistan-border-resolved-100-percent/[149] Christian Hale, Twitter Post, Twitter, May 2021 https://twitter.com/christianhale84/status/1388546278439673857?s=11[150] RFE/RL, No Plans To Swap Volatile Vorukh Exclave For Kyrgyz Land, Tajik President Tells Residents, April 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/tajikistan-rahmon-vorukh-border-disputes-kyrgyzstan-/31195194.html[151] The World Bank, The World Bank in Tajikistan, https://www.worldbank.org/en/country/tajikistan/overview; Asel Murzakulova, Research Fellow, Mountain Societies Research Institute, UCA  and Irene Mestre, Natural Resource Management Dynamics in Border Communities of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, University of Central Asia, April 2016, https://www.ucentralasia.org/Research/Item/1148/EN[152] RFE/RL, In First Official Count, Tajikistan Says 19 Killed In Kyrgyz Border Clashes, May 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-tajikistan-border-fighting-perceptions/31237942.html[153] Ibid.[154]OSCE, Calls between OSCR Chairperson-in-Office Linde and Foreign Ministers of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, May 2021, https://www.osce.org/chairmanship/485162; Isabelle Khurshudyan, At Russia’s Victory Day parade, a show of military might amid tensions with the West, The Washington post, May 2021, https://www.washingtonpost.com/photography/interactive/2021/russia-parade-victory-day-putin/[155] Dual Citizenship Report, Kyrgyzstan, https://www.dualcitizenshipreport.org/dual-citizenship/kyrgyzstan/#:~:text=Dual%20Citizenship%20Kyrgyzstan,-Restricted&text=Pursuant%20to%20the%20Constitution%2C%20the,Kyrgyz%20Republic%20is%20a%20party[156] Bradley Jardine and Edward Lemon, Pespectives: Tajikistan’s security ties with China a Faustian bargain, Eurasianet, March 2020, https://eurasianet.org/perspectives-tajikistans-security-ties-with-china-a-faustian-bargain[157] Adam Hug (ed.) Sharing worst practice: How countries and institutions in the former Soviet Union help create legal tools of repression, FPC, May 2016, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/sharingworstpractice/; Bradley Jardine, China’s Surveillance State Has Eyes on Central Asia, Foreign Policy, November 2019, https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/11/15/huawei-xinjiang-kazakhstan-uzbekistan-china-surveillance-state-eyes-central-asia/[158] Umida Hasimova, Will Tajikistan Ever Join the Eurasian Economic Union? The Dioplomat, August 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/08/will-tajikistan-ever-join-the-eurasian-economic-union/; Eurasianet, Russia using crisis in Tajikistan to advance EAEU agenda?, February 2021, https://eurasianet.org/russia-using-crisis-in-tajikistan-to-advance-eaeu-agenda[159] Though the UK’s overseas territories have been known to provide a helpful umbrella for some locally owned firms.[160] World Bank, Net official development assistance and official aid received (constant 2018 US$) – Tajikistan, https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/DT.ODA.ALLD.KD?locations=TJ[161] European Commission, Tajikistan, https://ec.europa.eu/international-partnerships/where-we-work/tajikistan_en[162] Eurasianet, Tajikistan: Coronavirus brinfs bonanza of aid, but zero accountability, July 2020, https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-coronavirus-brings-bonanza-of-aid-but-zero-accountability[163] European Commission, New EU-Tajikistan partnership & cooperation agreement – authorisation to open negotiations, https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/better-regulation/have-your-say/initiatives/12389-Authorisation-to-open-negotiations-and-negotiate-an-Enhanced-Partnership-and-Cooperation-Agreement-with-Tajikistan; EU Delegation to Tajikistan, Tajikistan and the EU, October 2020, https://eeas.europa.eu/delegations/tajikistan/750/tajikistan-and-eu_en[164] US Department of State, U.S. Relations With Tajikistan, January 2021, https://www.state.gov/u-s-relations-with-tajikistan/#:~:text=The%20United%20States%20and%20Tajikistan,consultation%20process%20to%20enhance%20cooperation[165] Bermet Talant, Twitter Post, Twitter, May 2021, https://twitter.com/ser_ou_parecer/status/1391152101850591240?s=11[166] Development Portal.org, Tajikistan, https://d-portal.org/ctrack.html?country=TJ#view=main[167] Eurasianet, Tajikistan: Coronavirus brings bonanza of aid, but zero accountability, July 2020,  https://eurasianet.org/tajikistan-coronavirus-brings-bonanza-of-aid-but-zero-accountability [post_title] => Retreating Rights – Tajikistan: Introduction [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => retreating-rights-tajikistan-introduction [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-16 21:17:05 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-05-16 20:17:05 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://fpc.org.uk/?p=5806 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )[8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5763 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2021-05-17 00:00:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-05-16 23:00:23 [post_content] => Tajikistan’s dissent into full authoritarianism has taken place gradually, but inexorably since the end of the Civil War as the President has consolidated power into his own hands and those of his family and close associates. The limited freedoms and political competition of the immediate post-war era have given way, particularly since 2014, to a brutality that seeks to repress dissent, irrespective of how minor or impotent, with overwhelming force that can destroy wider families and communities. Tajikistan now finds itself close to the bottom of the global freedom rankings for political competition, civic space, media and religious freedom as the regime has effectively deployed its multi-track approach of ‘suppress, acquiesce and incorporate’ to neutralise alternative voices. It is also the least economically developed country in Central Asia and on some measures the 22nd poorest country in the world.[1] So there are real challenges about deciding whether, when and how to engage with the country (and therefore the regime), which come with difficult trade-offs for those involved, where development and human rights imperatives do not always align in the short-term. This publication does not have a magic answer to resolve these tensions, particularly as the scope for international leverage is more limited than even in some of Tajikistan’s neighbours. It lacks Uzbekistan’s and Kazakhstan’s desire for international recognition or their opportunities for investment, and the civic space that is narrowing but still remains in Kyrgyzstan has almost completely closed in Tajikistan. This does not mean however that there is nothing that can be done to help respond to the retreating rights situation in Tajikistan. Firstly, as the contributions from Larisa Alexandrova, Dilbar Turakhanova, Xeniya Mironova, Favziya Nazarova and Nigina Bakhrieva show there is still some difference between ‘almost completely closed’ and closed. Some areas remain where limited, incremental change can be made (even case by case) by human rights NGOs working in hugely challenging circumstances, provided they do not directly stray into addressing the fundamental issues of political power in the country. It is not unreasonable to believe that there may continue to be scope for limited progress in chipping away at Tajikistan’s endemic problems with domestic violence; or that local advocacy can help address certain issues around torture and mistreatment (in cases without a significant political dimension); and that concerted international protest, particularly when supported by Western Embassies, can sometimes push the regime to reverse itself as they did in the case of Khairullo Mirsaidov or Sharoffidin Gadoev.[2] Some authors in this collection point out areas for potential reform including: publishing and debating town masterplans; abolishing the propiska registration system; providing greater support for women in employment and seeking to be involved in public office;[3] removing compulsory medical examinations for those seeking to get married and the widespread requirement for HIV tests for employment; improving treatment for torture victims and educating the police and security services about the impact of torture; and many other pragmatic and incremental suggestions made in detail in their essays. While it still may be very much an uphill struggle to achieve even these modest objectives it is not entirely fanciful to believe it may be possible for some of them to be achieved, at least in part. However, clearly there is only so much that can be done by local groups on the ground given the general state of Tajikistan’s civic space. When it comes to international involvement on the ground careful thought must always be given as to whether the local presence is able to deliver quantifiable outcomes that directly improve the lives of local people in a way that goes over and above the compromises needed to obtain access. Tajikistan’s particular history gives it a higher legacy presence of NGOs and media outlets than the current level of repression would normally allow, given the approach of a government that has provided the option of self-censorship as an alternative to being forced out. However, international presence should not be simply maintained for its own sake, on the basis of the Micawber principle that ‘something will turn up’, if the same organisations and funding could instead be more active in providing support to the people of Tajikistan from outside the country. Where development outcomes are clearly identifiable and money is able to bypass state systems as much as possible, albeit recognising the penetration of the ruling elite across all sectors of society, a clear rational for continuing such work exists. However, there would seem to be a strong case for reviewing funding mechanisms that provide budget support under normal circumstances to the Government of Tajikistan, given that efforts at capacity building come with huge risks of corruption (either directly or by freeing up other funding that can be used for corrupt ends).[4] There are a particular set of questions here for the International Financial Institutions (IFIs), notably the World Bank, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and the Asian Development Bank that have explicit responsibilities in relation to supporting good governance, democracy and human rights. Given the extent of the regime’s penetration of the private sector it is extremely challenging to find local partners that are truly able to be independent. For example, in 2018 the chief executives of EBRD’s local partners Arvand Bank and Imon International, institutions with comparatively good local reputations, were forced to quit in moves seemingly aimed at reducing competition with family controlled alternatives.[5] Similarly, partnerships with the state and municipalities, including Rustam Emomali’s Dushanbe, create significant challenges around potential cronyism and the displacement of other funds to corrupt ends even if the projects themselves are well managed. If the IFIs are going to continue to invest in Tajikistan, something that should itself potentially be reconsidered except for projects with urgent development outcomes, there needs to be greater conditionality that relates to wider governance and human rights reforms beyond the scope of specific projects. There is scope for IFIs and major donors to improve consultation with local and international civil society about where the benefits of such projects can outweigh their drawbacks, including the risk of further legitimating the regime. There is a strong case for undertaking a further review of all IFI spending in Tajikistan, particularly schemes that involve close collaboration with or direct funding of state structures.[6] At a local level, as Shoira Olimova argues, it is important to make sure information is available in Tajik about all major donor funded projects to improve accountability and to increase the overall amount and detail of project information that is made publically available. Also there is a need for greater support for local NGO-led initiatives such as the ‘Early Warning System’ that help to improve local transparency and accountability. Similarly, international efforts to support Tajikistan’s security sector need to be considered in the context of the systemic brutality applied by the security services to critics of the regime. The West should try to use what little political capital it has to try to address the root causes of radicalisation, in particular the governance of the country, rather than merely treating the symptoms in a way which may help strengthen institutions that can themselves generate resentment and instability. However, there may be an alternative role, and opportunities, for security cooperation through OSCE border assistance in the context of the border between Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, though CSTO involvement may be preferred in Dushanbe. While Russia and China remain far and away Tajikistan’s most important international partners, Tajikistan is conscious of the need (as other Central Asian powers are) not to become totally reliant on either or both of them. Tajikistan’s desire to maintain at least a semblance of a multi-vector foreign policy does provide some limited opportunities for other players to have influence at the margins. At present negotiations to ‘enhance’ the existing EU-Tajikistan Partnership & Cooperation agreement remain stalled, despite a decision on formally opening talks being due since the second half of 2020.[7] Given the grim situation on the ground in Tajikistan it would make sense for this process to remain on pause, not least because due to the state of repression any eventual deal would likely struggle to pass a European Parliament that has been rightly more willing to flex its muscles and block the ratification of deals with more egregious human rights abusers in recent years. The EU has also had initial discussions with Tajikistan over membership of its special incentive arrangement for Sustainable Development and Good Governance (GSP+) that supports vulnerable developing countries who have ratified 27 international conventions on human rights, labour rights, environmental protection and climate change, and good governance.[8] While Tajikistan has a quite good record of signing up to international treaties its compliance with them has been woeful. Taking significant steps towards resolving that compliance failure should be a prerequisite for bringing the country into the scheme. Tajikistan would seem not to be top of the priority list in Central Asia for the UK to convert the existing EU Partnership and Cooperation Agreement into a bilateral arrangement (as it has with Uzbekistan). However, the UK should consider what benefits such a formal framework would bring and ensure that existing EU-Tajikistan human rights provisions are mirrored rather than dropped in any bilateral arrangement. As with the EU it should not seek to develop an agreement with enhanced benefits for Tajikistan without significant changes on the ground. Given Tajikistan’s position at or near the floor of most international human rights rankings there are strong arguments in favour of adding Tajikistan to the UK’s list of Human Rights Priority Countries, a list which currently contains its neighbours Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan.[9] Though the US Government is not overburdened with good options when it comes to exploring post-Afghanistan bases in Central Asia (for the purposes of them continuing to provide external security assistance to that country), Tajikistan would not seem to be the right fit. This is not only for reasons of human rights and governance but on the basis that both Russia and China already have a military presence on the ground in the country. As noted in the introduction, the previous leaders of the OSCE’s human rights mechanisms were blocked from reappointment by Tajikistani opposition to their candidacies, but the fear that this may happen again must hopefully not influence the decision-making of their successors. It is important for the OSCE, both institutionally and its member states, to actively stand up for the rights of citizens of Tajikistan to speak openly at ODIHR’s Human Dimension conference without fear for their safety or for that of their families. Similarly, with Tajikistan due for its Universal Periodic Review (UPR) on November 4th 2021, proactive measures will need to be taken to ensure activists are able to engage fully with the UN process.[10] International partners should consider using the UPR as a stepping off point to push Tajikistan hard on a more narrowly targeted set of priority issues, cherry-picking from the smorgasbord of issues usually raised by countries through the mechanism. Finding ways to tackle corruption in Tajikistan are central to assisting both with the country’s development challenges and for any hope of reforming its system of governance. While efforts at reform on the ground will be hampered by the role played by ‘the family’ across political and economic life, international action may still be able to help. Although, as noted in the introduction London is not a major focus of illicit Tajik funds, there is still more that needs to be done to prevent the UK’s overseas territories being a conduit for opaque company formation linked to key Tajik players. However, there should be scope for both the UK and US to consider using Magnitsky sanctions, either through the human rights or corruption routes, and other mechanisms to tackle those responsible for abuse in Tajikistan. On the face of it, given the wider corruption and civil society context, the decision of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) to lift Tajikistan’s suspension in January 2020 seems baffling.[11] Oleg Antonov, Edward Lemon and Parviz Mullojonov note in their essay there is a need for caution when engaging with Tajikistan’s universities given the extent of pressure potential local partners are under. They argue that faced with this situation, external academic partners should engage selectively and raise human rights concerns, using an approach of critical engagement.[12] This is of particular relevance given the context in which those in the education system are forced or induced to participate in the organised trolling of political opponents. When thinking about the ‘Factory of Answers’ there is more that social media providers can be doing to support victims of state organised trolling and smear campaigns, including the targeting of those based in the diaspora. This includes finding ways to expand access to moderation in Tajik, identifying fake accounts, improving internal redress mechanisms to enable victims to receive swifter action, (particularly for those who have been victims of repeated abuse) and improving sensitivity to the use of sexual smears and other tactics particularly targeted at women. Donors need to consider what additional support can be given to victims of such targeting including psychosocial support and assistance with documenting cases of abuse. Western countries need to do a better job in responding to the needs of Tajiks seeking refuge from pressures at home. The Poland-Belarus border, that can be reached by travel overland from Russia, has been a significant source of problems with Tajiks being prevented, sometimes for months, from crossing into Poland to claim asylum and subsequently being deported from Belarus back to Tajikistan once the security services had caught wind of what was going on.[13] The case of Hizbullo Shovalizoda, deported from Austria unlawfully according to the belated ruling of its Supreme Court, highlights the clear need for Interior Ministries and Immigration Services in these countries to properly understand the human rights situation in Tajikistan, particularly the ways in which claims of ‘extremism’ are used to target political opponents and how it has abused Interpol’s red notice system in the past. While recognising that general rules on family reunification are getting tighter in a number of countries, including the UK, it is important that Western Governments are fully aware of the pressures that family members of activists can face and they need to find new ways to allow relatives to join those in exile when families themselves are targeted. There also needs to be greater recognition amongst European asylum systems about the dangers posed, even for ordinary citizens, in returning to Tajikistan, particularly when the person is religiously observant. Western security services need to be aware of the ways in which Tajikistan works extra-territorially to apply pressure and target those in the diaspora. This includes not only the well-documented cases of violence committed against exiled activists, but the ways in which pressure is put on other members of Tajikistan’s diaspora (often by pressuring their families back home) to harass those activists.[14]  Though stretching somewhat beyond the scope of this publication, it is clear that efforts need to be redoubled to attempt to restore Russia’s (previously patchy but now dramatically reduced) compliance with its obligations to the European Court of Human Rights, particularly as it relates to respecting Rule 39 interim measures to halt cases of the rapid deportations of Tajiks in breach of Russian and international law. So overall Tajikistan, after almost 30 years of independence, finds itself in a very difficult place, combining extreme poverty with a political system that brooks no dissent and a civic space that has dramatically shrunk. Western international actors have limited opportunities to influence the situation in a positive direction, but it is important that they seek to use what leverage they have to resist further backsliding and put pressure on the regime to curb its excesses. Money remains the most important lever, whether that is looking at what more can be done to condition or review international aid, investment and lending, or taking action where corrupt financial flows from the Tajik elite penetrate the international financial system. Beyond the country there is a lot more to do to protect activists in exile from harassment and extradition by a regime that does not see national borders as a barrier to its repression. Recommendations In light of the research and analysis set out in this publication, this author seeks to make a number of possible recommendations for action.[15] For the Government of Tajikistan There are a great many areas where the Government of Tajikistan needs to reform to comply with the international commitments it has signed up to, far more than can be reasonably included here. However, below is a broad selection of some of the things that it should seek to do. It should:
  • End the harassment of regime critics at home and abroad and the use of torture in its penal and criminal justice systems;
  • Remove the sections of the criminal code that prohibit the ‘insult’ of the President and public officials;
  • Limit the application of anti-extremism legislation to widely recognised violent groups and individual acts of violence, preventing its abuse against political opponents;
  • Address widespread corruption at the heart of the state and take steps to reduce conflict of interest for state officials;
  • Restore political pluralism by allowing independent parties to register, lowering signature requirements to stand for public office, while allowing independent candidates to stand;
  • Reform the office of the Ombudsman and create new independent mechanisms for investigating torture and abuse of power by police and security officials;
  • Improve training for investigative bodies on conducting investigations of torture and ill-treatment and develop a comprehensive rehabilitation programme for torture victims with a particular focus on women;
  • End mandatory medical examination for every citizen seeking to get married and the use of HIV tests as a de facto requirement for many jobs and for access to education;
  • Cease the blocking of websites of independent news outlets and citizens groups;
  • End the propiska system of internal movement registration and restrictions;
  • Make the General Plans of Dushanbe and other cities more accessible and involve citizens in their development;
  • Reform and expand the listing process for properties and areas of architectural and heritage value with input from local citizens;
  • Develop measures to promote women’s participation in employment and public office; and
  • Tackle domestic violence, sexual harassment and abuse of the LGBTQ community.
 For Western Countries and international organisationsThey should seek to:
  • Review investments by IFIs and aid schemes that provide budget support to the Government of Tajikistan;
  • Implement Magnitsky sanctions and other anti-corruption measures against those in the system responsible for human rights abuses and graft;
  • Provide better support for victims of state organised trolling campaigns and urge social media companies to improve content moderation in Tajik and streamline complaints procedures;
  • Pause EU efforts to create a new Enhanced Partnership and Cooperation Agreement and to add Tajikistan to the GSP + scheme;
  • Add Tajikistan to the UK’s list of Human Rights Priority Countries; and
  • Improve access to asylum and temporary refuge for Tajiks at risk, including measures to assist family reunification where the relatives of activists have been targeted for abuse.
 Image by Kalpak Travel under (CC). [1] Avery Koop, Mapped: The 25 Poorest Countries in the World, Visual Capitalist, April 2021, https://www.visualcapitalist.com/mapped-the-25-poorest-countries-in-the-world/; Tajikistan’s position is slightly better when it is ranked by purchasing power parity.[2] Realistically this in cases without a link to the IRPT.[3] Bluntly given the nature of politics in Tajikistan the quotas for women candidates proposed by Dilbar Turakhanova could be achieved by amending the party rules of the People's Democratic Party of Tajikistan without the need to formally enshrine this in law.[4] Excluding emergency COVID-related relief.[5] RBRD, Faizobod water and wastewater project, May 2021, https://www.ebrd.com/work-with-us/project-finance/project-summary-documents.html?1=1&filterCountry=Tajikistan; Eurasianet, Breaking Tajikistan’s banks: The north falters as ruling family cements position, April 2018, https://eurasianet.org/breaking-tajikistans-banks-the-north-falters-as-ruling-family-cements-position[6] The World Bank, Projects Tajikistan, https://projects.worldbank.org/en/projects-operations/projects-list?lang=en&countrycode_exact=TJ&os=0[7] European Commission, New EU-Tajikistan partnership & cooperation agreement – authorisation to open negotiations, June 2020, https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/better-regulation/have-your-say/initiatives/12389-Authorisation-to-open-negotiations-and-negotiate-an-Enhanced-Partnership-and-Cooperation-Agreement-with-Tajikistan[8] Tajikistan is already a participant in the EU’s basic ‘Generalised scheme of preferences’ providing easier market access for developing countries.[9] FCO and FCDO, Corporate report: Human rights priority countries: ministerial statement, January to June 2020, Gov.uk, November 2020, https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/human-rights-priority-countries-autumn-2020-ministerial-statement/human-rights-priority-countries-ministerial-statement-january-to-june-2020[10] United Nations Human Rights Council, Universal Periodic Review, https://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/UPR/Pages/UPRMain.aspx[11] EITI, The Board agreed that Tajikistan has made meaningful progress overall in implementing the 2016 EITI Standard, January 2020, https://eiti.org/board-decision/2020-02; Or perhaps put more charitably they have taken a somewhat narrowly focused assessment of their formal criteria than might have been merited given wider circumstances.[12] See also John Heathershaw and Edward Schatz, Academic freedom in Tajikistan endangered: what is to be done? openDemocracy, February 2018, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/academic-freedom-in-tajikistan-endangered/; Here also are two articles that put forward the case for continuing broader local engagement. Karolina Kluczewska, Academic freedom in Tajikistan: western researchers need to look at themselves, too, ppenDemocracy, February 2018, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/academic-freedom-in-tajikistan/; Malika Bahovadinova, Academic freedom in Tajikistan: why boycotts and blacklists are the wrong response. openDemocracy, February 2018, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/academic-freedom-in-tajikistan-boycotts/[13] See Adam Hug (ed.), Closing the Door: the challenge facing activists from the former Soviet Union seeking asylum or refuge, FPC, December 2017, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/closing-the-door/[14] Exeter University Central Asian Studies Network, Central Asian Political Exiles (CAPE) database https://excas.net/projects/political-exiles/[15] While some of these recommendations build on the analysis and suggestions made by individual essay contributors they are the sole responsibility of the publication’s editor. He is extremely aware that some of the recommendations to the Government of Tajikistan, particularly the initial requests, are somewhat aspirational in nature given the current circumstances. [post_title] => Retreating Rights – Tajikistan: Conclusions and recommendations [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => retreating-rights-tajikistan-conclusions-and-recommendations [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-05-16 20:29:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-05-16 19:29:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://fpc.org.uk/?p=5763 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )[9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5636 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2021-03-16 19:23:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-03-16 18:23:21 [post_content] => The publication of the long awaited Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy, entitled ‘Global Britain in a competitive age’, should finally help give greater clarity  to the UK’s foreign policy and global strategy after the dislocation of the pandemic, organisational restructuring and budget cuts. This very initial response to a 112 page document released a few hours ago does not seek to capture the full complexity of a review that will shape the UK’s policy for years to come. However, it seeks to briefly address some of the key themes, particularly those that were addressed by the Foreign Policy Centre’s Finding Britain’s role in a changing world programme in 2020.[1] There is much to welcome in the text of the Integrated Review (IR). Whether you agree or not with the priorities the Government has chosen, it is very helpful to have them articulated through the IR’s formal statement of what it sees as ‘Our interests and our values’, the articulation of the Prime Minister’s ‘vision for the UK in 2030’ and the four priorities of the ‘Strategic Framework’, between them it gives a consolidated list of the objectives the UK is seeking to pursue, which can help anchor future policy.[2] The IR recognises that the UK’s departure from the EU necessitates a swifter moving, more agile approach to its international action. However, it rightly states that this depends on being able to retain ‘a consistent level of international influence, maintaining the soft and hard power capabilities required to support this’ and that this needs ‘new ways to cooperate through creative diplomacy and multilateralism’ as well as developing an increased competitive edge. The Prime Minister’s vision of the UK being ‘a problem-solving and burden-sharing nation with a global perspective’ is a both a welcome recommitment to this longstanding principle but also a declaration of a notable policy shift. What is clear is that the IR envisages a revised approach to multilateralism that is less focused on post-Cold War institutions (though NATO is mentioned multiple times) and the ‘rules based international system’, but that seeks to respond to a more fragmented and contested world order by being more proactive and adaptive. This approach carries both high risks and high rewards as it is imperative that the UK does still meet its commitment to ‘do more to reinforce parts of the international architecture that are under threat’ (i.e. not leaving existing structures to be dominated by revisionist powers such as China and Russia) while executing its pivot into increased global leadership in regulatory and norm setting institutions, particularly in the technology and data space (and on Space!). It will be essential that a long-term view is taken when assessing what the UK wants to achieve through multilateral systems to avoid perceptions of opportunism and to build trust amongst traditional allies in such forums who recognise the enduring importance of having rules based systems for middle powers, and who may still hold reservations over the UK’s intentions in the wake of Brexit. The UK Government may not be sentimental about multilateralism but many of its partners are more so, not least the Biden administration’s rhetorical commitment to rebuilding traditional alliances (though in practice both recognise the need for urgent institutional reform). The IR rightly addresses the central role of what it calls ‘Systemic Competition’, with a recognition of the challenges of rising authoritarianism creates for the cause of liberal democracy and the stability of existing institutions. The review hardens the UK’s formal posture towards both China and Russia, while recognising that without the ability to retain some space for dialogue, particularly with the former, there will be little prospect of meaningfully addressing global challenges such as climate change. In relation to Russia, the recommitment to the central importance of the Euro-Atlantic region to the UK is welcome to show European partners that despite Brexit the UK still has a lot to offer and that it is still ‘a European country’ albeit one ‘with global interests’. The second strand of the IR’s Strategic Framework, entitled ‘Shaping the open international order of the future’, should help shape the priorities and assist in the UK’s response to this moral and strategic challenge, most notably through the first goal under this strategic priority, which ‘is to support open societies and defend human rights’ as part of the UK’s stated commitment to be ‘a force for good’. The addition of the term ‘sovereignty’ to the IR’s statement of values and interests clearly has echoes of the Brexit debates and will be seen in that light by many. However, it is also being used to reframe the Government’s focus on building domestic legitimacy and accountability for its policies, creating a through line between the national and international in its language on the importance of democracy. The international perceptions of such as statement will need to be managed carefully to prevent the UK from being seen as aligning itself with illiberal powers that use sovereignty rhetoric to ignore international rules and human rights standards. This sovereignty framing helps shape the language contained in the ‘Strengthening security and defence at home and overseas’ section on the resilience of the UK’s democracy.  Much of the language around ‘protecting democracy in the UK, supporting a democratic system that is fair, secure and transparent’ is welcome. However, it contains within it a deeply troubling confirmation that the ‘work programme will include: introducing voter ID at polling stations’. Attempts to mirror US style voter suppression techniques would not only create a threat to the UK’s democratic legitimacy and detract from the other important steps outlined here on disinformation and other issues, it also risks undermining the UK’s ability to promote strengthening electoral systems and access to democratic rights around the world. The IR rightly recognises the UK’s fundamental strengths as a cultural leader, which it dubs as being a ‘Soft Power Super Power’. It also has helpfully shown a greater focus on trade (and its integration with foreign policy and national strategy) than might have been envisaged at the start of the consultation process, nonetheless there is a missed opportunity to make clear the role trade policy can play in encouraging the UK's support for open societies and incentivising human rights in addition to the Government’s focus in this area on open economies. Tackling illicit finance, as well as serious and organised crime, is also a welcome component of the IR’s approach, with the commitment to bring in new Magnitsky sanctions focused on corruption as well as a recognition of the need to tackle money laundering facilitated by the UK. So while there are a number of areas of concern in the document that fall beyond the remit of the FPC’s ‘Finding Britain’s role in a changing world’ project, such as the proposals to increase the UK’s nuclear stockpiles, the overall balance of the text is a positive one that can help shape government policy going forwards. However, it is a review of significant scope and one that will only achieve its goals, particularly the objective of being truly integrated, if it is able to be effectively implemented. Central to that implementation challenge is the level of resource available to deliver its objectives and manage the process of change. Much has already rightly been said about the Government’s decision to cut UK aid spending from 0.7% to 0.5% of a falling national income.[3] The impact of this is being seen in the public debate over the cuts to UK assistance in Yemen, the future of VSO (Voluntary Service Overseas) and other longstanding UK priorities. There is understandable concern, particularly within the development sector, about the shift away from having discrete aid and development priorities and commitments to the UK's aid spending being more instrumentalised to achieve integrated policy goals.  More debate will take place over the coming weeks and months as the reality of some of the shifts in geographical and policy priorities outlined in the IR begin to align with the scale of the budget reductions to significantly reduce the capacity of the UK and its partners in areas of previous strength. For example, on the day of launch, openDemocracy reported that the FCDO’s Open Societies and Human Rights Directorate  was facing a 80% budget cut and the National Crime Agency’s ODA funded work on anti-corruption was also to be significantly cut.[4] Such practical pressures clearly do not align with the strategic vision outlined in the IR. This capacity crunch is brought into even more stark relief by the Government’s new commitment to an ‘Indo-Pacific tilt’, seeking to rebuild its presence East of Suez across the full spectrum of government activity.[5] The IR is clearly a strategy document designed to drive culture change across Whitehall and, as recommended in the FPC’s research, the Government says that it is looking to beef up mechanisms to ensure its implementation. These include ‘a new Performance and Planning Framework and is establishing an Evaluation Taskforce’ as well as departmental ‘Outcome Delivery Plans, against which ministers will receive regular performance reports’. The Integrated Review itself is conspicuously light on detailed policy commitments. The Government has argued that this is by design, allowing the review to be more flexible and adaptive over time, ‘a living document’ in official parlance. However, this reduces the number of measurable objectives against which government performance can be measured, potentially undermining the Government’s stated objective of using the process to build public trust and legitimacy amongst a domestic audience. More thought should be given towards how information from the performance and planning framework and top line information from each department’s Outcome Delivery Plans can be made available to the public and relevant stakeholders to ensure they are able to hold the Government to account on its commitments. Image by FCO under (CC). [1] This comprised five publications and a number of events that sought to inform the public debate around the Integrated Review, https://fpc.org.uk/programmes/finding-britains-role-in-the-world/. The views expressed here represent the personal views of FPC Director Adam Hug based on the ‘Finding Britain’s role in changing world’ research in 2020.[2] There may still be some benefit in combining these three strands in the IR document into one integrated list. FPC, The principles for Global Britain, September 2020, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/the-principles-for-global-britain/[3] Addressed in the FPC’s project in 2020.[4] Peter Geoghegan, UK government plans 80% cuts to world-leading anti-corruption work, openDemocracy, March 2021, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/opendemocracyuk/uk-government-plans-80-cuts-to-world-leading-anti-corruption-work/[5] The cost and benefits of such a tilt are addressed in the FPC previous work. [post_title] => Building on the Integrated Review [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => building-on-the-integrated-review [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-03-17 09:59:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-03-17 08:59:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://fpc.org.uk/?p=5636 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )[10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5612 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2021-03-01 00:14:40 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-02-28 23:14:40 [post_content] => Kyrgyzstan has just experienced another period of rapid and chaotic change, the third time the country has overthrown an incumbent President in the last 15 years. This publication shows how the roots of the problem run deep. It explores how a culture of corruption and impunity have been at the heart of Kyrgyzstan’s institutional failings, problems that have sometimes been overlooked or downplayed because of the comparison to challenges elsewhere in Central Asia, but that were ruthlessly exposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. The publication tries to explain the recent emergence of the new President Sadyr Japarov in the unrest of October 2020 and what it might mean for the future of Kyrgyzstan. An instinctive anti-elite populist with a powerful personal narrative and a past reputation for economic nationalism Japarov is undertaking a rapid consolidation of power, including through controversial constitutional reform. Liberal minded civil society has been under increasing pressure throughout the last decade. They have faced successive governments increasingly seeking to regulate and pressure them and a rising tide of nationalism that has seen hatred against civil society activists expressed on the streets and online, particularly due to the weaponisation of work on women’s and LGBTQ rights. The publication proposes a root and branch rethink of donor initiatives in Kyrgyzstan to take stock of the situation and come again with new ways to help, including the need for greater flexibility to respond to local issues, opportunities for new ideas and organisations to be supported, and a renewed focus on governance, transparency and accountability. Magnitsky sanctions and global anti-corruption measures can be used to respond to the ways corrupt elites have stashed their earnings abroad and they can also be used to seek redress where justice is unlikely to be served in Kyrgyzstan, such as in the tragic case of Azimjan Askarov. There is scope to better condition potential trade, aid and investment incentives to human rights benchmarks. The publication suggests areas for further amendment in the drafting of Kyrgyzstan’s new constitution and calls for more action from social media companies to protect activists and journalists who are subject to harassment. The international community should be under no illusions about the scale of the challenges Kyrgyzstan faces. It should take swift action to prevent further backsliding on rights and freedoms, while finding new ways to help resolve Kyrgyzstan’s systemic problems. Recommendations for the Government of Kyrgyzstan, international institutions and Western donors:
  • Ensure a rigorous focus on issues of corruption, hatred and impunity;
  • Undertake a systemic review of international donor funded projects in Kyrgyzstan including budget support, the use of consultancies and working with NGOs. It should look at both objectives and implementation, based on evidence and widespread engagement;
  • Find ways to empower fresh thinking and new voices, while giving partners the space and resources to adapt to local priorities;
  • Encourage the Japarov Government to develop a new National Human Rights Action Plan;
  • Increase human rights and governance conditionality in order to unlock stalled EU and UK partnership agreements, debt relief, further government related aid and new investment;
  • Deploy Magnitsky Sanctions and anti-corruption mechanisms more widely on Kyrgyzstan;
  • Expand Kyrgyz language moderation on social media and strengthen redress mechanisms;
  • Push for further amendments to the draft constitution to protect NGOs, trade unions, free speech and minority rights, and avoid increasing the power of the Prosecutor General; and
  • Explore new mechanisms for civic consultation, learning from local practices in Kyrgyzstan, consultative bodies in other developing countries and the use of Citizens Assemblies.
 Image by Sludge G under (CC). [post_title] => Retreating Rights - Kyrgyzstan: Executive Summary [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => retreating-rights-kyrgyzstan-executive-summary [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-02-28 23:00:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-02-28 22:00:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://fpc.org.uk/?p=5612 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )[11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5607 [post_author] => 3 [post_date] => 2021-03-01 00:13:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-02-28 23:13:21 [post_content] => Introduction: Examining the pressure on human rights in Kyrgyzstan This publication, Retreating Rights, is an attempt to take stock of another period of rapid and chaotic change in Kyrgyzstan, looking at how the country arrived at its current situation and assessing what can be done next.[1] The roots of where the country now finds itself run deep, deeper than many of the institutions Kyrgyzstan has built up over the years, and a more detailed analysis of these structural questions is covered in the second half of this introduction and in many of the essay contributions. When this project was initially conceived in Autumn 2019 the storm clouds of nationalism and corruption over the country had been gathering for some time (and in many respects had always been there), before a weak response to COVID and pent-up frustration with a self-interested ruling class triggered the third overthrow of a government in little over 15 years. Kyrgyzstan’s relative openness, at least when compared to its Central Asian neighbours, has often masked some of the deep and deepening challenges on governance and human rights issues. The roiling intra-elite competition and concerns over corruption have driven two previous revolutions, a contentious election in 2017 and the violent siege and arrest of former President Almazbek Atambayev in August 2019. The country is also dealing with the legacy of inter-communal violence targeted mainly at the ethnic Uzbek minority in Southern Kyrgyzstan, with discrimination against that community and the suppression of their language and property rights not satisfactorily resolved. The tragic death of political prisoner Azimjan Askarov in 2020 is a legacy of this grim situation and a symbol of the continuing communal tensions. Over the last decade, and particularly in recent years, civil society activists have tried to raise the alarm about the increasing challenges they faced from the bureaucratic pressure, security service snooping and nationalist backlash, but too often these concerns have been minimised, informed in part by a desire to retain the idea of Kyrgyzstan as the Central Asian success story when it came to human rights and civic freedoms, even as poverty and other development metrics showed much more limited progress. As recently as June 2020 international partners such as the EU were arguing that ‘the overall human rights situation remained stable and is considered as the most advanced in the region. The government remained committed to its human rights agenda and adopted relevant documents for its implementation, e.g. the National Human Rights Action Plan 2019-2021.’[2] Incremental mounting concerns were too often overlooked until it became too late to stop more profound change. The ‘frog’ of Kyrgyzstan’s political wellbeing had been gently boiled over several years before the pan bubbled over in late 2020, leaving serious, overdue questions about the long-term health of that metaphorical amphibian that this publication seeks to answer. How we got here: a brief history of Kyrgyzstan The land that is now Kyrgyzstan has been home to a series of step civilisations including the Yenisei Kyrgyz Khaganate (likely to have been formed by ancestors of the modern Kyrgyz people) before its conquest by other step peoples including most notably the Mongol Empire in the thirteenth century.[3] The folk history of this initial founding period (in the ninth century) is shaped by the events told in the Epic of Manas, one of the world’s longest poems, which has been used heavily by modern Kyrgyzstan as the basis for its national identity.[4] The Kyrgyz remained predominantly as nomadic tribes in what is now Kyrgyzstan and the surrounding regions, interacting with the Chinese and other settled empires such as the Timurids to the south. First contact between the Kyrgyz tribes and Katherine the Great’s Russia took place in 1775 and just over a 100 years later (in 1876) the land and its people were taken and absorbed into the Russian Empire. The Soviets established the Kara-Kirghiz Autonomous Oblast within the Russia Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR) in 1924 which would gradually evolve in 1936 into the Kirghiz Soviet Socialist Republic, a full constituent republic of the Soviet Union. Shortly before the dissolution of the Soviet Union the President of the Kirghiz Academy of Science Askar Akayev won the Presidency after stalemate between more established Communist Party figures. Akayev would lead the new Republic of Kyrgyzstan until 2005, moving further than his Central Asian peers down the road of economic and political liberalisation. Although less authoritarian than his fellow post-Soviet Central Asian leaders the level of corruption steadily grew through his time in office. How we got here: 2005- 2020Despite having previously promised to retire as mandated at the end of his third term in 2005, rumours swirled that Akayev planned a managed transfer of power to one of his children or to break the term limits that would have prevented him standing again. Protests against his government escalated across the country, particularly in response to strong concerns of ballot rigging in the February 2005 parliamentary election, that culminated in Akayev fleeing the country (and resuming his academic career in Moscow), a sequence of events known as the Tulip Revolution.[5] Leader of the protest movement, former Prime Minister Kurmanbek Bakiyev became both interim Prime Minister and Acting President and would subsequently win the July 2005 elections that followed Akayev’s ouster. Like his predecessor Bakiyev would promise reform and then became mired in increasingly egregious corruption, as a number of authors in this collection note. Amid an energy crisis (with rolling blackouts and spiralling costs), opposition to Bakiyev’s corruption crystallised into protests and riots that escalated into the capture of key government buildings and the White House (home to the Parliament and Presidential Administration) with around 65 deaths before the resignation of Bakiyev in April 2010. However his supporters would continue to mobilise in the south of the country leading to unrest that culminated in the June 2010 riots in Osh that predominantly targeted the ethnic Uzbek population who had been seen to be supportive of those who had ousted Bakiyev, though the roots of the dispute lie much deeper as explained in this publication. Bakiyev, along with many of his family and entourage, sought and gained asylum in Belarus, including the bizarre case of former Prime Minister Daniyar Usenov who is believed to have changed is name and now serving as the director of the Belarus National Biotechnology Corp, while Bakiyev’s son Maxim gained asylum in the UK.[6] Roza Otunbayeva, who had previously been a key figure alongside Bakiyev in 2005, served as President on a short-term basis following the passage of the July 2010 Constitution in a referendum that saw the transfer of significant powers from the Presidency to the Parliament (the Jogorku Kenesh or Supreme Council). Otunbayeva was succeeded as President in December 2011 by the Prime Minister Almazbek Atambayev. Again, as a number of authors in this collection show, he came in promising reform and left with a reputation for corruption and mismanagement. However, so far uniquely in post-Soviet Kyrgyzstan, he made it to the end of his term of office. Atambayev was able to hand over power in 2017 to his hand-picked successor and Social Democratic Party of Kyrgyzstan (SDPK) colleague, the Prime Minister Sooronbay Jeenbekov, in an election that was broadly free but far from entirely fair, marred by misuse of vote buying and use of administrative resources.[7] Yet upon taking office the relationship between the two men swiftly fractured with a flurry of legal cases against Atambayev and his inner circle, culminating in an armed stand-off at Atambayev’s home compound and his subsequent arrest and conviction for 11 years on corruption charges and manslaughter charges still pending. The SDPK fractured between pro-Jeenbekov and pro-Atambayev factions, with many of the former ultimately coalescing around the Birimdik (Unity) party to act as the ‘party of power’ ahead of the 2020 elections. Kyrgyzstan’s reputation as an ‘Island of Democracy’ has been repeated often throughout the country’s post-Soviet history as a point of comparison to its neighbours, but throughout said history there have been significant concerns about its political health.[8] At the very least it is worth pointing out that every elected President has either been removed from office by protests or been subsequently imprisoned after their term had expired.[9] The country remains the second poorest in the post-Soviet space, with a GDP per capita of $1,309 (actual USD or $5,485 PPP) and massive levels of migration, in particular to Russia that sees remittances form 28.5 per cent of the Kyrgyzstan’s GDP.[10] The Transparency International Corruption Perception Index (CPI) places the country at 124th in the world and despite the lingering perception of Kyrgyzstan’s democratic bona fides Freedom House’s Nations in Transit Report has repeatedly classified Kyrgyzstan as a Consolidated Authoritarian Regime, with an overall score for political freedoms of 11 out of 100 and an albeit slightly better 27 out of 100 for Civil Liberties.[11] In 2016, Kyrgyzstan only narrowly avoided introducing a Russia-style foreign agents law after intense pressure from Kyrgyz civil society and Western donor governments and many NGOs have reported continuing pressure from the authorities and non-state actors linked to powerful interests.[12] As set out later in this section and in many of the essays, nationalism has been on the rise over the last ten years to become a major mobilising force in Kyrgyzstan’s public life.[13] This has manifested itself in many different ways, but particularly in the form of both anti-Western and anti-Chinese sentiments, a growing hostility to local Russian speakers (though rarely to Russia itself) and ongoing tensions over women’s rights issues and with ethnic and sexual minorities. From late 2018 onwards a series of protests began against Chinese migrants (both real and perceived), Chinese investments in the country and around the treatment of ethnic Kyrgyz in China.[14] In August 2019, protests erupted at the Solton-Sary mine, owned by the Zhong Ji Mining Company, over allegations of environmental damage and poor treatment of Kyrgyz employees.[15] As well as the ethnic and geo-strategic dimension in relation to such protests, the protests tapped into wider concerns about lack of economic progress and the sense that those benefiting from Kyrgyzstan’s resource wealth are not the local population but international investors (and domestic elites). Dissatisfaction and protests against foreign ownership of the Kumtor Gold mine, owned by Canadian mining firm Centerra and accounting for around nine per cent of Kyrgyz GDP, have been a recurring theme of Kyrgyz political debate and was the source both of now President Sadyr Japarov’s initial popularity and his criminal conviction for a kidnapping that occurred as part of pro-nationalisation protests he led in 2013.[16] 2020 began with further protests against perceived Chinese economic encroachment, ultimately leading to plans for a $275 million Sino-Kyrgyz logistics center in the Naryn Free Economic Zone near the Chinese border to be scrapped.[17] Women’s rights have become a particular flashpoint between women’s rights protesters (along with their supporters in liberal civil society) and nationalist counter-demonstrators. In late 2019, the Femminale of Contemporary Art, an exhibition of feminist art by Kyrgyz and international artists at the National Museum of Fine Arts in Bishkek became the centre of protest.[18] The backlash by protesting nationalists groups against the display (that included Kazakh artist Zoya Falkova’s Evermust, a punching bag made into the shape of a female torso to highlight domestic violence) lead to the Ministry of Culture censoring some of the exhibits and forcing the resignation of the Museum’s curator amid death threats against her.[19] International Women’s Day (March 8th) has also long been a flashpoint between the two faces modern Kyrgyzstan and in 2020 it again became a point of conflict. As Eric McGlinchey puts it in his essay, ‘on March 8, 2020—International Women’s Day—a group of masked men wearing Ak-kalpaks, traditional Kyrgyz hats, attacked a group of activists who had gathered on Victory Square to highlight the persistence and acceptance of widespread domestic violence, bride kidnapping, and rape.[20] Revealingly, while the violent attackers were not detained, 50 women’s rights activists were arrested.’[21] How we got here: March-October 2020Ten days after the International Women’s Day protests however normal political life would come shuddering to a halt as the first cases of COVID-19 were identified in Kyrgyzstan. By March 22nd a state of emergency was declared and public transport was shut down in Bishkek, which would evolve into a more substantial lockdown and curfew.[22] As with so many countries around the world, including this author’s own, the ensuing crisis fully exposed the strengths and many weaknesses of the Kyrgyz state. As Ryskeldi Satke’s essay in this collection shows the pandemic overwhelmed the capacity of Kyrgyzstan’s health system (both in terms of beds and staff) and laid bare the endemic problems with governance, lack of transparency and corruption that undermined the country’s ability to cope. Problems included a lack of oxygen and ventilators and the virus running rampant through healthcare workers who were struggling with the lack of PPE and other protections.[23] In the first few months of the pandemic the true picture was also somewhat obscured by cases regularly being misrecorded as cases of pneumonia. Much of the initial response was characterised by an intra-elite blame game. By April 1st President Jeenbekov fired the heads of his COVID taskforce, Health Minister Kosmosbek Cholponbayev and Deputy Prime Minister Altynai Omurbekova over perceived failings in the initial response.[24] Cholponbayev would subsequently be arrested in September 2020 amid claims of negligence and concerns over a consulting contract he had negotiated.[25] Prime Minister Mukhammedkalyi Abylgaziev would take a leave of absence on May 27th, mid-crisis, and would subsequently resign two weeks later over corruption allegations relating to the sale of national broadcasting frequencies.[26] At Abylgaziev’s leaving party ministers were caught on camera not wearing masks and breaking social distancing rules leading to 28 politicians and officials being fined.[27] Ordinary citizens found the situation chaotic. The implementation of internal movement controls created havoc for the many people whose jobs relied on commuting into major cities such as Bishkek or who had been living in those cities without the formal propiska registration documents.[28] The crisis also saw Kyrgyzstan take on significant amounts of emergency funding from international institutions, $627.3 million by July 2020, triggering further concerns about transparency and accountability of how the money was spent.[29] However, as so often in cases of state failure in Kyrgyzstan, volunteers stepped into the breach to provide support in hospitals and other health care facilities.[30] Come 2021 and the Japarov administration would announce that the previous Government significantly under counted the death rate, with more than 4,000 having died in the initial 2020 outbreak compared to the previously quoted figure of 1,393.[31] The crisis also not only necessitated the restriction of civil liberties on public health grounds seen around the world but it provided the Government with opportunities to further restrict media and political freedoms. As Elira Turdubaeva points out in her essay, independent media was not able to operate outside during the lockdown period, the Parliament tried to proceed with laws designed to increase bureaucratic measures on NGOs and the security services ramped up arrests of social media users who criticised the Government response to the pandemic (including medical workers protesting the lack of PPE).[32] Despite the social and economic turmoil ahead of the Parliamentary elections, it initially seemed that the contests would simply act as an intra-elite competition between oligarchs and local power brokers, as the party system reshaped itself following the implosion of the SPDK.[33] It soon became clear that much of the activity was centred around jostling between forces directly aligned with President Jeenbekov (including his brother Asylbek), which coalesced around the Birimdik party (Party of Democratic Socialism—Eurasian Choice ‘Unity’), and forces close to the powerful Matraimov family network (about more of which below), which acted through the also notionally pro-Jeenbekov Mekenim Kırgızstan (‘My Homeland Is Kyrgyzstan’) party. Rules prohibiting the use of volunteers entrenched the capacity gap between the well-resourced efforts of Birimdik, Mekenim Kirgizstan and Kanatbek Isaev’s Kyrgyzstan party (also seen as being pro-Jeenbekov), and their rivals.[34] However, perhaps more important than formal campaign spending was the continuation of large-scale vote buying, a common practice in past elections, which this time also included the abuse of pandemic related charitable initiatives, as well as the traditional abuse of administrative resources (the coercion of state institutions and employees) to back pro-Jeenbekov candidates (albeit often against one another in internecine contests that devolved into brawls on more than one occasion).[35] 16 of the 17 Parties in the October election signed up to the Central Election Commission (CEC) code of conduct on hate speech but this was often ignored online during in the campaign. Here: October 2020 onwardsOn election day itself, October 4th, social media was awash with images of electoral shenanigans including videos of vote buying, voting for multiple people and suspected ‘carousel’ voting (where people vote in multiple polling locations, potentially abusing the ability to temporarily change voting addresses).[36] The OSCE Final Election monitoring report subsequently noted that its observation mission had received ‘numerous credible reports from interlocutors throughout the country about instances of vote buying and abuse of administrative resources.’[37] In the preliminary results, Birimdik narrowly bested Mekenim Kirgizstan by 24.50 per cent to 23.79 per cent (which would have equated to 46 and 45 seats respectively in the 120 seat Supreme Council (Jogorku Kenesh), with Kyrgyzstan some way behind on 8.7 per cent and 16 provisional seats.[38] The fourth party to scrape over the seven per cent electoral threshold was the only party not to be openly and explicitly aligned with President Jeenbekov, the nationalist Bütün Kırgızstan (‘United Kyrgyzstan’), led by 2011 and 2017 Presidential election also-ran Adakhan Madumarov. This result was despite pre-election polling clearly showing that only a third of the electorate approved of the incumbent Government’s pandemic response.[39] Protests on Bishkek's Ala-Too Square and outside the CEC began as early as the announcement of the provisional results on the evening of October 4th, led by campaigners for the many parties that had failed to clear the electoral threshold and therefore would not hold seats in the new Supreme Council. By the following morning protesters were on the streets of Bishkek in significant numbers protesting the results and the open levels of fraud that had gone on the day before. By that afternoon and into the evening Ala-Too Square was full with thousands of protesters, waving flags and singing the national anthem.[40] By this stage sources in President Jeenbekov’s Birimdik were already saying that they were open to the election being re-run. However, later into the evening the situation deteriorated into violence as police attempted to disperse the protestors, both those outside the White House and the square with water cannon, stun grenades and tear gas, escalating the tension.[41] By 3am the protesters had broken into the White House, including into President Jeenbekov’s office, and the State Committee for National Security (GKNB).[42] Among those released from the GKNB building included former President Atambayev and a former Member of Parliament Sadyr Japarov.[43] While Atambayev would attempt to somewhat awkwardly join the protesting opposition groups in Ala-Too Square, something that weakened the liberal camp’s legitimacy and that Asel Doolotkeldieva argues fundamentally weakened its negotiating position with Jeenbekov, Japarov was joined by his own supporters, that included amongst their number mixture of nationalist groups and ‘Sportsmeni’, who would ultimately coalesce around the City’s Old Square.[44] Less than a day after his release from prison Japarov would be find himself proclaimed as the country’s interim Prime Minister, late on October 6th, by a group of Parliamentarians from the pre-October 4th Supreme Council who had hunkered down in the Dostuk Hotel, though this meeting would be broken up by opposition supporters decrying the legitimacy of this impromptu, inquorate gathering. With President Jeenbekov absent from the scene, beyond the occasional video calling for calm, competing factions on the street proclaimed the support for their own leaderships, with young entrepreneur Tilek Toktogaziev being proposed by the liberal opposition. Tensions would ultimately come to a head on October 9th with street brawls between Japarov and opposition supporters, including a shot being fired at former President Atambayev’s car, that help to firmly tilt the balance of power in favour of Japarov’s supporters at the expense of the disorganised opposition movement and more liberally minded protestors. As Bishkek was gripped by political upheaval another force made its presence felt on the streets in the absence of effective police control, the druzhinniki (volunteer civil defence units).[45] These volunteers fanned out across the city to protect shops and other businesses to prevent a repeat of the looting that followed the revolutions in 2005 and 2010.[46] Japarov would again be declared Prime Minister on October 10th and 14th in incrementally more formal votes of the Parliament and amid claims of intimidation of its members by Japarov’s supporters.[47] On October 15th, Jeenbekov finally resigned and Japarov would take his place (and that of Prime Minster) on an interim basis, completing his transition from prisoner to President in ten days.[48] In summary, the brief hopes that the opposition was uniting and able to come up with an alternative to the status quo came to naught as the enthusiastic but unprepared activists could not decide on how to seize their momentum, beset by tensions between younger activists and older, often discredited, opposition politicians who tried to ride the nascent revolution back to relevance.[49] Into the vacuum stepped a more organised alternative in Japarov, combining new mobilisation techniques, an outsider persona and a genuine personal following but with ties to old players, particularly those around former President Bakiyev and suspicions of ties to many of the shadowy forces that had previously participated in the rigged election.[50] The rise of JaparovSadyr Japarov first came to limited public notice in the wake of the 2005 Tulip Revolution as a Parliamentarian and then advisor to then President Kurmanbek Bakiyev, serving a stint at the National Agency for the Prevention of Corruption at a time of widespread corruption allegations against those close to Bakiyev. Following the 2010 revolution Japarov initially followed Bakiyev to Osh and was present in the city during the inter-ethnic conflict between Kyrgyz nationalists and ethnic Uzbeks.[51] He resurfaced after the violence as an MP for former Minister of Emergency Situations Kamchybek Tashiev’s nationalist Ata-Zhurt party, which supported overturning the 2010 referendum that watered down the powers of the Presidency and argued for the return of Bakiyev. However it was through his campaign against the Canadian ownership of the Kumtor mine that brought him to prominence, popularity and notoriety.[52] In 2012 a protest Japarov organised, protesting the amount of tax the mine owner Centerra was paying and calling for the nationalisation of the mine, turned violent after an incendiary speech by Tashiev that was seen by some as implying that they should occupy the White House. Some of the protesters duly tried to break in and there were claims that Tashiev tried to lead protesters over the fence.[53] Both Japarov and Tashiev faced criminal charges and they were stripped of their seats in Parliament as part of the settlement of the case.[54] In 2013 Japarov’s campaign against Kumtor escalated into months of protests in the Issyk Kul region near the mine. In October 2013 Government representative Emil Kaptagaev, who had attempted to speak to protestors, was bundled into a car that was then doused with petrol and threatened to be set alight.[55] Japarov himself was not present at this point, having travelled abroad a few days earlier, but was charged with inciting the violence. He would stay in exile until 2017 when he returned to Kyrgyzstan and was subsequently jailed for an 11.5 year term for his role in the kidnapping of Kaptagaev, this was despite Kaptagaev himself criticising the trial and saying that “fairness in the justice system has died”.[56] During the time Japarov spent in pre-trial detention and in prison his son and parents would pass away and he survived a suicide attempt, adding to a public persona of a politician who was personally suffering for his campaigning against vested interests. Despite being in prison Japarov served as leader of the Mekenchil (‘Patriotic’) party alongside his longstanding political partner Tashiev who served as its chairman. In the disputed elections of October 4th Mekenchil would receive the highest share of the vote of those parties not due to enter the new Supreme Council with 6.85 per cent, just below the seven per cent threshold for receiving seats. However, given the scale of vote buying by other parties, this was not a particularly helpful indicator of Japarov’s support, or at least his potential support. Joldon Kutmanaliev and Gulzat Baialieva show, in their essay in this collection and in their previous research, how Facebook played a crucial role in building his political brand; how WhatsApp was crucial in marshalling supporters to fill the crucial political vacuum that followed the rigged elections, and how he and his team built a following on Instagram and the Russian social network Odnoklassniki to create an organic social media presence that dwarfed other political figures who were more reliant on traditional methods of political horse-trading and vote buying.[57] The political messages that would churn within these groups sought to burnish Japarov’s reputation as a popular hero who stood up against the corrupt elite over Kumtor and was unjustly imprisoned, an economic populism and nationalism that was a central part of his image. Such narratives would overlap with more socially conservative nationalist rhetoric and anti-Western sentiment, particularly around pages linked to the Mekenchil party, built on the ground swell of nationalist and neo-conservative sentiment that had fermented in recent years.[58] These narratives and numbers were able to mobilise Japarov’s supporters, particularly amongst the rural population and unemployed former migrant workers returned from Russia, to build their own independent presence on the streets of Bishkek that would ultimately overwhelm the forces of the State, the liberally minded (and often urban) young activists and the more traditional opposition groups. What Sadyr did nextThe day after his assentation to the Interim Presidency Japarov installed his long-time political partner Kamchybek Tashiev as head of the security services, solidifying his hold on the levers of power.[59] At Tashiev’s direction a number of well publicised, and some would argue stage managed, moves took place to signal that the new leadership was taking action on corruption.[60] This included the arrest and pre-trial detention of Raiymbek Matraimov and the announcement of an investigation into 40 people believed to be part of his network.[61] As part of a 30 day ‘economic amnesty’ whereby former officials and other past beneficiaries of corruption could repay their ill-gotten gains to the Government, it was claimed Matraimov agreed to transfer two billion soms ($23.6 million) back to the state in return for a pardon.[62] At the same time it was noted that the network of fake accounts run by organised troll farms linked to Matraimov and who had previously been actively promoting Mekenim Kırgızstan turned their attention to supporting the new interim President.[63] Around the country, local officials with ties to the Jeenbekov Government were removed from their posts. In the initial chaos figures from the Bakiyev-era, such as former Mayor of Bishkek Nariman Tuleev and Melis Myrzakhmetov, the controversial former Mayor of Osh heavily implicated in the 2010 inter-ethnic violence, tried to return in their former posts (and in Tuleev’s case briefly succeeded) before less contentious supporters of the new regime could be installed in acting control of key posts.[64] Amid the chaos and factional horse-trading, positions of power in the cabinet and institutions were rapidly filled with people with personal and political connections to Japarov and Tashiev. One of the few exceptions, an attempted olive branch to opposition protesters, was the entrepreneur, turned opposition activist, turned less successful self-proclaimed president Tilek Toktogaziev who would find himself Minister of Agriculture in the interim administration.[65] Attempts at formal legitimacy for all manoeuvres taken by the interim Government rested on the approval of members of a Supreme Council whose mandate had ended on October 15th. However instead of swiftly pursuing efforts to re-run the Parliamentary elections, the initial demand of the protestors who had filled the Bishkek streets, Japarov instead focused on his own political priorities.[66] These priorities included legitimising his hold on power through a new Presidential Election and delivering a long-held political goal of unravelling the post-2010 constitutional settlement in order to increase the power of the Presidency, a role which of course he now held. A one million dollar public affairs and PR contract was agreed, apparently funded by a supportive businessman, to help bolster the international image of the new political setup.[67] So, after less than a month in the job, on November 14th Japarov relinquished the role of interim President in order to campaign for snap Presidential elections that were now to take place on January 10th 2021. Talant Mamytov, a deputy from Tashiev’s former Ata-Zhurt party, became the new Acting President having been elected as the speaker of the zombie Parliament earlier in November in a choreographed move to enable Japarov to run.[68] Artem Novikov, a young civil servant who had been acting as Japarov’s First Deputy Prime Minister, became the acting Prime Minister. The second half of the double bill also announced for January 10th was Japarov’s promised constitutional referendum to approve a return to a strong Presidential system. The referendum that was initially due to approve the draft constitution was agreed on November 17th by the Supreme Council, with only four Parliamentarians voting against the plebiscite (Dastan Bekeshev, Aisuluu Mamashova, Natalya Nikitenko and Kanybek Imanaliev). However only 64 MPs (out of 120) were actually present for this huge decision, a reflection not only of the controversial nature of the proposal but that a constitutional process was being directed by a body sitting unconstitutionally beyond its original mandate.[69] In the wake of publication there was widespread confusion about what had happened with a number of the listed signatories denying they had seen or approved it and did not actually support some of the measures.[70] The initial draft of the new constitution was, unsurprisingly, in-line with Japarov’s thinking and the priorities for reform of some of the nationalist groups that had coalesced around him.[71] This included articles that would create the long-mooted ‘People’s Kurultai’, a deliberative forum based on the traditional consultative body of nomadic tradition. The Kurultai movement was seen by both some of its proponents and opponents as a way to usurp the role and function of the existing Supreme Council.[72] Regional examples that claim some link to this heritage include the Assembly of People of Kazakhstan, comprising representatives of local assemblies, and the People’s Council in Turkmenistan (at times called the Council of Elders) both which act as rubber stamp bodies for those country’s political leadership given authoritarian control over the way members are elected. The proposed constitution incorporated Japarov’s priorities for strengthening the Presidency including allowing the office holder to stand for two five year terms and enshrining the President’s appointment of and control over the Prime Minister and the Cabinet, as well as agency heads and local officials. It also proposed reducing the size of the Supreme Council from 120 to 90 members. A source of significant international outcry was to be found in draft clause 23 that sought to prohibit the distribution of media or information that ‘contradict generally recognised moral values, traditions of the peoples of Kyrgyzstan’ or which ‘can be harmful morality and culture’.[73] The work of determining what this new proposed constitution actually would mean in practice was handed to a new Constitutional Council, who were to publicly deliberate and expand on the proposed changes.[74] However by December 10th, amid internal wrangling, protests from civil society and backlash from the international community, attempts to put a full constitutional draft on the ballot in January were scrapped with instead voters being asked if they would prefer a Presidential or Parliamentary Republic, with the details to be determined after later.[75] The liberal leaning elements of the opposition, demoralised after the October events focused on challenging the process as illegitimate and on successfully watering down the scope of the referendum to prevent it adopting the initial draft. As the overwhelming front-runner and despite facing no challengers who could plausibly find a path to victory Japarov took a cautious approach to the campaign, avoiding public debates between the candidates. The election and referendum day itself was far less eventful than in October.[76] Turnout was low, 39.75 per cent and 39.88 per cent respectively, but of those that did vote Japarov won comfortably with 79 per cent of the vote while the Presidential model was supported by 80 per cent of people in the referendum.[77] A number of factors can be seen to lie behind the drop in turnout, including the time of year, concerns over the pandemic and the perception that the result was not in any doubt. Many opposition figures were disputing the legitimacy of the process and, as a number of our authors note, Japarov’s campaign used a notably lower amount of direct vote buying than in October or other previous elections. This is in part due to it not being needed as much given the capture of administrative resources in the period since October, Japarov’s own personal following and a recognition that gratuitous displays of corruption could potentially undermine that support. Public support for radically empowering the Presidency, which carries clear risks of a slide into authoritarianism, can be seen not only as a response to recent chaos and the roiling sea of factions and faces over the last ten years but perhaps also a recognition that after having three Presidents removed from power the last 15 years some people believe it is easier to remove a President than it is to truly shift the wider web of political forces that underpin the parties and Parliament, at least according to some local observers. By early February a new, smaller Cabinet was formed of 16 members rather than 48, with many ministries and government agencies being consolidated.[78] The Cabinet is led by the former President of the Court of Auditors Ulukbek Maripov, with Artem Novikov reverting to the role of first Deputy Prime Minister.[79] Critics of Japarov who had been co-opted into the interim cabinet, such as Elvira Surabaldieva and Tilek Toktogaziev unsurprisingly did not retain their posts.[80] Upon the announcement that Maripov would take charge of the Government, small protests were held against the appointment focused on allegations against the new Prime Minister’s father, a former Parliamentarian.[81] As so often happens in the wake of a shift in power in Kyrgyzstan, legal action is ramping up against officials of the former regime implicated in wrong doing and/or who had punished those close to the new ruling elite when they were out of power. However the speed and scale (including two of Japarov’s previous Presidential rivals and many senior figures in the previous Government) of this process gives additional cause for concern. On February 9th Parliament published the revised draft constitution following the deliberation of the Constitutional Convention.[82] The Legal Clinic Adilet note that there had been a number of positive changes compared to the November draft due to public pressure and the work the Convention. They note that ‘Multiple references to the supremacy of moral values ​​have been excluded, standards are provided for the inadmissibility of slavery and exploitation of child labour, as well as the principle of ensuring the best interests of the child etc. There are new provisions that strengthen human rights guarantees, in particular regarding the provision of social, economic and cultural rights.’[83] The proposals for the People's Kurultai seem to have been watered down, with the body having fewer formal powers than initially suggested, playing a more consultative and advisory role to the existing branches of government, though it is now proposed to play a role in the selection of judges. The draft proposes creating a new ‘chairman of the cabinet of ministers’ who is also head of the Presidential Administration, in effect replacing the position of Prime Minister. However there remain two areas are likely to generate potential concern for NGOs and international observers. The draft Article 8.4 would create a requirement that ‘Political parties, trade unions and other public associations ensure the transparency of their financial and economic activities’, something that may seem innocuous but there are fears it may give constitutional weight to efforts to increase burdens on NGOs as discussed below. As Adilet have said the sections on ‘moral values’ have been watered down but the revised draft still contains Article 10.4 which states that ‘In order to protect the younger generation, events that contradict moral and ethical values, the public consciousness of the people of the Kyrgyz Republic may be limited by law.’ Those involved with the Constitutional Convention have suggested that this revised wording echoes Western constitutional provisions on protecting children from things like pornography.[84] However similarly framed commitments in places like Russia have been used to restrict discussion and activism on social and cultural issues including LGBTQ and women’s rights, as well as to censor art or content some find in conflict with ‘traditional’ values on the basis that children might view such content, even when they are not target audience. With President Japarov confirming his intention to put the new constitution to the vote on the same day as the local elections, on April 11th 2021, there is limited time for civil society to press for further changes.[85] For now President Japarov is unchallenged at the top of Kyrgyzstan’s political hierarchy and is busily reshaping the system in his image. However Kyrgyzstan still faces huge economic, social and public health challenges and the pressure is now on for him to deliver on his promises. He has faced widespread international scepticism around his assent to power, which hampered relations with Russia, China, the West and international institutions prior to his election. In part to reassure foreign investors and donors he has already rowed back on some elements of his economic nationalism, conscious of the need for international support to help the country move out of its current predicament. This has included distancing himself from calls to nationalise Kumtor, the issue that raised him to prominence (and prison), though a medium term review of the mine’s taxation arrangements to ensure the Canadian company pays more into the Kyrgyz treasury would seem very likely.[86] Japarov has repeatedly said that no new mining contracts will be given to international companies, but that existing contracts would not be impacted, raising questions about how local businesses will gain the relevant technical knowhow to fill this gap in a crucial export sector for Kyrgyzstan.[87] However on February 24th, Turkey and Kyrgyzstan announced a new framework agreement to draw a line for enhanced cooperation in the field of mining, Energy and Natural Resources, which raises questions over these previous assurances.[88] Given that anti-elite economic nationalism has been core to his personal political brand this new caution carries real political risks for him and leaves open the question of whether his populist focus will shift to new targets. As Aksana Ismailbekova points out ethnic nationalism has not been a central feature of his politics (despite the Bakiyev links), however given the broader cultural and conservativism of many of his online supporters, and the ethnic nationalism and religiosity of some of them, there is concern that minority groups may come under increasing pressure if things do not start to go well. The analogy between President Japarov and Trump has been often made. As Georgy Mamedov puts it they share an understanding of ‘politics as confrontation’ and indeed Japarov has used some similar rhetoric including “the country has become mired in a swamp because of the interests of a narrow group of people” (though he has tried to distance himself from being described as populist).[89] His passion for a strong Presidency, which long predates his holding of the role, is part of a desire to see state consolidation after years of fragmentation, bureaucratic inefficiency and chaos, has clear echoes of the way in which Putin sought to strengthen the state to provide legitimacy for his rule. How we got here: The systemic challengesIt is perhaps stating the obvious that Kyrgyzstan finds itself where it is today because what came before clearly was not working for far too many people. To some extent the international communities desire to praise and encourage Kyrgyzstan’s comparative openness, in contrast to the often horrendous regional picture, has perhaps led some to downplay or overlook the deep structural problems that have faced the country for some time. This is not only due to the perhaps understandable desire for a good news story but that the country’s comparative freedom has made it a regional hub for many organisations, something that may add to an unwillingness to rock the boat.  However, the is a need for some reflection that the often poor outcomes that ‘democracy’ was providing for ordinary citizens in ‘Central Asia’s only democracy’ has weakened some of democracy’s attractiveness and undermined faith in liberal institution building amongst Kyrgyzstanis (and some others in region who comment on the ‘chaos’) . As Asel Doolotkeldieva, Jasmine Cameron and others note in their contributions, the country’s elites have failed time and time again to learn the lessons of previous revolutions.[90] Shirin Aitmatova and others have also pointed out many of the formal institutions that have been established in Kyrgyzstan since the collapse of the Soviet Union have too often been a something of a façade, beneath the surface of which true power lies and rents are sought and distributed. This is despite, and in some cases the result of, billions of pounds in international assistance.[91] In 2017 it was estimated that Kyrgyzstan had received over nine billion USD in loans and grants (of which over $2.5 billion had been given as grants), compared to a pre-COVID overall annual GDP of around $8.5 billion.[92] Since the collapse of the Soviet Union successive leaders have followed the orthodox (neo-liberal) policy prescriptions proposed by the international financial institutions that replaced a sclerotic and controlling state, with a hollowed out one, captured by politically connected players that can benefit from it (including through the divestment and privatisation of state assets). The weakness of state institutions has been mirrored by the fluidity of its political party system where political groupings are little more than loose affiliations, led by individual personalities, with limited ideological coherence (though sometimes with shared approaches to broad themes such as nationalism, liberalism, pro-Russia or to specific policies such as a preference for a presidential or Parliamentary system). In too many cases the parties’ primary function can be best conceived as a sorting mechanism for oligarchic interests and societal networks.[93] A recurring theme is that to win a top position on the party list can cost between $500,000 and one million in bribes, with the roles opening up both new opportunities for illicit earnings and providing immunity from prosecution.[94] Whatever the many legitimate concerns about the consolidation of power under the return to the strong Presidential system it is clear that the previous Parliamentary system was failing to deliver its intendent results and was doing little to hold those in power to account. Corruption and organised crimeAs set out clearly above, in many of the essays in this collection and much of the informed coverage of Kyrgyzstan it is clear that corruption is at the root of so many of the challenges that the country faces. Kyrgyzstan lacks the scale of natural resource wealth that fuels much of the grand corruption elsewhere in the region but nevertheless the problem is endemic, entwined with structures of power from the local level to the elite. Kyrgyzstan’s location is an important part of problem. It acts as a key entry point for goods coming into the Eurasian Economic Union’s customs union comprising Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Armenia and Kyrgyzstan. The transport of goods into the customs area, particularly from China (‘the Northern Route’ starting in Kashgar in north western China via the Torugart Pass into Kyrgyzstan and then on to Russia and Kazakhstan), creates significant opportunities for graft and informal monopolies by powerful players. Illicit earnings can be generated through the payment of bribes to pass through formal customs checkpoints, opportunities for smuggling and contraband where such formal procedures are ignored, and through the abuse of the power to allow goods into the country being used to dominate the transport and logistics sectors involved in bringing items across the border.[95] The second dimension to this is Kyrgyzstan’s position on what is also separately called the ‘Northern Route’ towards Russia and Europe, making it an important waystation for the smuggling of narcotics, most notably heroin from Afghanistan via Tajikistan.[96] As Shirin Aitmatova notes in her contribution the overall size of the shadow economy in Kyrgyzstan is enormous, with the most recent projection she quotes as being 42 per cent of GDP.[97] The powerful forces alleged by journalists and international officials to be dominating these two sources of illicit funds respectively are Raiymbek Matraimov (customs) and Kamchybek Kolbayev (drugs). Matraimov had worked his way through the ranks of the customs department in the southern region of Kyrgyzstan, becoming its deputy head and then the head of customs in Osh in 2007 before being made head of customs across the South in 2013. In 2015 he was made deputy head of the national customs service, by which point however he had already acquired the nickname ‘Raiym million’ in recognition of the allegations of illicit earnings.[98] Although he was fired by President Atambayev shortly before the end of his term of office in 2017, Matraimov’s brother had already secured a Parliamentary seat in the then dominant SDKP and the family would ultimately found the Mekenim Kırgızstan party as described above. Although the significant wealth and influence of a (mostly) mid-ranking customs official was widely understood in Kyrgyzstan it was investigative journalism by Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL), the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP), and its Kyrgyz member center Kloop, which brought Matraimov to the centre of political debate in the country.[99] Their reporting initially centred on the Matraimov’s close connections to Khabibula Abdukadyr, an ethnic Uighur with a Kazakhstani passport based in Dubai but with major property holdings in London, Washington DC and Germany, who the investigative team argue is at the centre of a Central Asian cargo smuggling empire.[100] The investigation was made possible by the revelations of Aierken Saimaiti who claimed he acted as a middle man and money launderer, transferring $700 million over five years on behalf of these networks.[101] Saimaiti’s revelations included transfers of almost $2.4 to the Matraimov’s family foundation and information relating to alleged collaboration between the Matraimov’s and Abdukadyr over a Dubai property development. Saimaiti was murdered in a contract killing in Istanbul shortly before the publication of the expose. The reporting sparked anti-corruption protests in Bishkek and the UMUT 2020 movement led by Shirin Aitmatova who writes in this publication.[102] The controversy reared its head again, shortly before the October 2020 elections at which Matraimov’s Mekenim Kırgızstan was closely challenging for first place, with more RFE/RL, OCCRP, Bellingcat and Kloop reporting centred on Matraimov, entitled the Matraimov Kingdom.[103] The reporting documented the mechanisms through which they argue that Matraimov built his business. A significant proportion of the investigation was made possible by Matraimov’s wife Amanda Turgunova flaunting her jet setting lifestyle and lavish spending on social media.[104] The reporting caused further outrage and helped fuel the further anger at the vote buying, by the Matraimov’s Mekenim Kırgızstan and others, in the October 4th election that led to the overthrow of President Jeenbekov.[105] In the immediate aftermath of the elections and Japarov’s rise to power much show was made of investigations into Matraimov by the new authorities, with allegations that he was part of a wider scheme to attract ‘shadow revenues of up to £$700 million from the customs system’.[106] To that end Matraimov was arrested on October 20th and charged with having personally benefited by around two billion som ($23.6 million). However, as noted above, the approach taken by Japarov and his new chairman of the State Committee for National Security Kamchybek Tashiev was to encourage an economic amnesty whereby those who had benefited from past corruption were encouraged to return some of their ill-gotten gains in return for avoiding serious criminal penalties for their crimes. This provided a quick injection of cash into the public coffers and showed immediate ‘results’, whilst avoiding asking too many difficult questions or unsettling the delicate balance of power that was emerging. Of the two billion som ($23.6 million) that Matraimov agreed to return, 600 million som was provided in the form of a shopping mall and nine apartments in Bishkek. He ultimately pled guilty and accepted an additional $3,000 fine (in addition to the $23.6 million returned) and a three year ban from holding public office from February 2020.[107] Unsurprisingly this was seen by many in Kyrgyzstan as merely a slap on the wrist and the public outcry led to renewed protests.[108] In something of a surprise plot twist, at time of writing, Matraimov was rearrested by the GKND, less than a week after his previous trial on further allegations of money laundering and has been detained for two months on pre-trial detention.[109] Irrespective of his legal troubles in Kyrgyzstan, Matraimov and his wife has been subject to US Magnitsky Sanctions on the grounds of corruption since December 2020.[110] Kamchybek ‘Kamchy’ Kolbayev has had a less direct impact on Kyrgyz politics but remains designated as a ‘significant foreign narcotics trafficker’ under the US Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act since 2011 and under an asset freeze by the US Treasury Department since in February 2012.[111] Kolbayev was subsequently extradited in December 2012 from the United Arab Emirates back to Kyrgyzstan where he was initially jailed for five and a half years, subsequently reduced to three years before being released in May 2014 on the grounds of time served. Charges of leading an organised criminal group were also dropped at the time.[112] The investigation by RFE/RL, OCCRP, Kloop, and Bellingcat into the Matraimovs also showed the links between Kolbayev and the Matraimovs, with the latter family staying at a villa believed to be owned by the former in Lake Issyk-Kul.[113] Kolbayev was detained as part of the much publicised anti-corruption push by Japarov and Tashiev in October 2020, but it remains unclear if action will be taken against him.[114] These larger players sit atop an engrained culture of graft, as documented by Aksana Ismailbekova in her essay, which runs through both the criminal class and throughout the operation of the state. Business people have to adapt to a symbiotic relationship with the Government and criminal networks from the local to the national level through the paying of bribes in return for protection harassment (both official and informal) and for economic opportunities. Figures from Kolbayev and Matraimov all the way down to local politicians and officials run their own personal patronage and client networks. The big players effectively provide their own social welfare schemes that are able to step in where the state has failed. For example Matraimov’s family foundation has a considerable presence in the Kara-Suu running social programmes and funding students to go to University in Osh.[115] As Erica Marat noted, Kolbayev stepped into provided supplies and support in his native Issyk-Kul during the pandemic when support from the state collapsed.[116] At a local level, notably still in Osh and its surrounding areas, sports clubs and gyms act to supply local muscle (sportsmeni) that can act on behalf of the particular patron which funds them. These young men can be deployed to act as election observers on behalf of political parties and manage vote buying schemes on the ground on behalf of the party supported by their patron. As set out above President after President have used the power of their office to line their own pockets. A 2016 study by Sarah Chayes of the Carnegie Endowment, sets out the dominant position the President (at the time Atambayev) has over other kleptocratic networks in the country, through his control of law enforcement and the courts.[117] Faced with such an unpromising environment, it is little surprise that Western backed efforts at institutional reform to tackle corruption have struggled to gain deep purchase. Kyrgyzstan is currently part of the Open Government Partnership, the global organisation which works with governments to improve transparency and accountability, but despite some limited progress in improving access to information in some ministries and a useful but underused eProcurement system under Jeenbekov the Government prioritised the PR benefits of membership of the scheme, and of similar Governmental reform projects supported international donors, over meaningful reform.[118] According to Aksana Ismailbekova, President Japarov has promised he would eliminate the system of ‘dolya’ (shares of business profits ‘given’ to state authorities) and as mentioned above the economic amnesty returned some funds to the state in a light shakedown upon the new leadership’s arrival in October. However as Ismailbekova points out not everybody who supports Japarov because they believe he will take action on corruption does so because they actually believe he will rid the country of corruption. Particularly away from Bishkek the perception in some quarters may be that Japarov, as an economic populist, will manage the engrained processes of corruption with the public’s interests more clearly in mind than his predecessors with action taken against egregious excesses. It is in this context the limited return of funds and slap on the wrists administered under the amnesty need not be fatal blow to Japarov’s support if he is clearly seen to take meaningful action to the petty corruption by local officials and police and the actions of organised crime that blights the lives of ordinary citizens. Such a shift would make it easier to maintain the type of grand corruption practiced behind closed doors (if it can be kept away from social media by its practitioners) that entrenches the structure of power. On potential example of this approach might be the recent arrest of alleged organised crime boss Kadyrbek Dosonov whose large properties were filmed and publicised by the State Committee for National Security.[119] Nationalism, traditionalism, rights and religion  Alongside the rising corruption, nationalism and related populist socially conservative and traditionalist movements have been some of the key factors in the evolution of Kyrgyz politics. During and after the collapse of the Soviet Union the process of what it means to be a citizen of Kyrgyzstan has been evolving. While the Kyrgyz had been distinct ethnic group, Kyrgyzstan as such did not exist before its absorption into the Russian and Soviet empires and the territory of the country encompassed significant numbers of ethnic minority groups, most notably the Uzbek community in southern Kyrgyzstan and Russians who had moved there in Imperial and Soviet times.[120] Despite President Akayev’s ‘Kyrgyzstan is our common home’ approach he and subsequent politicians would seek to grow, shape and channel ethnic Kyrgyz nationalism to their political ends.[121] Tensions between the ethnic Kyrgyz (a dominant presence in the state structures of southern Kyrgyzstan) and ethnic Uzbeks (dominant in the private sector economy of the south until the events below) manifested in two major riots in and around Osh in 1990 (which would see over 300 killed in a dispute over control of a collective farm) and in 2010 (where the death toll remains unclear but is likely to be between 426, the figure given by the internationally criticised National Commission of local experts and upper estimates of several thousand).[122] The 2010 violence was sparked following the ouster of President Bakiyev, who had returned to his political stronghold amongst the ethnic Kyrgyz in southern Kyrgyzstan. The evolving debate at the time over the country’s political future saw ethnic Uzbeks make demands for greater political representation and the ethnic Kyrgyz reiterated calls for land reform and in some cases for the expulsion of Uzbeks to redistribute their land to poor Kyrgyz.[123] Tensions escalated between April and early June before exploding into riots that peaked on May 19th in Jalal-Abad and most notably on the 9th and 10th of June 2010 in Osh. In the wake of the riots, in addition to the locally led inquiry, an Independent International Commission of Inquiry into the Events in Southern Kyrgyzstan (Kyrgyzstan Inquiry Commission- KIC) was established after the President Otunbayeva invited Dr. Kimmo Kiljunen, Special Representative for Central Asia of the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly, to lead it.[124] The KIC found that in addition to the injuries and deaths, a figure it put at 470 (the majority of which were ethnic Uzbeks) though it suggested this could grow, it noted that around 111,000 Kyrgyzstani Uzbeks had been displaced to Uzbekistan and around 300,000 had been internally displaced within Kyrgyzstan. However, the Kyrgyz Parliament rejected the Commission’s findings on the grounds of, in their view, a pro-Uzbek bias and declared Kiljunen persona non-grata. As Eric McGlinchey ruefully notes in his essay ‘no Kyrgyz leader has sought to challenge (former Osh Mayor) Myrzakmatov’s—or any other Kyrgyz nationalist’s—one-sided narrative of the 2010 ethnic violence. To challenge this narrative would be political suicide. Thus, it is perhaps not surprising that, to this day, no Kyrgyz executive has sought to reverse the Kyrgyz judiciary’s gross miscarriage of justice conducted against ethnic Uzbeks in the aftermath of the 2010 riots.’ In the years that followed the violence the ethnic Kyrgyz community has expanded its role in the local economy of the south as long desired. The Uzbek population have had to resort to defensive approaches, noted in Ismailbekova’s essay, to limit the risk of further violence or political pressure, this has included ensuring they support the likely winners of elections and there has also been significant migration of the community to Russia and Uzbekistan. Efforts to promote a civic (non-ethnic) Kyrgyzstani identity that could encompass both Kyrgyz and Uzbeks have foundered in the intervening years amid the rising tide of nationalism. However, as noted at the start of the publication, the growing manifestations of Kyrgyz nationalism over the last ten or so years have often not been focused on the domestic Uzbek minority but on challenging Western values, worrying about growing Chinese influence (as mentioned earlier) and on promoting the Kyrgyz language. Language is a growing dimension of the debate over Kyrgyz identity with a marked divide between an urban population, particularly in Bishkek that was educated in and predominantly uses Russian, rather than Kyrgyz and a rural population that may have limited or non-existent Russian.[125] So the promotion of the Kyrgyz language and literature is part of not only a nation building project, but a class and regional divide with Kyrgyz still holding connotations of backwardness in some Russian speaking quarters. In the current constitution Kyrgyz is currently the ‘state’ language, with Russian also designated as an ‘official language’. There had been some suggestions that Russian’s official status should be removed as part of the new Constitution but so far these have been resisted in the February 2021 draft, not least with Moscow watching developments.[126] Growing hostility to ‘Western values’ has perhaps been the strongest driver of Kyrgyz nationalism in recent years. As in many countries this has focused on issues relating to women’s rights and LGBTQ rights, echoing narratives promoted in Russian propaganda, but with clear local roots in the evolving debate around ‘traditional’ Kyrgyz values and national identity.[127] Internationally backed efforts to tackle issues such as bride kidnapping (ala kachuu), abuse of daughters-in-law forced to work in the husband’s parents’ home (kelinism) and domestic violence are seen through a nationalist prism and a traditionalist conception of Kyrgyz manhood and a patriarchal construction of family life.[128] Reported cases of domestic violence have increased by 400 per cent since 2011.[129] The country lacks meaningful anti-discrimination laws or protections against hate speech, with a reliance on Article 16 in the current constitution as the basis for local practice.[130] Despite strong social pressures for ‘traditional’ gender roles women play a somewhat greater role in Kyrgyzstan’s political class than in many of its Central Asian neighbours, with a 30 per cent gender quota on party lists which led to 23 women MPs in the current (2015-2020) Supreme Council.[131] As noted above Otunbayeva was a leading political figure in the 00s and served as acting President, though only two of the 16 members of Japarov’s new cabinet are women, Minister of Justice Asel Chinbayeva and Minister of Transportation, Architecture, Construction and Communication Gulmira Abdralieva. Similarly the limited efforts that have been made to try to protect LGBTQ people in Kyrgyzstan, through the work of supportive NGOs like Labrys, or including limited LGBTQ references such as demands for ‘equality for all’ or carrying rainbow flags at the 2019 International Women’s day march engendered significant political push back from nationalist groups and Parliamentarians such as Jyldyz Musabekova.[132] She wrote on Facebook that “the men who do not want to have children and the girls who do not want to pour tea...must not only be cursed, they must be beaten…We have to beat the craziness out of them, are there any decent guys out there [willing to do that]?" and later warned that "if we sit silently...Kyrgyzstan will become a ‘Gayistan.’" Such attitudes are common place amongst wider society and violence is widespread against members of the small LGBTQ community who are no longer able to meet publically since the closure of the last open LGBTQ venue, called London, in 2017.[133] Police are known not to take action against perpetrators of violence against the community and indeed are often alleged to demand bribes to avoid informing the victims’ family that they are gay. The current and revised draft constitution both define marriage as being between a man and a woman, something that was brought in through a referendum in 2016 to act as a ban against the future possibility of same sex marriage.[134] According to the 2017-19 World Values survey, 73 per cent of citizens of Kyrgyzstan said that they would not want a homosexual neighbour and 83 per cent said that it was never justifiable to be homosexual (with only 1.3 per cent saying it was always justifiable).[135] Such engrained public attitudes make efforts to protect LGBTQ rights a hugely difficult challenge for NGOs and the international community and an easy target for nationalist groups, such as the vigilante organisation Kyrk Choro (Forty Knights), to whip up public anger.[136] While much of Kyrgyzstan’s social conservativism is rooted in traditionalism and nationalism, these attitudes are also being bolstered by its increasing religiosity, something that has happened in a more open way than elsewhere in Central Asia. Like the rest of the region during the Soviet period religion was heavily regulated by the SADUM (Spiritual Administration of the Muslims of Central Asia) and that supervision has continued in the form of the Spiritual Directorate of Muslims of Kyrgyzstan (SAMK). Despite the continuation of top-down control over official religion the nature of Islam is evolving through increased contact with the wider Muslim Ummah and investment by Arab, Pakistani and Turkish foundations not only in Mosque building (the number of mosques has gone from 39 in 1990 to 2,600 in 2019), but in religiously inspired social projects such as the provision of schools and access to water.[137] As a result the transition is underway from a more cultural form of Islamic identity based around tradition and family, with prayers only before dinner to a more observant one. The hijab is more openly worn than elsewhere in Central Asia but a de facto ban remains on its use in schools though the ubiquitous use of school uniform policy.[138] Rules against ‘aggressive proselytisation’ are only really applied in practice against Protestant and minority Muslim groups, particularly those who are not officially registered with the State Committee on Religious Affairs (SCRA).[139] During the 2020/21 constitutional redrafting process there was a debate about whether to remove the requirements that the state be ‘secular’ (Article 1), with pressure for change from the religious community and a potential conflation between secularism and soviet-style atheism in the public mind.[140] However, as of the February 2021 draft, the designation of the state as secular has remained in Article 1. So the forces of nationalism and social conservatism have been growing in strength and putting liberal social movements under increasing pressure. Most Kyrgyz Presidents have courted the nationalist vote to some extent but Japarov’s political persona is that of a populist nationalist. So far however, despite the fairly standard expressions of social conservatism, his political pitch has been one of economic nationalism, based on his record in the Kumtor mine nationalisation campaign, and anti-elitist populism. However with the President already having to row back on nationalisation under pressure from international investors at a time of economic fragility, including the Chinese who are keeping a watchful eye on further bouts of sinophobia, this leaves a significant risk that the focus of his administration’s populist ire may fall on issues facing women and the LGBTQ community or the liberal, pro-Western NGOs that work on them. Civil societyDespite the significant challenges listed above and below for now Kyrgyzstan remains a regional hub for civil society activity, both organisations that are active in Kyrgyzstan and those that operate across the rest of Central Asia. However it is clear that civil society in Kyrgyzstan has been under sustained pressure for several years and perhaps the worse situation elsewhere in the region has acted as a barrier to some international observers engaging fully with the depth of the problem the country faces. Local NGOs were in a reasonably strong position in the 2000s and their alumni were seen to play an active part in the 2005 and 2010 protests and their aftermath, something that gave even the politicians who were beneficiaries of the change they campaigned for cause to pause. In 2011 NGO’s were significantly more trusted than the state, with 77 per cent of respondents in a poll believing they acted for the benefit of social development and 62 per cent of respondents not trusting the Government to do the same thing.[141] However, they have been subject to a sustained campaign of de-legitimation and pressure over the last ten years, with Ernest Zhanaev’s essay noting a particular increase since 2014. As has already been documented civil society has faced several attempts to add to the bureaucratic burdens they face, most notably the 2016 attempts to replicated the Russian Foreign Agents law and the attempts in 2019-2020 that would add significant new reporting requirements about details of their income and made it harder to recruit temporary staff.[142] Local NGO activists also report increasing pressure from the security services, including people being questioned by security officials and put under surveillance by both official methods and by unknown actors. Despite these pressures many civil society activists have been able to do vital work raising awareness of human rights abuses and exerting pressure that has been able to curb some of the worst excesses of the system, at least until now. These direct actions are set in the wider context of sustained efforts at de-legitimation from nationalist groups and hidden sources using popup media outlets or social media campaigns of unknown origin, with concerns from activists about the potential involvement of the security services (Kyrgyz and, some claim, Russian). Russia does certainly play a part in promoting region wide narratives against NGOs that feed off and amplify local concerns. As noted above efforts NGOs working on women’s rights and LGBTQ issues, areas where activists face huge challenges in engaging entrenched conservative public opinion, have been weaponised by their opponents who argue the sector’s interests are more aligned with Western interests rather than local people. This perception helps to amplify the second charge, that of ‘grant eating’, with NGO’s being portrayed as only being interested in what they can raise donor money for rather than being focused on local priorities, a narrative which fuels further pressure on public reporting requirements. Kyrgyzstan’s Supreme Council has also recently revived a draft law ‘on Trade unions’ that seeks to increase the regulation of trade union activity by forcing all regional and sectoral trade unions to join the Federation of Trade Unions of Kyrgyzstan, which would become the only national-level union body recognised by the Government.[143] This follows a politically charge fight for control of the Federation where the politically connected former General Secretary was removed from office and other union officials and activists were subjected to a campaign of harassment by the Government, including 50 criminal cases, according to the Central Asia Labour Rights Monitoring Mission and Human Rights Watch. The Federation was barred from holding its annual congress in late 2020 to elect his successor.[144] Amid the deluge of bad faith accusations pointed at Kyrgyzstan’s civil society, it is tempting for the international community to take a purely defensive posture, circling the wagons in an attempt to keep on going and using diplomatic pressure to fight back against negative narratives being promoted by political figures. While it is right and necessary to continue to push back against these political pressures, after the third revolution in 15 years, it is clearly also time for a rethink on strategy. Many essay contributors put forward ideas in this collection about how they believe donor priorities and operations might evolve in the current climate. Asel Doolotkeldieva has previously argued for the need for reconsider the depth of civil society impact in political areas given the relatively limited impact they have been able to have in the evolution of recent events, saying that a few ‘brave activists’ are not enough and calling for a greater focus on economic equality projects over democratisation in the short-term.[145] Doolotkeldieva’s contribution in this publication expands on her theme to suggest new ways of working. In her contribution, Shirin Aitmatova is blunt about her views on the need for change in Kyrgyzstan’s NGO sector, arguing for fresh voices, new thinking from donors and greater creativity in funding mechanisms. There will need to be further efforts to address long-standing questions of local accountability, with some donors perhaps needing to give partners the space to respond flexibly to local concerns as well as their strategic priorities.[146] They will also need to think about how they can most suitably engage with newly emerging groups of activists. From the volunteers who helped in the COVID response to the druzhinniki who protected businesses from potential rioting to the Bashtan Bashta (‘Start with your head’) protest movement, which in recent months has organised creative campaigns against elements of the proposed constitution, there are new social movements that are developing, often coordinated through social media rather than existing institutions, which show an enduring appetite for civic and social activism.[147] Media and online freedomsWith respect to media and online freedoms again Kyrgyzstan’s relative freedom compared to the regional average can sometimes mask some of the deep structural challenges it faces. State television continues to draw the biggest media audience, closely followed by Russian domestic channels, and television overall still provides the primary source of news and entertainment in rural areas, while in the cities where internet penetration is higher online outlets are rapidly growing to outpace traditional media. Some of the biggest challenges the sector faces are the local example of the problem facing journalism the world over around making independent media profitable in the context of growing dominance of online advertising (and its capture by social media and search providers) and the weak state of the local economy. Questions of media ownership and funding are the main source of censorship and journalistic self-censorship. The difficult media economy exacerbates the extent to which many outlets operate a ‘pay to play’ model where articles and editorial outlook are shaped by those able to fund them.[148] This not a situation unique to Kyrgyzstan but it manifests itself in everything, from direct influence of coverage by local business and political elites through to relying on produce placement and sponsorship which can limit independence. The latter includes partnerships with international agencies such as UNICEF to increase awareness of their activities, which is clearly preferable to other available funding sources that have been claimed to influence coverage. International support (from donors and social media companies) may be needed to help local outlets identify and generate new sources of income, including support to make their entertainment and lifestyle output more attractive to help draw audiences that stay to read the news. While more training for the sake of holding training should be avoided, there remain skills gaps, particularly in the Kyrgyz language sector and in local journalism. International partners perhaps can provide further assistance in helping local outlets package international news for a Kyrgyz audience. As with NGOs the growing pressure on independent media is not only financial but has come from politicians, the security services and shadowy forces linked to the wealthy and powerful. COVID provided an opportunity for politicians to try to introduce a new ‘Law on Manipulating Information’.[149] A previous version of the bill was blocked by President Jeenbekov in July 2020 and referred back to Parliament for revisions, however following the change of Government Parliamentarians have confirmed their intention to bring back this legislation.[150] Ostensibly drafted to address misinformation being circulated in the wake of the pandemic, its framing is seen as too broad and overly vague by international observers. The obvious concerns about abuse of such legislation has been amplified by the ways existing laws were abused by the security services during the pandemic against those criticising the government response as noted earlier.[151] Journalists were also targeted, physically and online, for their reporting on potential electoral irregularities in the October 2020 election.[152] As Eric McGlinchey notes in his essay, President Japarov has pledged that ‘freedom of speech and the media will continue to be an inviolable value’, however, his post-election victory speech added a chilling caveat to that commitment, saying “while I will defend the media, I ask you not to distort my words or the words of politicians and officials, not to take our statements out of context. Do this and there won’t be any prosecutions.”[153] Radio Azattyk, RFE/RL’s local station, and a major source of radio and online news in the country has been targeted publically by politicians in attempts at delimitation and its journalists have faced pressure from security services and potentially from the subjects of their investigations.[154] President Japarov has publically criticised Azattyk over coverage of allegations they published around possible links to those involved in organised crime.[155] It will be important for the Biden Administration, as part of its new relationship with the Japarov administration and as part of its wider reset of post-Trump RFE/RL strategy to actively defend the political space for RFE/RL and safety of its journalists. At the moment the BBC’s Kyrgyz service is not seen by local observers as a particularly significant player in the local media market and the BBC should consider ways in which this might change, including new content partnerships with local outlets. Online trolling has become an increasing source of pressure on journalists (and NGO activists). Such trolling has two notable sources. Firstly, there are organised troll factory operations, though not at the industrial scale of their Russian equivalents they provide a paid presence that is used to harass and challenge journalists. Investigative reporting, published by openDemocracy, has shown the existence of operations that work on behalf of whoever is will to pay, some with alleged links to the Matraimovs that have been used to target journalists from Kloop, Azattyk and other independent outlets.[156] These networks have also been used to assist political campaigns, operating in support of Mekenim Kırgızstan ahead of the October elections and then Japarov and his campaign for constitutional changes in the post-election period and in the January 2021 Presidential poll.[157] Secondly, the growing power of nationalist groups and Japarov’s genuine support in populist and nationalist online communities. As with populists in other country contexts this has led to the growth of organic, free range trolls, who can supplement and amplify the work of paid trolls in such a way, which may in time reduce the need for expensive and intensive troll farming. The essays in this collection by Gulzat Baialieva and Joldon Kutmanaliev, Begaim Usenova and ARTICLE 19, and by Dr. Elira Turdubaeva explore the emerging online movements and trolling campaigns, notably in the Kyrgyz language sections of media where much of this harassment is situated.[158] Facebook, which provides three of the most used social media and messaging services in Kyrgyzstan (Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp), looks after the Central Asia region including Kyrgyzstan as part of its Asia Pacific public policy team’s coverage. The public policy team also gets support from the company’s community operation team (which does the content moderation work), legal, and other teams for Facebook’s work in Central Asia. Facebook’s community operation also relies heavily on machine learning. Outside Facebook, the company is also understood to have expert ‘trusted partners’.[159] Given the nature of machine learning, which could result in mistakes or ignore certain issues due partly to lack of understanding in local culture and nuances by the AI, it will be important that Facebook looks at ways to expand its Kyrgyz language capabilities and add more Kyrgyz speaking human reviewers for content moderation, particularly around potential flashpoints such as elections and constitutional referendums, and to look at ways to provide quicker and easier access to human led review processes for journalists and activists facing organised harassment efforts. Rule of lawAs with so much in Kyrgyzstan’s public life the operation of the legal system is significantly undermined by endemic corruption and deference to those in power, a topic addressed in Jasmine Cameron’s essay in this collection which highlights the debilitating effect this has on the rule of law. It is clear that the Prosecutor General’s office, police and the judiciary operate under considerable political influence of whoever is in power at the time, from the Presidential Administration right on down to local power brokers. In cases where a clear political direction is not set from the top, further opportunities arise for lower level corruption. Local NGOs, such as the legal clinic Adilet, note that official oversight and disciplinary mechanisms for prosecutors and judges are ineffective, particularly in cases where officials are following orders, creating a culture of impunity.[160] Corruption and political favouritism is seen as impacting both who is selected for judicial training through the Higher school of Justice and who is selected by the Council for the Selection of Judges, two thirds of the whom are made up of political appointees (albeit notionally split between the Parliamentary majority and opposition). Reform of judicial selection is included in the February 2021 draft Constitution, which states that ‘the Council for Justice Affairs (will be) formed from the number of judges who make up at least two thirds of its composition, one third are representatives of the President, the Jogorku Kenesh, the People's Kurultai and the legal community’.[161] This change could potentially be helpful in the long-term to increase the formal distance between the judiciary and politicians, but will do little to change the existing pool of judges and their connections who may still perpetuate the current legal culture absent additional measures to tackle corruption and political direction. As potentially less helpful proposed constitutional change is the proposal to further increase the power of the Prosecutors office by giving them ‘the right to conduct inspections of citizens, commercial organisations, other economic entities, non-governmental, non-commercial organisations, institutions, enterprises, etc.’, which Adilet explain would ‘largely duplicate the activities of other state and law enforcement agencies, primarily the State Committee for National Security for Combating Corruption’ opening up the possibility for all such responsibilities to be centralised in one all-powerful prosecution service as in Soviet times.[162] While such a change may reduce opportunities for different agencies to be used in intra-regime spats it would hand prosecutors an even broader range of tools to apply pressure improper pressure if not handled with extreme caution and the kind of strong safeguards that have not often been applied in the past in Kyrgyzstan. Cameron notes that 61 per cent of people who have had contact with the police in the last year reported having to pay a bribe and exposes the lack of oversight and enforcement of anti-corruption. Several authors in this collection give examples of particular extortion by police of vulnerable communities, including Uzbek business people and the LGBTQ community. As Cameron points out, the combination of corruption and abuse of power creates a legal culture where citizens do not have trust in the legal process, so resort to other methods of trying to resolve their problems including violence in the court room against the opposing party, lawyers and court officials. More work needs to be done to improve the status of defence lawyers, including ensuring that they are present during the questioning of suspects, vis-à-vis the powerful Prosecutors operating under the aegis of the Prosecutor General’s Office.[163] Efforts are also underway to encourage the use of cameras in the court room to try to promote transparency and accountability, while international organisations such as the ABA and Clooney Foundation’s Trial Watch are attempting to provide official observers to monitor trial conditions in contentious cases.[164] However, as a number of different experts have noted, international investment in rule of law reform in Kyrgyzstan, including 38 million euros from the EU between 2014-2020, has so far generated limited results, particularly in controversial cases.[165] In a country where domestic violence is believed to be endemic Cameron notes that in 2019 there were only 9,000 cases of domestic violence recorded. ‘Of those, approximately 5,456 cases were registered with the authorities as administrative cases, and only around 784 were registered as criminal’, which seems indicative of lack of trust in the system as well as wider cultural barriers.[166] The United Nations Human Rights Committee, the expert body that reviews legal cases and other alleged abuses against individuals that relate to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) has played an important external role in requesting the review of controversial human rights cases, 25 in all including the case of Azimjan Askarov noted below.[167] However, efforts are underway in Kyrgyzstan to end the requirement for the local review of cases criticised by international legal bodies, reacting to international pressure over Askarov and echoing narratives deployed against international judicial scrutiny by Russia, the UK and USA amongst others.[168] 

Azimjan Askarov

By Aydar Sydykov

Azimjan Askarov was a well-known human rights defender and journalist in the Kyrgyz Republic. He was recognised as a prisoner of conscience by Amnesty International and received international awards, including the CPJ International Press Freedom Award.[1] In 1996, he became involved in the protection of human rights, and in 2002 he established an NGO called Vozdukh to investigate and document human rights violations by the local police and penitentiary/detention facilities. In 2010 Askarov was accused by local officials of participating and organising mass riots, inciting ethnic hatred and killing a police officer during the June clashes between Kyrgyz and Uzbeks in Bazar-Korgon (in the Jalal-Abad region) and was sentenced to life imprisonment. In the view of many human rights organisations, Askarov was convicted for his human rights activism, especially during the 2010 clashes when he documented pogroms, arson and gathered information about the dead and wounded (including civilians who were not involved as participants in the conflict). The investigation was conducted with gross violations of Askarov’s human rights. In detention Askarov was repeatedly subjected to torture, cruel treatment, while the state authorities did not provide access to judicial protection and a fair trial. Despite the fact that Askarov's advocate repeatedly filed complaints about the torture, ill treatment and other violations, on September 15th 2010, Askarov was found guilty of the charges against him and sentenced to life imprisonment. The sentence was upheld by higher courts. All medical documents proving his injuries, facts of torture during detention, including the results of two medical examinations conducted by a foreign medical expert, were consistently ignored by all court instances, prosecutor’s office and other state authorities. After the final judgment of the Supreme Court of the Kyrgyz Republic, Askarov submitted individual complaint to the UN Human Rights Committee, alleging torture, Kyrgyzstan’s failure to provide effective remedies, arbitrary and inhuman detention and the violation of his rights to a fair trial and freedom of expression. In 2016, the UN Human Rights Committee in its decision found violations of Askarov's rights in accordance with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.[1] The Committee decided that Kyrgyzstan has to make full reparation to Askarov; to release him immediately; quash his conviction; and, if necessary, conduct a new trial with guarantees of fair trial. On June 12th 2016, considering the UN Human Rights Committee’s decision as newly discovered facts, the Kyrgyz Supreme Court reversed previous court’s decisions and ordered a new trial to be started in the first instance court. Unfortunately, despite all the evidence submitted by Askarov and the UN judgement the lower courts declined to effectively reconsider the allegations of torture with no action to investigate the allegations of torture and bring its perpetrators to justice. In May 2020 the Supreme Court upheld the decision not to reopen the case passed by the lower courts, leaving the guilty verdict in place with still Askarov incarcerated for life. Sadly on July 25th 2020 Azimjan Askarov died in prison during the COVID-19 pandemic despite his advocate’s statements and international outcry about Askarov’s poor health and the urgent need for medical examination and treatment.

 Human rightsThe Askarov case was, until his tragic death in 2020, one of the most high profile failings of the Kyrgyz judicial system, the country’s most significant case of the persecution of a human rights defender and an enduring symbol of the political paralysis engendered by the failure to equitably resolve the ethnic tensions in the south. Successive political leaders have found themselves beholden to powerful local interests in the south and afraid of sparking further anger amongst the region’s ethnic Kyrgyz population. With the chance to obtain justice, even posthumously, for Askarov within Kyrgyzstan seemingly remote, not least given the court decision to refuse his widow the right to continue the appeals process, focus must turn to what measures can still be taken by the international community.[169] One of the challenges in the case is the seemingly diffuse nature of systemic responsibility for his imprisonment, however, there is clearly a strong argument in favour of the deployment of Magnitsky sanctions by the US, UK, EU and others against officials involved in the case to send a clear message against impunity even if it is unlikely that many of those involved have a significant footprint in any of those jurisdictions. The Askarov case is far from the only example where allegations of torture have been documented For example, in the first half of 2019, there were 171 allegations of torture registered in Kyrgyzstan with the Prosecutor General’s office.[170] Human Rights defenders, whether they be lawyers or NGO representatives routinely experience harassment from the security services and online nationalist trolling.[171] A number of international human rights activists and independent journalists remain banned from entering Kyrgyzstan including Mihra Rittmann from Human Rights Watch, AFP’s Chris Rickleton and Vitaly Ponomarev, the Central Asia director for Russian Human Rights NGO Memorial.[172] Kyrgyzstan also controversially accepted an extradition request from Uzbekistan for journalist Bobomurod Abdullaev, despite concerns over the risk of torture (something Abdullaev had previously experienced at the hands of the Uzbek authorities).[173] International relations and their impact on KyrgyzstanAs a relatively small country with a fragile economy a significant factor in Kyrgyzstan’s stability and success is its relationship to the regional neighbours and international powers. As has been set out above, the country is a member of the Russian-led Eurasian Economic Union, which has helped to further increase economic integration with Russia and Kazakhstan and to some extent improved the coordination of the large numbers of economic migrants it sends to them (predominantly, around 513,000 of which, to Russia).[174] Additionally, Chinese economic interests in the country have been expanding, with some controversy, in recent years and Kyrgyzstan is also part of the Beijing-led Shanghai Cooperation Organisation that focuses on security sector cooperation. Sensitive border and water disputes with Uzbekistan and Tajikistan in the Fergana Valley add to the febrile atmosphere in intercommunal relations with the Uzbek and other minority communities within southern Kyrgyzstan.[175] With economic opportunities relatively scarce, for the most part Western strategic interests have been focused on issues around the drug trade and anti-terrorism concerns since the Manas airbase stopped being used for operations in Afghanistan in 2014. However, as discussed, Kyrgyzstan’s comparative openness by Central Asian standards has made the country the regional hub for Western international aid and activity. Japarov’s sudden rise to power took Kyrgyzstan’s international partners by surprise. In addition to statements of concern by Western states, Putin’s frostiness towards someone who overthrew his predecessor was palpable, including a public snub at a November 10th CIS meeting, though relations have begun to normalise in the wake of President Japarov’s January election.[176] Prior to the electoral upheaval Kyrgyzstan had asked China, which holds around 43 per cent of Kyrgyzstan’s external debt and therefore significant leverage, for COVID-related debt forbearance as Bishkek struggled to manage repayments.[177] Following Japarov’s rise to power, and initial concern amongst the Chinese leadership, Kyrgyzstan has gone out of its way to reassure international investors (particularly Chinese ones) that they have nothing to fear despite the new President’s previous resource nationalism and the anti-Chinese sentiments amongst some of his supporters (though Carnegie’s Temur Umarov argues that Japarov himself has strong family and business backer ties to China).[178] In terms of formal relations with Western partners, the EU-Kyrgyzstan Enhanced Partnership and Cooperation Agreement has yet to be ratified despite being initialled in July 2019, with translation delays blamed but also concerns around potential for issues, such as the human rights situation, impacting European Parliamentary ratification.[179] The UK is currently negotiating a partnership agreement, based on the existing 1999 EU-Kyrgyzstan Partnership and Cooperation Agreement, though the deal is likely to come after the conclusion of other deals with larger economic benefits for the UK (most relevantly and gallingly for Kyrgyzstan the deal with Kazakhstan). The UK could potentially generate good will and some limited leverage by basing the offer in its proposed deal on the 2019 rather than 1999 EU package and offering to speed up its passage in return for taking certain actions to protect human rights and improve governance standards.[180] The EU and its member states have invested 907.69 million euros in aid to Kyrgyzstan between 2007 and 2020 (of which the Commission has been the largest donor at €391.3 million, followed by Germany at €349.69 million).[181] The most recent round of EU bilateral development cooperation was based around ‘the Multiannual Indicative Programme (MEP) for 2014-2020 with the total budget of €174 million’, which ‘focused on three main sectors: Education (€71.8 million), Rule of Law (€37.8 million) and Integrated Rural Development (€61.8 million)’, which was supplemented by a €36 million emergency COVID relief package in 2020.[182] Until recently, as noted here, Germany has been the largest bilateral donor amongst EU member states, but the Federal Ministry for Economic Development and Cooperation (BMZ) announced in May 2020 that it was pulling out of bilateral development spending in Kyrgyzstan as part of refocusing its efforts elsewhere in the world.[183] The US Aid spend in 2020 was $40.17 million, of which Democracy, Human Rights, and Governance was the largest area of spending ($13.3 million or 33 per cent), followed by Education ($9.07 million 23 per cent), then Economic Development and Health.[184] The UK’s direct aid spend is scheduled to be £7.47 million for the 2020/21 financial year though this figure is scheduled to fall to £5.15 million by 2022/23 in the wake of the overall cut in UK Aid spending from 0.7 per cent to 0.5 per cent of a COVID impacted GDP.[185] The current UK Government priorities are: improving the transparency of public finance management, to tackle corruption and improve outcomes; working with Parliamentarians to improve scrutiny; and improving the regulatory environment for private sector investment. As set out in a number of essay contributions and in the conclusion to this publication there is a strong case for looking again at the extent of progress achieved existing schemes and potentially reconsidering donor priorities in the context of the fragility and opacity of formal institutions and political parties in a system where, until now at least, much of the real decision making power has been found elsewhere. Irrespective of donor priorities around long-term capacity building, the rapidly changing situation on the ground should necessitate a renewed focus on preventing backsliding on Kyrgyzstan’s already tenuous freedoms. Image by Sludge G under (CC). [1] This publication is the first in a series that will comprise Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Kazakhstan.[2] EEAS, EU Annual Report on Human Rights and Democracy in the World 2019 Country Updates,  https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/201007_eu_country_updates_on_human_rights_and_democracy_2019.pdf[3] The precise details of this history are sometimes contested[4] Francisco Olmos, State-building myths in Central Asia, FPC, October 2019, https://fpc.org.uk/state-building-myths-in-central-asia/. The historical existence of Manas is hotly debated but it seems likely that though carried for many years through oral tradition before its transcribing in the 18th Century, its origins are many centuries later than the time it recalls, making Manas a figure seen by scholars as more akin to King Arthur than a historical figure.[5] BBC News Channel, Profile: Askar Akayev, April 2005, http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/4371819.stm[6] Catherine Putz, Kyrgyzstan and Belarus: Congratulations and Notes of Protest, August 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/08/kyrgyzstan-and-belarus-congratulations-and-notes-of-protest/; Peter Leonard, Lukashenko appears alongside “dead” ex-Kyrgyz PM after protests, Eurasianet, August 2020, https://eurasianet.org/lukashenko-appears-alongside-dead-ex-kyrgyz-pm-after-protests; Bermet Talant, Twitter Post, Twitter, August 2020, https://twitter.com/ser_ou_parecer/status/1292758150333059072?s=11[7] OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights, OSCE, October 2017, https://www.osce.org/odihr/elections/kyrgyzstan/333296[8] International Crisis Group, Kyrgyzstan at Ten: Trouble in the ‘”Island of Democracy”, August 2001, https://www.crisisgroup.org/europe-central-asia/central-asia/kyrgyzstan/kyrgyzstan-ten-trouble-island-democracy[9] Otunbayeva was appointed to the post.[10] The World Bank, GDP per capita (current US$) – Kyrgyz Republic, https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.PCAP.CD?locations=KG; The World Bank, Personal remittances, received (% of GDP) – Kyrgyz Republic, https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/BX.TRF.PWKR.DT.GD.ZS?locations=KG[11] Transparency International, Corruption Perceptions Index – 2020, https://www.transparency.org/en/cpi/2020/index/kgz#; Freedom House, Nations in Transit 2020, Kyrgyzstan, https://freedomhouse.org/country/kyrgyzstan/nations-transit/2020; Freedom House, Freedom in the World 2020, Kyrgyzstan, https://freedomhouse.org/country/kyrgyzstan/freedom-world/2020[12] Anna Lelik, Disputed ‘foreign agent’ law shot down by Kyrgyzstan’s parliament, The Guardian, May 2016, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/may/12/foreign-agent-law-shot-down-by-kyrgyzstan-parliament. For more information see: FPC, Sharing worst practice: How countries and institutions in the former Soviet Union help create legal tools of repression, May 2016, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/sharingworstpractice/[13] Nationalism and religiosity in the country were addressed in the FPC’s 2018 publication ‘The rise of illiberal civil society in the former Soviet Union?’, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/the-rise-of-illiberal-civil-society-in-the-former-soviet-union/[14] Kamila Eshaliyeva, Is anti-Chinese mood growing in Kyrgyzstan?, openDemocracy, March 2019, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/anti-chinese-mood-growing-kyrgyzstan/; Nurlan Aliyev, Protest Against Chinese Migrants in Kyrgyzstan: Sinophobia or Demands for Social Justice?, The Central Asia-Caucasus, April 2019, http://www.cacianalyst.org/publications/analytical-articles/item/13568-protest-against-chinese-migrants-in-kyrgyzstan-sinophobia-or-demands-for-social-justice; David Trilling, Poll shows Uzbeks, like neighbors, growing leery of Chinese investments, Eurasianet, October 2020, https://eurasianet.org/poll-shows-uzbeks-like-neighbors-growing-leery-of-chinese-investments; Reuters Staff, Kyrgyz police disperse anti-Chinese rally, Reuters, January 2019, https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-kyrgyzstan-protests-china-idUKKCN1PB1L7[15] Catherine Putz, Tensions Flare at Kyrgyz Gold Mine, The Diplomat, August 2019, https://thediplomat.com/2019/08/tensions-flare-at-kyrgyz-gold-mine/[16] RFE/RL’s Kyrgyz Service, Kyrgyz Protesters Again Block Highway In Gold-Mine Protest, RFE/RL, October 2013, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-kumtor-gold-nationalization/25129980.html; RFE/RL’s Kyrgyz Service, Kyrgyz Protests Again Demand Nationalization of Major Gold Mine, RFE/RL, June 2013, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-kumtor-mine-protest/25029473.html; RFE/RL’s Kyrgyz Service, Ex-Kyrgyz Lawmaker Japarov Jailed On Hostage-Taking Charge, RFE/RL, August 2017, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-japarov-hostage-taking-charge-jailed/28655237.html; Sam Bhutia, Kyrgyzstan say its economy growing at a healthy clip. Really?, Eurasianet, November 2019, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-says-its-economy-is-growing-at-a-healthy-clip-really#:~:text=The%20Kumtor%20mine%20alone%20contributed,remained%20stable%20in%20recent%20years.&text=Apart%20from%20depending%20on%20one,Kyrgyzstan's%20exports%20are%20not%20diversified[17] Catherine Putz, Kyrgyz-Chinese Joint Venture Scrapped After Protests, The Diplomat, February 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/02/kyrgyz-chinese-joint-venture-scrapped-after-protests/[18] Ophelia Lai, Bishkek feminist art exhibition censored, ArtAsiaPacific, December 2019, http://www.artasiapacific.com/News/BishkekFeministArtExhibitionCensored[19] Mohira Suyarkulova, Fateful Feminnale: an insider’s view of “controversial” feminist art exhibition in Kyrgyzstan, openDemocracy, January 2020, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/fateful-feminnale-an-insiders-view-of-a-controversial-feminist-art-exhibition-in-kyrgyzstan/[20] For more on the symbolism of the Ak-kalpak, see: Ak-Kalpak Craftsmanship, Traditional Knowledge and Skills in Making and Wearing Kyrgyz Men’s Headwear, Intangible Cultural heritage, UNESCO, https://ich.unesco.org/en/lists[21] Women’s Rights Rally Held in Kyrgyz Capital, BBC Monitoring Central Asia Unit Supplied by BBC Worldwide Monitoring, March 2020, https://advance-lexis-com.mutex.gmu.edu/api/document?collection=news&id=urn:contentItem:5YD2-42T1-DYRV-33TC-00000-00&context=1516831[22] Reuters Staff, Central Asia tightens restrictions as coronavirus spreads, Reuters, March 2020, https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-centralasia/central-asia-tightens-restrictions-as-coronavirus-spreads-idUSKBN218090; AFP, Kyrgyz health minister, vice premier sacked over coronavirus response, Business Standard, April 2020, https://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/kyrgyz-health-minister-vice-premier-sacked-over-coronavirus-response-120040100745_1.html[23] Bermet Talant, Bishkek is running out of hospital beds as coronavirus pneumonia cases surge, Medium, July 2020, https://medium.com/@ser_ou_parecer/bishkek-running-out-of-hospital-beds-as-coronavirus-pneumonia-cases-surge-4817a7a41e1d. A number of these challenges were being faced across the world but exacerbated by the prior lack of capacity in Kyrgyzstan’s health sector.[24] AFP, Kyrgyz health minister, vice premier sacked over coronavirus response, Business Standard, April 2020, https://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/kyrgyz-health-minister-vice-premier-sacked-over-coronavirus-response-120040100745_1.html[25] Baktygul Osmonalieva, Ex-Minister of Health Kosmosbek Cholponbaev detained on suspicion of negligence, 24.kg, September 2020, https://24.kg/english/165292__Ex-Minister_of_Health_Kosmosbek_Cholponbaev_detained_on_suspicion_of_negligence/[26] RFE/RL’s Kyrgyz Service, Kyrgyz Prime Minister Resigns Over Corruption Probe, RFE/RL, June 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyz-prime-minister-abylgaziev-resigns-corruption-probe/30672225.html[27] Ruslan Kharizov, Members of Cabinet fined 140,000 soms for violation of mask requirement, 24.kg, June 2020, https://24.kg/english/157124_Members_of_Cabinet_fined_140000_soms_for_violation_of_mask_requirement/[28] Maria Zozulya, Emergency in Kyrgyzstan: Government Without Masks and the Precious Passes, CABAR, April 2020, https://cabar.asia/en/emergency-in-kyrgyzstan-government-without-masks-and-the-precious-passes[29] Kamila Eshaliyeva, Is Kyrgyzstan losing the fight against coronavirus?, openDemocracy, July 2020, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/kyrgyzstan-losing-fight-against-coronavirus/[30] Ayzirek Imanaliyeva, Kyrgyzstan: Volunteers play heroic role in battle against COVID-10, Eurasianet, July 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-volunteers-play-heroic-role-in-battle-against-covid-19[31] Zamira Kozhobaeva, COVID-19 in the Kyrgyz Republic: Real mortality may be three time higher than official data, Radio Azattyk, January 2021, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/covid-19-v-kr-realnaya-smertnost-vyshe-ofitsialnyh-dannyh-v-tri-raza/31053269.html[32] Ayzirek Imanaliyeva, Kyrgyzstan: Draft bill threatens to drive NGOs against the wall, Eurasianet, May 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-draft-bill-threatens-to-drive-ngos-against-the-wall; IPHR, Central Asia: Tightening the screws on government critics during the Covid-19 pandemic, November 2020, https://www.iphronline.org/central-asia-tightening-the-screws-on-government-critics-during-the-covid-19-pandemic.html[33] These two articles capture the dynamics of the change at different points in the contest: Bruce Pannier, No Coronavirus Postponement And No Front-Runners So Far In Kyrgyz Elections, RFE/RL, August 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/no-coronavirus-postponement-and-no-front-runners-so-far-in-kyrgyz-elections/30771625.html and Ayzirek Imanaliyeva, Kyrgyzstan vote: New-look parliament but old-style politics, Eurasianet, September 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-vote-new-look-parliament-but-old-style-politics[34] The OSCE’s election monitoring report notes that ‘According to bank reports, Birimdik incurred a total campaign spending of KGS 104.6 million, Kyrgyzstan – KGS 123.6 million and Mekenim Kyrgyzstan – KGS 142.5 million. All other parties reported expenditures below KGS 53 million each.’ ODIHR Limited Election Observation Mission, Final Report, Kyrgyz Republic, Parliamentary Elections, 4 October 2020, OSCE, December 2020, https://www.osce.org/files/f/documents/7/a/472461.pdf[35] Catherine Putz, After Brawls and Protests, Kyrgyzstan’s Campaigns Near Election Day, The Diplomat, September 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/09/after-brawls-and-protests-kyrgyzstans-campaigns-near-election-day/[36] For an example see: Chris Rickleton, Twitter Post, Twitter, October 2020, https://twitter.com/ChrisRickleton/status/1312649397168201729?s=20[37] ODIHR Limited Election Observation Mission, Final Report, Kyrgyz Republic, Parliamentary Elections, 4 October 2020, OSCE, December 2020, https://www.osce.org/files/f/documents/7/a/472461.pdf[38] Electoral Information System, Election of Deputies of the Supreme Council of the Kyrgyz Republic 4/10/2020, Overview of ballot counting, https://newess.shailoo.gov.kg/en/election/11098/ballot-count?type=NW_ROOT[39] IRI, Kyrgyzstan Poll Suggests High Voter Intent Ahead of Parliamentary Elections, September 2020, https://www.iri.org/resource/kyrgyzstan-poll-suggests-high-voter-intent-ahead-parliamentary-elections[40] Colleen Wood, Twitter Post, Twitter, October 2020, https://twitter.com/colleenwood_/status/1313086167248760832?s=20[41] Bermet Talant, Twitter Post, Twitter, October 2020, https://twitter.com/ser_ou_parecer/status/1313195446463016963?s=20; Joanna Lillis, Twitter Post, Twitter, October 2020, https://twitter.com/joannalillis/status/1313129376976953344?s=20[42] Bermet Talant, Twitter Post, Twitter, October 2020, https://twitter.com/ser_ou_parecer/status/1313234787029725186?s=20[43] Peter Leonard, As dawn breaks in Kyrgyzstan, protesters control government buildings, Eurasianet, October 2020, https://eurasianet.org/as-dawn-breaks-in-kyrgyzstan-protesters-control-government-buildings[44] Groups of young men often attached to sports clubs that act as social networks and in a number of cases of such groups there are perceived links to organised crime.[45] Ayzirek Imanaliyeva, Kyrgyzstan: In an uprising low on heroes, defense volunteers shine, Eurasianet, October 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-in-an-uprising-low-on-heroes-defense-volunteers-shine[46] Erica Marat, The incredible resilience of Kyrgyzstan, openDemocracy, October 2020, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/incredible-resilience-kyrgyzstan/[47] RFE/RL’s Kyrgyz Service, Kyrgyzstan Lawmakers Approve Japarov As New Prime Minister Days After He Was Sprung From Jail, RFE/RL, October 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyz-japarov-new-prime-minister-political-turmoil-atambaev-arrest/30885681.html; DW, Kyrgyzstan’s parliament taps Sadyr Zhaparov, as new premier, October 2020, https://www.dw.com/en/kyrgyzstans-parliament-taps-sadyr-zhaparov-as-new-premier/a-55270788; IPHR, Post-election protests plunge Kyrgyzstan into crisis, October 2020, https://www.iphronline.org/post-election-protests-plunge-kyrgyzstan-into-crisis.html[48] Bruce Pannier, Jeenbekov Failed To Tackle Kyrgyzstan’s Problems. Now He’s Gone, RFE/RL, October 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-jeenbekov-resignation-analysis-qishloq-ovozi/30896794.html[49] Peter Leonard, Twitter Post, Twitter, October 2020, https://twitter.com/Peter__Leonard/status/1313052691610951680?s=20; Kaktus Media, Tolekan Ismailova: There is no hope for parliament, the president must come out the underground, October 2020, https://kaktus.media/doc/423327_tolekan_ismailova:_na_parlament_nadejdy_net_prezident_doljen_vyyti_iz_podpolia.html; Aksana Ismailbekova, Intergenerational Conflict at the Core of Kyrgyzstan’s Turmoil, The Diplomat, October 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/10/intergenerational-conflict-at-the-core-of-kyrgyzstans-turmoil/[50] Bruce Pannier, A Hidden Force In Kyrgyzstan Hijacks The Opposition’s Push For Big Changes, RFE/RL, October 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/a-hidden-force-in-kyrgyzstan-hijacks-the-opposition-s-push-for-big-changes/30891583.html[51] Temur Umarov, Who’s In Charge Following Revolution In Kyrgyzstan?, The Moscow Times, October 2020, https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2020/10/26/whos-in-charge-following-revolution-in-kyrgyzstan-a71856[52] Sam Bhutia, Kyrgyzstan says its economy growing at a healthy clip. Really?, Eurasianet, November 2019, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-says-its-economy-is-growing-at-a-healthy-clip-really#:~:text=The%20Kumtor%20mine%20alone%20contributed,remained%20stable%20in%20recent%20years.&text=Apart%20from%20depending%20on%20one,Kyrgyzstan's%20exports%20are%20not%20diversified[53] Zairbek Baktybaev, Is the assault on the White House a planned action? Radio Azattyk, October 2012, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/kyrgyzstan_power_opposition/24736283.html; David Trilling, Kyrgyzstan: Nationalist MPs and Rioters Attempt to Storm Parliament, Eurasianet, October 2012, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-nationalist-mps-and-rioters-attempt-to-storm-parliament[54] David Trilling, Kyrgyzstan: Nationalist MPs and Rioters Attempt to Storm Parliament, Eurasianet, October 2012, https://cabar.asia/en/who-is-acting-president-of-kyrgyzstan-sadyr-zhaparov-here-s-the-explanation[55] RFE/RL’s Kyrgyz Service, Kyrgyz Police Disperse Mine Protest, RFE/RL, October 2013, https://www.rferl.org/a/kumtor-kyrgyzstan-gold-mine-hostage/25129053.html[56] Nurjamal Djanibekova, Kyrgyzstan: Two Opposition Trials Conclude With Lengthy Sentences, Eurasianet, August 2017, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-two-opposition-trials-conclude-with-lengthy-sentences; Emilbek Kaptagaev, Facebook post, Facebook, August 2017, https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=728676047334502&id=100005763398264[57] Gulzat Baialieva and Joldon Kutmanaliev, How Kyrgyz social media backed an imprisoned politician’s meteoric rise to power, openDemocracy, October 2020, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/how-kyrgyz-social-media-backed-an-imprisoned-politicians-meteoric-rise-to-power/; Gulzat Baialieva and Joldon Kutmanaliev, In Kyrgyzstan, social media hate goes unchecked, openDemocracy, December 2020, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/kyrgyzstan-social-media-hate-goes-unchecked/; Elena Korotkova, “Made a revolution out of prison.” What Sadyr Zhaparov told about in an interview with Kommersant, kloop, January 2021, https://kloop.kg/blog/2021/01/11/sdelal-revolyutsiyu-iz-tyurmy-o-chem-rasskazal-sadyr-zhaparov-v-intervyu-kommersantu/[58] Asel Doolotkeldieva, Twitter Post, Twitter, December 2020, https://twitter.com/adoolotkeldieva/status/1342036354335715332?s=11; FPC, The rise of illiberal civil society in the former Soviet Union?, July 2018, https://fpc.org.uk/publications/the-rise-of-illiberal-civil-society-in-the-former-soviet-union/[59] Yuri Kopytin, Kamchybek Tashiev appointed Chairman of SCNS, 24.kg, October 2020, https://24.kg/english/169646_Kamchybek_Tashiev_appointed_Chairman_of_SCNS/[60] Oksana Gut, “Corrupt officials should not be imprisoned, it is enough to return the stolen goods”, vb.kg, October 2020, https://www.vb.kg/doc/393327_korrypcionerov_ne_nado_sajat_v_turmy_dostatochno_vernyt_ykradennoe.html[61] Oksana Gut, Matraimova, according to the agreement, will be fined and banned from holding public office for 3 years, vb.kg, October 2020, https://www.vb.kg/doc/393320_matraimova_po_soglasheniu_jdet_shtraf_i_zapret_zanimat_gosdoljnosti_3_goda.html; Radio Azattyk, The State Committee for National Security identified about 40 people from the closest circle of Matraimov involved in his corruption scheme, October 2020, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/30900569.html[62] RFE/RL’s Kyrgyz Service, Kyrgyz Acting President Announces ‘Economic Amnesty’ After Powerful Oligarch’s House Arrest, RFE/RL, October 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-economic-amnesty-japarov-matraimov-house-arrest-oligarchs/30905101.html; Zdravko Ljubas, New Kyrgyz Authorities Act Against Graft, Matraimov, OCCRP, October 2020, https://www.occrp.org/en/daily/13272-new-kyrgyz-authorities-act-against-graft-matraimov?fbclid=IwAR20RcpzFEsE7Af_pFDWvvyus77DYUIfx5MyL1eKkiLBERmsQ5d5uw3nnlo[63] Kamila Eshaliyeva, Real fakes: how Kyrgyzstan’s troll factories work, openDemocracy, November 2020, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/troll-factories-kyrgyzstan/?source=in-article-related-story; Kaktus Media, Matraimov and Japarov. When there is one “troll factory” for two, February 2021, https://kaktus.media/doc/432331_matraimov_i_japarov._kogda_na_dvoih_odna_fabrika_trolley.html[64] RFE/RL, Ex-Bishkek Mayor Jailed For Corruption, July 2013, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyzstan-bishkek-mayor-corruption/25060829.html; AKIpress, Nariman Tuleev became acting mayor of Bishkek, October 2020, https://akipress.com/news:649885:Nariman_Tuleev_became_acting_mayor_of_Bishkek/;  Kaktus Media, Twitter Post, Twitter, October 2020, https://twitter.com/kaktus__media/status/1318467547138789376. However on October 22nd he was pushed out himself: Maria Orlova, Nariman Tyuleev refused the post and. About. Mayor of Bishkek: a dirty struggle of groups, 24.kg, October 2020, https://24.kg/vlast/170262_nariman_tyuleev_otkazalsya_otpostaio_mera_bishkeka_gryaznaya_borba_gruppirovok/[65] Members of the government, Government of Kyrgyzstan, https://www.gov.kg/ky/gov/s/103[66] The Central Elections Commission decision to order a re-run of the elections was blocked by the courts in line with the wishes of the interim President.[67] Bermet Talant, Twitter Post, Twitter, November 2020, https://twitter.com/ser_ou_parecer/status/1324370570507620352?s=20[68] Eurasianet, Kyrgyzstan: Parliament reshuffle paves way for Japarov to cement power, November 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-parliament-reshuffle-paves-way-for-japarov-to-cement-power?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter[69] The initial draft version of the constitution on the Supreme Council Website quoted here has now been replaced with the revised version produced in February 2021: Jogorku Kenesh of the Kyrgyz Republic, From November 17, 2020, the draft Law of the Kyrgyz Republic “On the appointment of a referendum (nationwide vote) on the draft Law of the Kyrgyz Republic One the Constitution of Kyrgyz Republic”, November 2020, http://www.kenesh.kg/ru/article/show/7324/na-obshtestvennoe-obsuzhdenie-s-17-noyabrya-2020-goda-vinositsya-proekt-zakona-kirgizskoy-respubliki-o-naznachenii-referenduma-vsenarodnogo-golosovaniya-po-proektu-zakona-kirgizskoy-respubliki-o-konstitutsii-kirgizskoy-respubliki; Kaktus Media, Deputies of the Jogorku Kenesh adopted the bill on referendum in two readings at once, December 2020, https://kaktus.media/doc/427740_depytaty_jogorky_kenesha_priniali_zakonoproekt_o_referendyme_srazy_v_dvyh_chteniiah.html[70] Catherine Putz, What’s in Kyrgyzstan’s Proposed ‘Khanstitution’?, The Diplomat, November 2020, https://thediplomat.com/2020/11/whats-in-kyrgyzstans-proposed-khanstitution/[71] The principles were set out by Japarov in this interview: Kaktus Media, Sadyr Zhaparov, said that he has a draft constitutional reform ready (video), October 2020, https://kaktus.media/doc/424039_sadyr_japarov_skazal_chto_y_nego_gotov_proekt_reformy_konstitycii_video.html[72]Ayday Tokoeva, “The president is crushing the legislative and judicial branches of government.” Ex-MP of Sher-Niyaz on amendments to the Constitution, kloop, November 2020, https://kloop.kg/blog/2020/11/18/prezident-podminaet-pod-sebya-zakonodatelnuyu-i-sudebnuyu-vetvi-vlasti-eks-deputat-sher-niyaz-o-popravkah-v-konstitutsiyu/[73] Abhi Goyal, Twitter Post, Twitter, November 2020, https://twitter.com/goyal_abhi/status/1328780940777230340?s=21[74] RFE/RL's Kyrgyz Service, Acting Kyrgyz President Says Constitutional Council Will Be Established To Implement Reforms, RFE/RL, November 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/acting-kyrgyz-president-says-constitutional-council-will-be-established-to-implement-reforms/30927703.html; Radio Azattyk, Edil Baysalov proposed to rename the Jogorku Kenesh to Kurultai or National Assembly, November 2020, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/30975946.html[75] Bektour Iskender, Twitter Post, Twitter, November 2020, https://twitter.com/bektour/status/1332613244310200320; Human Rights Watch, Kyrgyzstan: Bad Faith Efforts to Overhaul Constitution, November 2020, https://www.hrw.org/news/2020/11/21/kyrgyzstan-bad-faith-efforts-overhaul-constitution#; Tatyana Kudryavtseva, Referendum on form of government scheduled for January 10, 2021, 24.kg, December 2020, https://24.kg/english/176489_Referendum_on_form_of_government_scheduled_for_January_10_2021/[76] ODIHR, Early Presidential Election, 10 January 2021, OSCE, https://www.osce.org/odihr/elections/kyrgyzstan/473139[77] Electoral Information System, https://newess.shailoo.gov.kg/en/[78] RFE/RL’s Kyrgyz Service, Trimmed-Down Kyrgyz Cabinet Sworn In After Parliament’s Approval, RFE/RL, February 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyz-lawmakers-approve-new-government-/31084236.html[79] AFP, Kyrgyz Coalition Puts Forward New PM, Barron’s, February 2021, https://www.barrons.com/news/kyrgyz-coalition-puts-forward-new-pm-01612174805?tesla=y; Kaktus Media, Government without Surabaldieva. New line-up proposed by Ulukbek Maripov, February 2021, https://kaktus.media/doc/431074_pravitelstvo_bez_syrabaldievoy._novyy_sostav_predlojennyy_ylykbekom_maripovym.html; Ayzirek Imanaliyeva, Kyrgyzstan: Parliament approves new, streamlined government, Eurasianet, February 2021, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-parliament-approves-new-streamlined-government[80] Kaktus Media, Government without Surabaldieva. New line-up proposed by Ulukbek Maripov, February 2021, https://kaktus.media/doc/431074_pravitelstvo_bez_syrabaldievoy._novyy_sostav_predlojennyy_ylykbekom_maripovym.html[81] Gulmira Makanbai, Rally against appointment of Ulukbek Maripov as Prime Minister held in Bishkek, 24.kg, February 2021, https://24.kg/english/182213_Rally_against_appointment_of_Ulukbek_Maripov_as_Prime_Minister_held_in_Bishkek/[82] Jogorku Kenesh of the Kyrgyz Republic, The draft Constitution of the Kyrgyz Republic if posted on the official website of the Jogorku Kenesh, February 2021, http://kenesh.kg/ru/news/show/11009/proekt-konstitutsii-kirgizskoy-respubliki-razmeshten-na-ofitsialynom-sayte-zhogorku-kenesha;Version of the Legislation with an updated draft attached: Jogorku Kenesh of the Kyrgyz Republic, From November 17, 2020, the draft Law of the Kyrgyz Republic “On the appointment of a referendum (nationwide vote) on the draft Law of the Kyrgyz Republic “On the Constitution of the Kyrgyz Republic”, November 2020, http://kenesh.kg/ru/article/show/7324/na-obshtestvennoe-obsuzhdenie-s-17-noyabrya-2020-goda-vinositsya-proekt-zakona-kirgizskoy-respubliki-o-naznachenii-referenduma-vsenarodnogo-golosovaniya-po-proektu-zakona-kirgizskoy-respubliki-o-konstitutsii-kirgizskoy-respubliki[83] Adilet, Analysis of the draft Constitution of the Kyrgyz Republic, February 2021, https://adilet.kg/tpost/2i09a01nu1-analiz-proekta-konstitutsii-kirgizskoi-r[84] The example cited was German Basic Law Article 5.2 which creates this caveat on free speech rights ‘These rights shall find their limits in the provisions of general laws, in provisions for the protection of young persons and in the right to personal honour’, Gesetze-im-internet.de, https://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/englisch_gg/englisch_gg.pdf[85] AKIpress, Constitutional referendum and local elections set for April 11: Japarov, February 2021, https://akipress.com/news:654513:Constitutional_referendum_and_local_elections_set_for_April_11__Japarov/[86] Chris Rickleton, Kyrgyzstan: Mining sector braces for regulatory blow, Eurasianet, November 2020, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-mining-sector-braces-for-regulatory-blow?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter[87]Kanat Shaku, Foreign investors banned from future mining projects in Kyrgyzstan, BNE News, February 2021, https://intellinews.com/foreign-investors-banned-from-future-mining-projects-in-kyrgyzstan-201724/[88] Daily Sabah, Turkey, Kyrgyzstan to sign framework deal for cooperation in mining. February 2021, https://www.dailysabah.com/business/energy/turkey-kyrgyzstan-to-sign-framework-deal-for-cooperation-in-mining[89] Georgy Mamedov, “Japarov is our Trump”: why Kyrgyzstan is the future of global politics, openDemocracy, January 2021, https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/odr/japarov-is-our-trump-kyrgyzstan-is-the-future-of-global-politics/; Erica Marat, Twitter Post, Twitter, January 2021, https://twitter.com/Ericamarat/status/1348273098370519040; Toktosun Shambetov, What form of government do the candidates for the presidency of Kyrgyzstan choose?, Radio Azattyk, December 2020, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/31011983.html; The Economist, Sadyr Japarov is elected president of Kyrgyzstan in a landslide, January 2021, https://www.economist.com/asia/2021/01/14/sadyr-japarov-is-elected-president-of-kyrgyzstan-in-a-landslide[90] Asel Doolotkeldieva, Twitter Post, Twitter, January 2021, https://twitter.com/ADoolotkeldieva/status/1348230029906489344?s=20[91] Asel Doolotkeldieva, Twitter Post, Twitter, January 2021, https://twitter.com/ADoolotkeldieva/status/1348312032337133569?s=20[92] Ryskeldi Satke, The Downside of Foreign Aid in Kyrgyzstan, The Diplomat, June 2017, https://thediplomat.com/2017/06/the-downside-of-foreign-aid-in-kyrgyzstan/; The World Bank, Kyrgyz Republic, https://data.worldbank.org/country/KG[93] What a number of observers describe as clans: RFE/RL’s Service, OCCRP, Kloop, and Bellingcat, A Powerful Kyrgyz Clan’s Political Play, RFE/RL, October 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/30870040.html[94] Omurbek Ibraev, Cost of Politics in Kyrgyzstan, WFD, September 2019, https://www.wfd.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Cost-of-Politics-Kyrgyzstan.pdf; Erica Marat, Kyrgyzstan’s Protests Won’t Keep Corrupt Criminals Out of Politics, Foreign Policy, October 2020, https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/10/22/kyrgyzstans-protests-wont-keep-corrupt-criminals-out-of-politics/[95] RFE/RL’s Service, OCCRP, Kloop, and Bellingcat, The Matraimov Kingdom, RFE/RL, October 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/the-matraimov-kingdom/30868683.html[96] UNODC. Afghan Opiate Trafficking Along the Northern Route, June 2018, https://www.unodc.org/rpanc/en/Sub-programme-4/afghan-opiate-trafficking-along-the-northern-route.html[97] Results of research by the international SHADOW project presented in Bishkek, IBC Members’ News, December 2020, http://ibc.kg/en/news/members/4807_results_of_a_research_of_the_international_shadow_project_presented_in_bishkek[98] Eleanor Beishenbek, The secret of the success of “Rayima Million”, Radio Azattyk, August 2015, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/27215390.html[99] Ali Toktakunov, Following in the footsteps of millions of dollars withdrawn from Kyrgyzstan, Radio Azattyk, May 2019, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/29971887.html; OCCRP, RFE/RL, and Kloop, The $700 million man, RFE/RL, November 2019, https://www.rferl.org/a/the-700-million-man/30284812.html[100] OCCRP, RFE/RL, and Kloop, A Real Estate Empire Built on Dark Money, OCCRP, December 2019, https://www.occrp.org/en/plunder-and-patronage/a-real-estate-empire-built-on-dark-money[101] OCCRP, RFE/RL, Kloop, and Bellingcat, ‘His Murder Is Necessary’: Man Who Exposed Kyrgyz Smuggling Scheme Was Hunted By Contract Killers, RFE/RL, November 2010, https://www.rferl.org/a/man-who-exposed-kyrgyz-smuggling-scheme-was-hunted-by-contract-killers/30940261.html[102] Nurjamal Djanibekova, Kyrgyzstan: Impromptu rally signals new way of opposing corruption, Eurasianet, November 2019, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-impromptu-rally-signals-new-way-of-opposing-corruption[103] RFE/RL’s Service, OCCRP, Kloop, and Bellingcat, The Matraimov Kingdom, RFE/RL, October 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/the-matraimov-kingdom/30868683.html[104] OCCRP, RFE/RL’s Radio Radio Azattyk, Kloop, and Bellingcat, The ‘Beautiful’ Life of a Kyrgyz Customs Official, OCCRP, December 2020, https://www.occrp.org/en/the-matraimov-kingdom/the-beautiful-life-of-a-kyrgyz-customs-official[105] The OCCRP Team, So Your Reporting Became a Factor in an Ongoing Revolution. What Do You Do Next?, Medium, October 2020, https://medium.com/occrp-unreported/so-your-reporting-became-a-factor-in-an-ongoing-revolution-what-do-you-do-next-54b993a11a39[106] Zdravko Ljubas, Kyrgyz Authorities Arrest Raiymbek Matraimov, OCCRP, October 2020, https://www.occrp.org/en/daily/13282-kyrgyz-authorities-arrest-matraimov-the-700-million-man[107] Currenttime, Ex-Deputy Head of Kyrgyz Customs Transferred Almost $ 6 Million to the State in Corruption Case, November 2020, https://www.currenttime.tv/a/matraimov-kazna-6-mln/30956200.html; OCCRP, Kyrgyz Ex-Customs Official Matraimov Pleads Guilty to Graft, Fined $3000, February 2021, https://www.occrp.org/en/daily/13850-kyrgyz-ex-customs-official-matraimov-pleads-guilty-to-graft-fined-3000; Oksana Gut, Matraimova, according to the agreement, will be fined and banned from holding public office for 3 years, vb.kg, October 2020, https://www.vb.kg/doc/393320_matraimova_po_soglasheniu_jdet_shtraf_i_zapret_zanimat_gosdoljnosti_3_goda.html; Radio Azattyk, Matraimov pleaded guilty to organizing corruption schemes at customs. He was sentenced to a fine of 260 thousand soms, February 2021, https://rus.azattyk.org/a/31097620.html[108] RFE/RL’s Kyrgyz Service, Kyrgyz Activists Rally Against Corruption, RFE?RL, February 2021, https://www.rferl.org/a/kyrgyz-activists-rally-against-corruption/31102170.html[109] Catherine Putz, In Kyrgyzstan, Controversial Former Customs Official Matraimov Rearrested, The Diplomat, February 2021, https://thediplomat.com/2021/02/in-kyrgyzstan-controversial-former-customs-official-matraimov-rearrested/; Catherine Putz, In Kyrgyzstan, Matraimov Placed in Pretrial Detention as Money Laundering Investigation Moves Ahead, The Diplomat, February 2021, https://thediplomat.com/2021/02/matraimov-placed-in-pretrial-detention-as-money-laundering-investigation-moves-ahead/[110] U.S. Department of the Treasury, Treasury Sanctions Corrupt Actors in Africa and Asia, December 2020, https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm1206[111] Lydia Osborne, Kamchybek Kolbayev, OCCRP, June 2018, https://www.occrp.org/en/goldensands/profiles/kamchybek-kolbayev[112] RFE/RL’s Kyrgyz Service, Reputed Kyrgyz Crime Boss To Be Released From Prison, RFE/RL, May 2014, https://www.rferl.org/a/reputed-kyrgyz-crime-boss-to-be-released-from-prison/25389844.html[113] RFE/RL’s Kyrgyz Service, OCCRP, Kloop, and Bellingcat, The Kolbaev Connection, RFE/RL, December 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/matraimov-kolbaev-kyrgyzstan-corruption/30996468.html[114] RFE/RL’s Kyrgyz Service, Notorious Kyrgyz Crime Boss Detained In Bishkek, RFE/RL, October 2020, https://www.rferl.org/a/notorious-kyrgyz-crime-boss-detained-in-bishkek/30906562.html[115] Chris Rickelton and Bekpolot Ibraimov, Kyrgyzstan: Kingmaker lurks behind curtain as politics heat up, Eurasianet, July 2019, https://eurasianet.org/kyrgyzstan-kingmaker-lurks-behind-curtain-as-politics-heat-up[116] Erica Marat, Kyrgyzstan’s Protests Won’t Keep Corrupt Criminals Out of Politics, Foreign Policy, October 2020, https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/10/22/kyrgyzstans-protests-wont-keep-corrupt-criminals-out-of-politics/[117] Sarah Chayes, The Structure of Corruption: A Systemic Analysis Using Eurasian Cases, Carnegie Endowment, June 2016, https://carnegieendowment.org/files/CP274_Chayes_EurasianCorruptionStructure_final1.pdf[118] Open Government Partnership, Kyrgyz Republic, Member Since 2017, Action Plan 1, https://www.opengovpartnership.org/members/kyrgyz-republic/[119] Yuri Kopytin, Crime boss Kadyrbek Dosonov brought to Bishkek from Osh city, 24.kg, February 2021, https://24.kg/english/183136_Crime_boss_Kadyrbek_Dosonov_brought_to_Bishkek_from_Osh_city/; Kloop, Twitter Post, Twitter, February 2021, https://twitter.com/kloopnews/status/1361950547486646274?s=20[120] Albeit one whose name would often overlap with that used to describe ethnic Kazakhs.[121] Alisher Khamidov, Brewing ethnic tension causing worry in south Kyrgyzstan, Refworld, November 2002, https://www.refworld.org/docid/46cc322dc.html[122] Erica Marat, National Investigation of the Osh Violence Yields Little Results, Refworld, January 2011, https://www.refworld.org/docid/4d469cb52.html; Human Rights Watch, “Where is the Justice?” Interethnic Violence in Southern Kyrgyzstan and its Aftermath, August 2010, https://www.hrw.org/report/2010/08/16/where-justice/interethnic-violence-southern-kyrgyzstan-and-its-aftermath